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Full text of "Kansas State collegian"



KANSAS STATE HI8T03ICAL SOCIETT 
TOPEKA, KS 66612 EXCH 



Nixon egged on 
by English crowd 



OXFORD (AP)— Richard Nixon, showered with jeers and 
applause, protesters' eggs and British courtesy, told a student 
group in this historic university town Thursday he has "not 
retired from life" and will continue to speak out on public af- 
fairs. 

"I feel as long as I have any breath in me I will speak up for 
what I believe," the former president told an audience of 800 in 
the hall of the prestigious Oxford Union debating society. 

Nixon disclosed in his remarks that as president he had 
authorized wiretaps and break-ins to root out a group of 
Palestinian terrorists in the United States. 

The ex-president arrived and departed from the 19th-century 
building through a battery of 500 noisy, egg-tossing protesters, 
both British and American students. During his 20-minute ad- 
dress on foreign affairs and the 90-minute question-and-answer 
period that followed, he frequently had to speak over angry 



chants of "We Want Nixon Dead! " and "No More Nixon! " from 
the demonstrators outside. 

As he left, protesters waving placards— "Why Shame Us 
Here?," "Nixon, Crawl Back Into Your HoW— grappled with 80 
police officers who linked arm-in-arm in a vain effort to keep 
them from pounding on Nixon's black limousine. 

One U.S. Secret Service man swung his fists wildly at the 
protesters as he lunged from side to side of the road and onto the 
roof of Nixon's car to guide it through the crowd. 

Police said there were 10 arrests, but a police spokeman 
added, "On the whole, the demonstration was conducted in a 
good-humored way . " 

Climaxing a week-long trip to Europe marking his active 
return to international affairs, the pink-cheeked Nixon told the 
packed audience of Oxford University students and faculty : 

"I have retired from politics but I have not retired from life." 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Friday 



December 1, 1978 
Kansas State University 
AAanhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 85, No. 66 



Big dams are out, conservation in 



By KELLY W1LKERSON 
Collegian Reporter 

The days of big dam building are over and 
America is moving to a new era of con- 
servation rather then control, according to 
Daniel Beard, deputy assistant secretary 
for land and water resources, Department 
of the Interior. 

Beard spoke on President Carter's water 
resource policy to a group of about 60 people 
Tuesday afternoon in Thompson Hall. 

"Current water resource policies will 
have a general movement away from 
development of water resources toward a 
system of water management," according 
to Beard. 

Beard said the reason for the move to 
management in the Carter policies is due to 
the increase in costs of construction of dams 
and other water projects. 

Because of such things as Proposition 13 
and the general trend by the public to cut 
government spending, the government is 
not able to keep up with rising prices of the 
projects, Beard said. 

Beard also said he thought President 
Carter's personal interest in the country's 
water resource policies had a great deal of 
influence on the'recent policy reforms. 

"I think he was the first chief executive 
with enough guts to take the issue head on," 
Beard said. 

According to Beard, when Carter's "hit 



list" came out, all water projects were 
reviewed to establish which projects where 
necessary. 

Under the guidelines set up by President 
Carter, water projects must prove they are 
cost-effective and responsive to the needs of 
the people they serve, he said. 

These guidelines are the criteria by which 
Carter decides which projects he will fund, 
according to Beard. 

An increase in the involvement of state 
governments in the decision-making 
process was another aspect Carter wanted, 
he said. 

Many federal decisions were being made 
without state involvement, so the president 
started a $50 million program to try and 
insure greater participation by the states, 
according to Beard. 

New cost-sharing legislation presented by 
Carter requires each state to provide 10 
percent of the funding for the projects, he 
said. 

BEFORE THIS legislation. Beard said, 
"every federal project was a federal freebie 
to the state." By requiring the state to 
become active in the decision-making and 
financial aspects of projects, states will 
become more selective in which projects 
they choose, he said. 

Making the state more a part of the 
project also will help remove some of the 



workload of the federal government, ac- 
cording to Beard. 

In the area of environmental protection, 
Carter found the existing laws were suf- 
ficient, but the laws weren't being enforced, 
he said. In order to enforce the laws, a 
number of measures were set up to insure 
the present laws would be enforced, ac- 
cording to Beard. 

Carter also wants to establish a national 
water conservation program to promote 
conservation in areas of the country where 
water supplies a re low, he said. 



According to Beard, implementation of 
the president's reforms should be mostly 
completed within about a year. 

Looking ahead to the future, Beard said he 
thought changing public opinion has played 
an important part in the news views toward 
water resource policies. 

Beard said the drought of two years ago 
caused states like Kansas to start water 
policy review efforts in an attempt to un- 
derstand and better perceive the problems 
of conserving water resources. 



Senate rejects plan for 
council financial board 



Student Senate last night defeated a bill 
which would have established a College 
Council Financial Board. 

The bill would have allowed college 
councils to prepare their own budgets ac- 
cording to the needs of their college. 
Presently, the college council funding is 
based on head count and not on justification 
for the need of that college. 

The bill would have also allowed funds in 
the college council accounts to be returned 




to the college council financial board. The 
board then would have had the authority to 
allocate those funds as it would have seen fit 
after final allocations. 

The college council then would have had 
one year to spend the funds returned from 
the previous fiscal year. After one year, the 
money would have gone back to the SGA 
general fund. 

"It would be a duplication of effort. The 
financial board would look at the groups and 
their budgets and the same groups would go 
before senate finance committee and 
present the budgets again," said E. J. 
Compton, finance committee chairman. 

"If the college councils are not in favor of 
it now, I don't see how they will be able to 
work together as a body," Bill Manning, 
business senator, said. 

IN OTHER BUSINESS, first readings 
were heard on a referendum supporting a 
new fieldhouse, which will be voted on by 
senate next Thursday. If the referendum 
passes senate, it will come before the 
student body at student government elec- 
tions next February. 

The proposed referendum provides for a 
new multipurpose building to host men's 
and women's basketball, concerts and 
athletic offices. 

Senate voted to give $105 to the Students 
for Handicapped Concerns so a bad weather 
shuttle-car service can be retained for 
handicapped students. 

The transportation service, provided by 
the University for handicapped students, 
would have been cut because of a $3.50 in- 
crease per day in car rental fees. 



Siall pholo by Tom Sell 



NEW KID IN CLASS?... Daniel Beard, deputy assistant secretary for the Department of the Interior 
wa i ts to a ddress a group i n Thorn pson Ha 1 1 . 



nside 



GOOD MORNING, there isn't an 
academic m»(or for It, but Security and 
Traffic officers go through a good deal of 
training to get their |ob. Details, page SM- 
ARTS AND Entertainment this week 
looks at a new novel, belly dancing and a 
Id year old sophomore In speech and 
theater. Details, page I... 

WILDCAT COACH Jack Hartman is 
hoping for his 300th major collage vic- 
tory. Details, page 11... 

■- 



KANSAS «TATE COLLEQIAN, Fri.,D«:«mben > W6 



Carter vows to curb inflation in lieu of reelection* 



WASHINGTON (AP) - President 
Carter, asserting his anti-inflation program 
"is exactly what the American people 
want," vowed Thursday that he is deter- 



mined to curb inflation even if it proves 
politically disastrous. 

Carter was asked at his nationally 
broadcast news conference whether he 



Ag Council casts final vote 
to ratify referendum plan 



Agriculture Council approved a con- 
stitutional revision last night allowing a 
referendum to be validated if two-thirds of 
voting students are in favor of the issue. 

It was the sixth council to approve the 
revision, completing the required number of 



Campus 
Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ASME CHRISTMAS BANQUET Is Dec «. ticket* are 

available In Sea Ion 106 

FRUIT CAK Ef are now on sale in Shellentwoer 101 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING t Shirts are on Sale In 

Sea Ion 106 

AUDITIONS for the spring opera "Tne Old Maid end the 

Thlel" and "The Telephone" are in McCain Auditorium at 
7 lonighl and J p m Saturday 

PRELAW ADVISING OFFICE will present "Oppor 
tunnies in Law at Southern Methodist University School ol 
Law" 14 pm Tuesday in Union MS. 

UFM BELLYOANCE CLASS RECITAL is In Umberger's 

Williams Auditorium at 7 tonight charge Is SI. 

UFM'S FINE ARTS AND CRAFTS SALE Is today and 

Saturday* am. Ipm at the UFM House. Hit Thurston. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL has scheduled the final oral 
delense ol the doctoral dissertation of John Tabor lor 9: 30 
a.m. loday in Acltert?!!. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL has scheduled the tlnal oral 
defense Of the doctoral dissertation ol Willi em Atwell fori 
p.m. Monday in Shellenberger Conference Room. 

TODAY 

INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWHSIP will meet 
inUnionltlatJp.m 

CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST will meet al the Chi 
Omega House at J ; 30 p. m 

THE GAMBIT CLU B will meet In Oenlson 72* at I p. m. 



DELTA OMEGA ALPHA will meet at Darkhorse Tavern at 
3 p.m. 

INTERNATIONAL COORDINATING COUNCIL will meet 
al the International Student Center at J p 



PR E> NUR SI NO STU DE NTS can sign up for the Washburn 
tour in Samelsun's otflce in Eisenhower. 

SATURDAY 

NORTHERN FLINT HILLS AUDUBON Will meet In 
At ker I's park i ng lot at f a . m. 

SOCIAL WORK CLUB will meet at Reynard's Restaurant 
af 5:30 p. m 

PHI UPSILON omicron wilt meet In Justin's lobby at 
J. 30 p.m 



PRE VET CLUB will meet in the Union parking lot at 8:30 
p m for directions to the Knights of Columbus Hal I where a 
dance will be held f p.m t am 



K STATE BNA1 BRITH HILLEL will meet In Union 108 ata 
p.m. 

GOLDEN HEARTS-SIG EP Christmas party Is at the 5lg 

Ep House beginning at 8 p m. 

ALPHA CHI SIGMA will meet at Gregov's Restaurant at 
4:30 p.m. 

DELTA PSI KAPPA win meet outside Mrs. Poole's office 
at 4pm 

k lair ES will meet in the Union KSU Rooms at 7 p.m. 

KANSAS STATE SPORTS CAR CLUB will meet In Waters' 
parking lot at noon. 

ARTS AND SCIENCE COUNCIL will meet in Union 301 at 7 

p.m 



council votes to ratify the plan. 

On Nov. 5, Student Senate approved the 
constitutional referendum revision but it 
needed further approval from 6 of the 9 
college councils before becoming law. 

The present constitution requires one- 
third of the student body to vote on a 
referendum, with a simple majority of 
favorable votes to pass the issue. 

With the new revision, a referendum will 
pass if one-third of the student body votes, 
and the issue passes by a simple majority. If 
less than one-third of the student body votes, 
the referendum will require a two-thirds 
majority to pass. 



would risk being a one-term president by 
advocating government actions which could 
alienate many groups. 

"I would maintain the fight against in- 
flation," he said, adding that "...I believe 
this is exactly what the American people 
want." 

Then, when later asked if the nation's 
economic problems meant Americans 
might have to accept a lower standard of 
living, he said, "I see no reason for despair 
at all." 

Carter also said the mass murder-suicides 
at Jonestown, Guyana, were atypical of 
American life. And the president 
acknowledged he has been somewhat 
discouraged by the inability of Egypt and 
Israel to agree on a peace treaty. 

Of the nation's economic woes, the 
president said, "We don't anticipate a 
recession or depression next year. " 

A number of prominent economists have 
predicted a recession in 1979 as a result of 



rtMlUIIIHHIiiiiillllllllllllllll, 



Carter's wage and price guidelines which 
would gernerally limit wage and benefit 
increases to 7 percent and price increases to 
roughly 5.75 percent 

CARTER SAID details of his wage and 
price guidelines still have not been made 
final and that, while he has not yet made any 
changes in his overall program, "with a 
thousand different decisions to be made, 
there will be some flexibility." Carter also 
commented publicly about the deaths of 
more than 900 members of the Peoples 
Temple cult in Jonestown, Guyana, saying 
he didn't think the cult "was typical in any 
way of America. 

"I don't think we ought to have an 
overreaction because of the Jonestown 
tragedy by injecting government into trying 
to control people's religious beliefs," Carter 
added. 



K-State Hillel Presents 
Rabbi Arthur Abrams 

Rabbi Abrams will be 

discussing Chanukah 

and its meaning today 

with . , ."No Sarah, there is no 

Chanukah Bush" 

Sunday night, 8 p.m. 

Dec. 3 

K -State Union, Room 208 



the pest waited -1920 prion 




6l6N.12,THnAegievft1e 

JON U? t«R M: GrtK SfWOM/ ffiOM 4-50O 



3 fOt M «K£ Of 1 1 



Enjoy 3 set-ups and pay for only 1 

(Hi ball and fk» drinks only; tr» three drfianut b» #» ■arm) 



% 



miiiiniimiiiiniiuiiiiiiiiiiHmniiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiihiiiuu iiuiuiimiumnmmuiiimmiiiuiiuii 





Downtown Manhattan 77K-70:s 
Open Mon -Sal. till S:30 Thursday til 8:31 



■ 



- Briefly 



By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 



U. of Texas to see what makes ticks tick 

WASHINGTON— The Agriculture Department has approved a 
$28,026 grant to help a team of University of Texas scientists find out 
what makes ticks tick. 

The scientists will work on ways to "fingerprint different kinds of 
ticks" by studying their "isoenzyme systems," says the depart- 
ment's Science and Education Administration. Scientists hope to 
"relate the genetic information to which hosts (victims) the ticks 
prefer and to econological conditions." 

If this can be done, they may find out ways to curb ticks, which are 
bothersome to livestock. 



For the birds— edible sculpture 

BALTIMORE— Art student Maripat Neff admits her latest 
sculpture is for the birds. 

It is an untitled work of art— second-hand clothes hanging on a 
clothesline above garages near her art school. 

But this is no simple laundry drying. The clothes have wire 
pockets and collars which hold suet and birdseed. 

Neff, 24, calls it an "environmental sculpture." 

"I've been putting bakery goods out, hoping to attract more bir- 
ds," she said. "When I was out there today, there were only 
seagulls." 

Neff used to work in other forms, such as plastic, but recently she 
said, "I've done a lot of things with seeds and growing pieces." 



Rolling Stones 9 guitarist Woods divorced 

LONDON— Rock guitarist Ronnie Woods of The Rolling Stones 
was divorced by his wife, Chrissie, on grounds of adultery with 
model Jo Howard. 

Woods, 31, did not contest his 30-year-old wife's suit. They had 
been married seven years and have a 2-year-old son, Jesse James. 

Howard, 25, and Woods have been living together for two years. 
She had a daughter by him last month. She also has a 4-year-old son 
by a British textile dealer and is waiting for her divorce so she and 
Woods can marry. They recently moved into a mansion in Bel Air, 
Calif., formerly owned by swimmer-actress Esther Williams. 

Love among the paintbrushes means j-a-i-l 

MILWAUKEE— A man and woman have been fined $75 each for 
allowing passion to interrupt their painting. 

Their troubles began when police in suburban Wauwatosa were 
called to investigate a report of a possible break-in at a vacant house 
one night last summer. 

Instead of burglars, they found the couple making love in a 
bedroom. The two had been hired to paint the building. 

But since they were not married, Sgt. Byron Naegel arrested them 
on charges of lewd and lascivious conduct. They were fined Wed- 
nesday night after being convicted by Municipal Judge John 
Pfanner still following an hour-long trial at which three police of- 
ficers testified. 

The couple, who were not identified for reasons of privacy, said 
they would appeal the convictions to Circuit Court and criticized 
police, saying their privacy had been invaded. 

When the 23-year-old man asked Pfannerstill if the convictions 
meant he and the woman, 21, could go to jail for making love, the 
judge replied, "Probably ... if you don't pay the fine." 



Eye doctors! Pot luck for glaucoma research 

WASHINGTON— The National Eye Institute is looking for eye 
doctors willing to test marijuana in treating patients with glaucoma. 

The institute said Thursday that marijuana can reduce eye 
pressure in lab animals, healthy individuals and in some glaucoma 
patients. 

But it said there is no evidence yet to show whether it actually can 
prevent loss of vision from glaucoma, and it wants to sponsor more 
research to settle the issue. 

The marijuana used in the studies would be in the form of eyedrops 
and pills containing the active chemical ingredients. In that form the 
substance shouldn't affect a patient in the same way as would 
smoking a marijuana cigarette. 



WeatReF 



KANSAS STATE COLLEOIAN, Frt., Pwwnbf 1.1 Wl 

FmHA rural development 
loans reach $200 million 



Loans for rural development during fiscal 
year 1978 reached a record high of more 
than $200 million, of which $3,541,280 is 
designated for Geary, Riley, Wabaunsee 
and Pottowatomie Counties, a rural credit 
agency of the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture reported. 

The agency, the Kansas Farmers Home 
Administration (FmHA), reported a total of 
124 loans are outstanding in the Manhattan 
area for fiscal year 1978. Of these loans, 
most are to be used for farm programs with 
six allocated for industrial and commercial 
use, state FmHA Director John Denyer 
said. 

Of the total loan figure, all but $5,402,170 
are loans repayable with interest. Nearly 
$100 million are farm loans; housing loans 
accounted for more than $68 million; $13.6 
million is used for community facilities 
improvement, and about 12 million for 
business-industrial financing. 

Donna Riffel, representative of the 
Abilene office of the American Agricultural 



Movement, said the loans to farmers were 
necessary, but would like to see the day 
farmers can do without government 
assistance. 

"Young, beginning farmers and even 
some of the more established farmers need 
this money to survive. There is just no two 
ways about it," she said. 

"Farmers are generally an independent 
group of people, and would rather do without 
government loans or supports. But until 
prices in the marketplace rise, the farmer is 
dependent on these and other loans." 

Riffel said a big misconception by the 
genera] public is associated with these 
loans. 

"These loans are not giveaways. Farmers 
are expected to pay them back, with in- 
terest," she said. 



GIVE TO YOUR 

American Cancer Society 

, Ftghi earner 

•with a chtckup 

and a, (htck. 



TEXACO 

takes you to the Met 
for an enjoyable 
experi ence 

All live on radio, direct from 
the Metropolitan Opera House 

SATURDAY RADIO SCHEDULE 



DATE 
1978 

Dec. 2 

Dec. 9 

Dec. 16 

Dec. 23 

Dec. 30 
1979 

Jan. 6 

Jan. 13 

Jan. 20 

Jan. 27 

Feb. 3 

Feb. 10 

Feb. 17 

Feb. 24 

Mar. 3 

Mar. 10 

Mar. 17 

Mar. 24 

Mar. 31 

Apr. 7 

Apr. 14 



OPERA 



COMPOSER CT. 



BARTERED BRIDE Smetana l:OOP.M. 

CARMEN Bizet 12:30 P.M. 

AIDA Verdi 1:00 P.M. 

HANSEL and GRETEL Humperdinck 1:00 P.M. 

ELEKTRA Strauss 1:00 P.M. 



TOSCA 
DIALOGUES of the 

CARMELITES 
DON PASQUALE 
LU1SA MILLER 
WERTHER 

MADAMA BUTTERFLY 
DIEZAUBERFLOETE 
DON CARLO 
R1GOLETTO 
ARIADNE aufNAXOS 
NORMA 

EUGENE ONEGIN 
BILLY BUDD 

DER FLIEGENDE 
HOLLAENDER 
PARSIFAL 



Puccini 1:00 P.M. 



Poulenc 

Donizetti 

Verdi 

Massenet 

Puccini 

Mozart 

Verdi 

Verdi 

Strauss 

Bellini 

Tchaikovsky 

Britten 

Wagner 
Wagner 



1:00 P.M. 
1:00 P.M. 
1:00 P.M. 
1:00 P.M. 
1:00 P.M. 
1:00 P.M. 
12:00 Noon 
1:00 P.M. 
1:00 P.M. 
1:00 P.M. 
1 :00 P.M. 
1 :00 P.M. 

1:00 P.M. 
12:00 Noon 



BROUGHT TO YOU FOR THE 39TH CONSECUTIVE SEASON BY 



< 



Today will be increasingly cloudy with highs in the mid 50s, and a 
30 percent chance of rain tonight. Saturday will be cloudy with a 
chance of rain, and highs in the 40s. 



Schedule Subject to Change 



SPECIAL LIVE TELEVISION PRODUCTIONS ON 
PUBLIC BROADCASTING SERVICE 

Tosca- December 19, 1978 (Tuesday Evening) 
Luisa Miller- Ja nuary 20, 1979 ( S aturday Evening) 

Please send quiz questions to Texaco Opera Quiz, 
135 East 42nd Street, New York, New York 10017 

TUNE IN RADIO KM AN 1350 



Opinions 



Up your optimism 

"Jesus Christ, I get tired of hearing everybody bitching all the 
time," he said. "I wish everybody would just shut up and stop 
complaining for a change." 

If I had a nickel for every time I've heard someone say that, I 
could afford to buy President Acker's office. Hardly a day goes by 
that someone doesn't wish his neighbor would keep quiet and take 
life's punches square on the chin without a whimper. Probably the 
most remembered expression everybody's father said was, 
"Nobody said life was fair." Very true, but what Dad forgot to say 
was you don't have to take it lying down. 

An optimist isn't worth a damn. His philosophy of "things aren't so 
bad" never righted a wrong or moved a mountain. The sunny side of 
the street is for the complacent clods who are willing to allow God, 
Government and Apple Pie to run their lives so they don't have to 
take the responsibility. They look for the bright side of things so they 
won't have to work to change the dark clouds. 

A pessim^tyt twqrth his weight in season basketball tickets. The 
people»;tt»aft |b'jsrory tells us were great were pessimistic about 
everything. Martin Luther King Jr. wasn't known for sitting around 
saying, "Well, it's not that bad." John Steinbeck didn't write about 
private eyes and sex to make money. I challenge anyone to name a 
person who is worth his salt who doesn't complain. 

The pessimists of the world were born when something broke an 
optimist's rose-colored glasses. After a lifetime of wading through 
clear water, he finally began looking for the muck at the bottom of 
the pond because he realized there will always be muck in his way. 

Don't call me a pessimist if you want to insult me; I'll take it as a 
compliment. 

DOUGLASS DANIEL 
Editorial Editor 

The end is near 



And the man said, "I want it funny, I want 
it in one hour, and I want it 50 lines. 50 lines, 
do you bear? not 49, not 51, but 50. Got it, 
worm?" 

Well, with this amazing amount of war- 
mth and understanding heaped upon one's 



Rand y Shuck" 



head, coupled with the libera) time and 
space allotment, how can a person err? 

With a joyous heart, one happily toddles to 
the typewriter and creates. Right? 

Right! Tell us another one. What a nice 
man the editor is. What a kind person— that 
short, hairy, near-sighted troll of vile 
vicissitudes and questionable parentage. So 
he wants funny , does he? 

Obviously the man fails to take into ac- 
count that "funny" is a misnomer for this 
stage of the semester. 

Thanksgiving may have been a holiday of 
joy and hope to the survivor types at 
Plymouth Rock, but to the college student it 
means only 24 days of madness before the 
black curtain of doom falls on the semester. 

Desperation time. Right? 

Time to look up that prof., what was his 
name? Higby? Harness? Oh, yes. Hughes it 
was, so you can hit him with "But honest, I 
was sure this was an independent study 
class." 

Time to hunt up that weighty stack of 
drop-add slips you have stashed. 



Time to steel yourself for that final the 
instructor said would be, "Loose and lethal, 
so wear your armor and bring your own 
transfusions." 

Time to squash your pipsqueak roommate 
who for the five-thousandth time today has 
cried to you about that pamphlet he still has 
to struggle through for music appreciation, 
his high-pitched whines threatening to 
precipitate the mountain of unread volumes 
on your study shelf upon your dizzy head. 

This is the time that students adopt that 
hunted look. The look that comes over the 
rabbit just before the jaws of the dog close 
on its back. 

Noticed the look? 

It's on the faces of the majority of us. If 
looking too closely at your fellow con- 
demned makes you nervous, then look into 
the mirror. After the initial swoon or 
scream, whichever seems appropriate, look 
again. 

Note the slack jaw, the glazed, filmy eyes, 
the chic black smudges under the eye. 

"Doctor, can you explain the look of ab- 
ject terror on this young person's face?" 

Sure, it's a malady known to us in the 
profession as the "My God! I've got two 
month's work to do and one hour to do it in, 
my parents (wife, husband, family, self) is 
going to kill me, syndrome." 

Now what to do in these last 24 days. Well, 
you could stop worrying and start working 
or you could do like myself and rel... 
"LISTEN, you idiot! I specifically said 50 
lines!" 



*g Collegian 



Friday, December 1, 1978 



(USPS If) 0101 



THE collegian Is published by student Publications, Inc . Kansas Staff University, daily except Saturday, 
Sundays, holidays and vacation periods 

O F F I C E S a re in the north wing of Kedtle Hall, phone S3] 4555 

SECOND CLASS postage paid at Manhattan. Kama IM HI. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: S15, one calendar year, S7 SO, one semester 

THE COLLEGIAN functions in a legally autonomous relationship with the University and is written and edited By 
students se r v I ng t he U n I ver sit y com m un i t y 

Paul Rhode*, Editor 
Terry Brungardt, Advertising Manager 

Jett Anderson, Lisa Sanomeyer 

Jart Davison, Dave Hughes 

Douglass Daniel 

Scott Stuckey 

Jim Gibbons 

Harvey Perritt 

Grant Sanborn 

CampusVutietin Coordinator ■ ■ ■ Julie Doll 

City Editor PerynCominsky 

SCA Editor 



Managing Editors 

News Editors 

Editorial Editor 

Assistant Editorial Editor 
Sports Editor 
Assistant Sports Editor 
Features Editor 



Arts and Entertainment Editor 
Review Editor 
Copy Editors 
Photo Editor 
Staff Writers 

Stall Photographers 

Assistant Advertising Manager 



Karen vmlng 
Diane Gomolas 
Scott Forma 
Mike Hurd, Phyllis Groin 

Pete Soma 

Cindy Cox, Cindy Frlesen, Kent Gaston. Carol Holstead 

Kim Meyer, Beccy Tanner, Diane Johnson. Carol Wright, Debbie Rhem 

Tom Bell, Craig Chandler, Dave Kaup, Cort Anderson, Bruce Buchanan. 

Sue Pfannmuller, Nancy Zogleman. Scott Llebler, Bo Rader 

Andrea Carver 




Letters 



j \ oil 



Renovation of buildings 
important for campus beauty 



Editor. 

Lately our University president, Duane 
Acker, has started a campaign to preserve 
University landmarks. I believe we should 
support the president in his efforts, One of 
the reasons I chose to go to school here was 
the atmosphere that K -State and its 
beautiful stone buildings offer. I think the 
renovation of Anderson is a good place to 
start; however, we must avoid the 
deterioration of other University land- 
marks. 

Van Zile Hall was the first dorm built on 
this campus and during the years it has 
developed a strong tradition. Since 1926 Van 
Zile has offered its residents a family-type 
atmosphere. 

The fate of this tradition is now being 
weighed against the value of the dollar. 

Cool it, Willie 

Editor. 

K -State has fine men's and women's 
basketball teams of which it can justly be 
proud. I am an overseas student in my first 
semester at K-State, and I attended two 
basketball games this week. On each oc- 
casion, 1 felt the occasional attempts by 
Willie the Wildcat and an otherwise faultless 
K-State Marching Band to distract the 
opposition while they are shooting a set goal 
most unnecessary. 

While I appreciate that it is apparently 
not an American tradition to applaud good 
play and points scored by the opposition in 
and sport, I feel that the behavior I wit- 
nessed was in very poor taste, and is 
something our teams, and our purple pride, 
could well do without. 

Heather Spence 
graduate student in institutional 
management 



Housing, headed by chairperson Frith, is 
attempting to shut down Van Zile Hall's food 
service. As in all living groups, eating 
together facilitates the development of the 
family environment more than any other 
factor. 

If Van Zile residents are forced to eat at 
the large food complexes, they will lose their 
small hall identity. 

My objectives, like President Acker's, are 
that we establish a pattern of restoration of 
landmark buildings such as Van Zile. My 
hopes are that the housing committee will 
realize the maintenance of life inside lan- 
dmark buildings is as important to K-State 
as maintaining the physical structure of 
these beautiful buildings. 

Steve Hildebrand 
sophomore in agronomy 

To whom 
it may concern 

Editor, 

To whoever resold my football ticket: 
Does F.O. mean anything to you? 

Lisa Martin 
sophomore in fashion marketing 



The Collegian welcomes letters from 
readers concerning the content of the 
paper, or any comments on either 
national or local issues. 

All letters must be signed and include 
proper identification, including title or 
classification, major and telephone 
number. No anonymous letters will be 
printed. 

Letters may be submitted (preferably 
typed) in Kedzie 103 or the editorial desk 
in the newsroom. 




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Crawford, There'5 
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<• Campus patrol's skills: 
notes, pistols, first aid 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri., December 1.1978 



O' 



By KAREN CARLSON 
Collegian Reporter 

Campus cops— What image pope into your 
mind when you think about K-State's 
patrolmen? 

For a patrolman to join the campus 
Security and Traffic force, he or she must 
undergo tests, training, first aid courses and 
target shooting. 

Qualifying to become a patrolman with K- 
State's Security and Traffic force, beside 
the general requirements, demands much 
training, before and after a prospective 
patrolman is hired for the job, according to 
Paul Nelson, chief of Security and Traffic. 

A patrolman must be 21 years or older, 
have a high school diploma, pass a civil 
service test and go through a basic law 
enforcement training class, Nelson said. 

"From the people who pass the Civil 
Service test a list of the top five scorers are 

New ceiling boosts 
natural gas prices 

WASHINGTON <AP>— New federal price 
ceilings on natural gas taking effect Friday 
are expected to boost the average 
household's gas bills by about $14 next year, 
to a total of nearly $300. 

The higher price ceilings are included in 
legislation, approved by Congress after an 
18-month battle and signed by President 
Carter Nov. 9, that is intended to provide 
added incentives for industry to explore for 
new natural gas supplies. 

Over the long haul, however, residential 
gas bills could rise as much as 42 percent by 
1985, when federal price regulation of newly 
discovered gas is removed entirely. 

Meanwhile, decisions to be made in the 
next couple of months are likely to result in 
further, increases in the cost of gasoline, 
heating oil and other petroleum products. 

How much will depend largely on the size 
of price increases ordered by OPEC, the 
foreign oil producers' cartel, which is 
meeting in December. 

Under the new National Energy Act, the 
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is 
still drafting nationwide regulations 
governing previously unregulated intrastate 
gas and 25 separate pricing categories. 

Ken Williams, deputy director of FERC's 
office of pipeline and producer regulation, 
estimated in a telephone interview that the 
new price ceilings set by Congress will cost 
residential gas users about $1.7 billion in the 
first year. 



sent to Security and Traffic, they are con- 
tacted and the interviewing begins," Nelson 
said. "As near as I can remember three 
people were hired last year." 

If the job applicant is hired, he must at- 
tend the basic law enforcement training 
class given in Topeka, which lasts from four 
to six weeks, Nelson said. 

In basic training every aspect of police 
work is covered. Learning to take notes is 
the first skill taught since most of a 
patrolman's working day is spent writing 
out tickets and writing up reports, according 
to Gary Gillaspie, lieutenant of the night 
shift. 

OTHER SUBJECTS covered are the U.S. 
Constitution, police radio methods, 
collecting evidence and search and seizure 
techniques. These are just a few of the 
subjects covered, but are important in 
everyday police work, Gillaspie said. 

"Refresher courses are often given on 
search and seizure procedures because 
search and seizure codes change so often," 
he said. 

Each patrolman on campus has com- 
pleted a course in basic first aid, and, 
recently, all members of the force com- 
pleted a course in cardiopulmonary 
resuscitation (CPR), Gillaspie said. 

CPR is a course sponsored by the Red 
Cross and teaches people how to treat 
someone who stops breathing. 

The continued training for the officers on 
campus is conducted once a month, Nelson 
said. The officers are given a questionnaire 
of what they would like to learn more about 
and arrangements are made for a qualified 
speaker to talk to them. 

Officers also are required to qualify with a 
pistol. This consists of target shooting, point 
shooting with strong and weak hand, and 
being able to fire five rounds in a sequence 
of: empty, reload and fire within 25 
seconds, Gillaspie said. 

"Then you are qualified," he said. 

NELSON SAID more women are applying 
to become police officers and he said he is 
pleased with this. Two women work at 
Security and Traffic on the evening shift 
now, Nelson said. 

"I would rather have women handle 
things such as rape cases," Nelson said. "I 
think it would make the victim feel more at 
ease." 

The basic law enforcement class prepares 
the officers well for the job, but some of the 
older officers haven't taken the class 
because it wasn't required until July 1970, 
Nelson said. 

Alden Miller, patrolman for the day shift 
since 1969, believes he's not at a disad- 
vantage from not taking the course because 
"experience is the best teacher." he said. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Frt., Dec«mt»r 1, 1978 



Well folks, Thanksgiving is behind us, the 
leftover turkey has all been snarfed and it's 
time to round the curve and head into the 
home stretch. 

Speaking of Thanksgiving, I was a bit 
disappointed that no one sent me any 
questions about the festive food holiday. I 
happen to know a lot of information about 
Thanksgiving.that I had hoped to share with 
the world, but then, so did the Pilgrims— and 
look where it got them. 

Since this is my next-to-last column for the 
semester, I thought it only best to warn the 
world that there's only one more chance to 
have your most pressing questions an- 
swered by Snafu and his infamous brother in 
Hays. If you can't think of any questions, 
don't sweat it— you've got enough to worry 
about deciding what to buy the folks for 
Christmas. 

Snafu, 

What are the words to the school alma 
mater? U.K. 

BR. my friend, you're in luck. I had a 
tough time locating the words in the football 
program (where someone told me they 
could be found) so I hit up a true K-State 
sports fanatic who gladly recited the words 
to the first verse and chorus for me. 

She told me these are the only words of the 
alma mater that are ever sung (alluding 
that there is also a second or third verse), 
but judging from the ridiculousness of the 
first verse's lyrics, I'm glad that's all that's 
ever sung. 

Here it is, B.R. Clear your vocal cords and 
get ready to sing along with Mitch : 

I know a spot that I love full well 

"Tis not in forest, nor yet in dell 

Ever it holds me with magic spell 

I think of thee, Alma Mater. 

K-S-U , we'll carry the banner high 
K-S-U, long, long may the colors fly 
Loyal to thee, our children will swell the 



cry: 



Hail, hail, hail, Alma Mater. 



Snafu, 

How fast can a ring-ntcked pheasant run? 
B.M. 

Well B.M., a pheasant can run pretty 
damn fast, that's all I can say. As a matter 
of fact , they run so fast that nobody seems to 
have been able to clock them. I called 
several places to try to find out. 

Bill Htavachick of the Kansas Fish and 
Game Commission said he could only guess. 
He guessed they run about 20 to 25 mph. 

I wasn't satisfied with a guess, so I called 
the South Dakota Game Fish and Parks 
Department's regional office in Rapid City. 
The ring-necked pheasant is South Dakota's 
state bird, and I figured if anyone would 
know, they would. They didn't. 

One person there told me they run about 20 
mph. But, he must not have been too sure of 
himself because he refused to give me his 
name. 



Not one to be beaten, I asked my brother 
in Hays to hop in his Jeep, chase one, and 
watch the speedometer. He did, but the 
pheasant ran into a fence row and my 
brother (watching the speedometer) also 
ran into the fence row. When the wreckage 
was pulled from the trees, the speedometer 
was stuck on 98 mph. 

My brother was so mad, he shot the 
pheasant. He did give me this bit of i it- 
formation. The bird fell to the ground ac- 
celerating at a rate of 32 feet per second per 
second. . • 

Snafu, 

We hear all this talk about gay people 
these days, but are there gay animals, too? 
J.H.andB.H. 

I'm glad you asked me that. Yes, there are 
gay animals, most notably the lark. 
Everyone at some time in their life hears 
about "gay larks." I think most of them live 
in England, though. 

Closer to home, there is another species of 
our fine feathered faggots known in this 
area as "Gayhawks" and indiginous to the 
area of northeast Kansas. In Riley County 
alone, there are smatterings of this species, 
most of which have joined in an organization 
known as BARC— the Bestiality Alliance of 



Riley County. Select few members of the 
canine family are included. 

On a more serious note, yes, there is 
homosexuality among the lower members of 
the evolutionary scale, including students 
down the river. While the gay movement 
among animals is nowhere near the 
proportions of that in San Francisco or 



Lawrence, cases of homosexuality have 
been verified in virtually every mammalian 
species, including cats, dogs, horses, cattle, 
etc and research is presently being con- 
ducted to determine if human influences on 
animals (i.e., captivity) have any effect on 
the incidence of homosexuality among 
animals. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frt, 



1,1978 




Researchers seek famous siblings 



CINCINNATI <AP)-If youhavea famous 
brother or sister, a group of University of 
Cincinnati researchers is looking for you. 

Joe) Milgram, of the department of 
educational leadership, started thinking 
about his relationship with his own brother 
Stanley, a prominent psychologist. Now he 
wants siblings to help him discover whether 



they or their more famous relatives have 
better relationships with their parents, 
whether they think luck or ability brought 
their brothers or sisters success, and how 
they define success. 

Milgram and Helgola Ross, a social 
psychologist, are seeking people through 
newspaper advertisements and college 
alumni magazines. 



Stalf photo by Sue Plannmuller 



What was that? 

Thomacina Burnett (right), a member of the ninth grade chorus at 
Manhattan Junior High looks confused as Heidi Teichgraeber, senior in 
music education and student teacher, explains part of the junior high's 
Christmas program. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frf., D*c«mb*r 1, 1978 



Arts & Entertainment 



K-Stater, 16— 



'Acting is life' 



By CAROL WRIGHT 
Staff Writer 

At 16, Damien Semanitzky already knows 
what she wants. 

Semanitzky has been active in the fine 
arts since she was four years old. Her 
father, Mischa Semanitzky, an associate 
professor of music at K -State, got her 
started on the violin. She is now not only a 
violinist, but a flutist, dancer, singer and 
actress as well. 

Semanitzky, a sophomore in speech and 
theater, came to K-State last January after 
returning from the Inter lochen Arts 
Academy in Michigan during her junior 
year in high school. 

Semanitzky said she left the academy due 
to regulations which prevented her from 
graduating from there, and also because of 
its lack of excellence in training her for a 
theatrical career. 

"The reason I stayed at K -State was 
because I found the kind of training I 
needed," she said. "As an actress, I found 
Dr. Paul Roland who is, in my estimation, 
one of the finest teachers I have ever met. 

"He was able to make me see the art in 
myself, and therefore the potential I have as 
an actress." 

AT FIRST, Semanitzky directed her in- 
terests to dance. She studied with Ronnie 
Mahler for two years, and with Tom 
Steinhoff of the Topeka Ballet Company this 
summer. But she said she realized the 
sacrifice she would have to make combining 
dance with her devotion to theater. 

"I had the idea of going into professional 
dance," she said. "I was seriously con- 
sidering going out to Pittsburgh, Boston or 
New York— the classic places. 

"As an artist and person, my acting was 
becoming far too important to me. I was 
starting to make some personal breaks." 

She said that of all the performing arts, 



acting satisfies and enhances her artistic 
drive the most. 

"Acting, for me, is life. My life definitely 
is a basis for my acting." 

When she is acting or on stage, 
Semanitzky said she tries to have the 
audience grasp the beauty of her art so they 
might see beauty in themselves. 

"I believe one of the main problems 
people have today is that they basically do 
not like themselves," she said. "They're 
constantly looking for outside sources to tell 
them, 'Hey. you're all right,' without ever 
looking inside themselves and finding this 
out." 

IN ADDITION to keeping up with acting 
and completing other course assignments, 
Semanitzky said she has been practicing for 
an audition this Sunday to play concertos 
with the KSU Symphony Orchestra next 
semester. 

Semanitzky said she Tits in at K State and 
is accepted by students and professors. 

"A lot of times, I end up being the class 
leader in some ways because my 
background is varied with arts and 
academics like chemistry, biology, physics 
and algebra," she said. "I always have 
something to contribute. I end up being 
looked up to. I consider myself lucky to be in 
college at this point. 

"I'm basically respected by my teachers. 
I came here with the idea I'd be patted on 
the head, but that's not true at all." 

While Semanitzky enjoys acting, she said 
she would like to concentrate in stage 
management, and possibly do some 
directing. 

"After I get my B.A., I want to go where 
the action is," she said. "I see myself as a 
businesswoman because I have a talent for 
organizing things. I see myself in 
professional stage and theater 
management." 




Staff photo by Craig Chandler 

SOPHOMORE AT 16... Damien Semanitzky (left), 16-year-old sophomore 
in music and theater, is accompanied by Stephen Goacher, instructor in 
woodwinds, during a flute practice session. 

Kosinski scores hit 



By SCOTT FARINA 
Review Editor 

Dark, brooding, mysterious, grotesquely 
poetic . 

Trying to describe the novels of Jerzy 
Kosinski is like trying to describe the smell 
of spring: you can come close, but you can 
never completely capture the essence. 

Kosinski 's latest book is "Blind Date," 
now out in paperback. His five other novels 



Colle gian Review 



j 



also are being reissued in paperback to 
coincide with the release of "Blind Date." 




Belly dancer likes 
dance form, feeling 

By ALYSON MACK 
Collegian Reporter 
Belly dancing is more than showing off your navel. 
To Joanne Dudley, professionally known as Nahid, it is a 
serious art form. 

"The exercise and emotional release is very important to 
me," Dudley said. "Also, I am able to meet other people with a 
similar interest." 
But Dudley, a 35-year-old mother of four, is involved in more 



*■ Off-hours 



Staf l photo by Cort Anderson 

DANCING DIRECTOR.. Joanne Dudley (Nahid) 
prepares for tonight's belly dancing show "An 
Evening of Middle Eastern Dance" to be presented by 
Dudley's UFAA belly dancing class. 



than belly dancing. She is a substitute teacher, a Girl Scout 
troop leader, and is involved in activities at Fort Riley where 
her husband is employed. 

Dudley, who was into ballet for ten years, first got involved 
in belly dancing four years ago when she took a YMCA class in 
Kansas City. She has been performing professionally for a 
year and a half, has been teaching for two years, and is 
currently teaching a belly dancing class for University of Man 
(UFM>. 

DUDLEY IS also producing "An Evening of Middle Eastern 
Dance," a belly dancing show, at 7:30 tonight in Williams 
Auditorium, Umberger Hall. The show, a benefit for UFM, will 
feature members of Dudley's UFM class and will spotlight 
Nejat. a professional belly dancer from Lawrence from whom 
Dudley takes private lessons. 

"I have invested a lot of time and energy into what I do," 
Dudley said. "I like the dance form, the freedom of expression, 
and I like the feeling of the dance." 

Dudley said the names that professional belly dancers use 
serve as symbols or meanings for the dancers. 

"You choose it < the name) because it suits you or your dance 
personality," she said. "When you start performing it should 
fit the overall mood of the performance. The name serves a 
purpose... it is part of your entire image." 

She said the origin of the belly dancer's costume comes from 
the time when a young girl would dance in the marketplace 
and receive coins as payment. The girl would then sew the 
coins onto her costume and, as she became older, she would 
continue to sew on the coins and accumulate wealth. By the 
time she was of marrying age, she had quite a dowry on her 
outfit. 



To understand "Blind Date" and the other 
Kosinski novels (with the exception of 
"Being There") one must understand about 
Kosinski, 

Polish-born, Kosinski spent his early 
childhood fleeing from one Eastern 
European village to another during World 
War II. Reunited with his family after the 
armistice, Kosinski was so traumitized by 
his experiences that he was mute for five 
years. 

Kosinski later became a member of "the 
Party," doing his communistic duty, but he 
watched for a chance to escape to the West 
and eventually succeeded. 

MUCH OF Kosinski 's work tends to be 
autobiographical, and much of it is violent 
and unpleasant. But it is gripping reading, 
not because of the violence, but because 
Kosinski is such a powerful storyteller. 

The protagonist of "Blind Date" is George 
Levanter, a former Party member who has 
escaped to the West. Levanter is part 
Kosinski and part fiction, and sometimes it 
is hard to tell where one leaves off and the 
other begins. 

Levanter works as an investment coun- 
selor but that is a cover. He is really a soiled 
Avenging Angel. His work and his travel put 
him in contact with political types of many 
nations and what Levanter wants is to find 
ways to get political prisoners released. 

Sometimes his work backfires. He 
corrects an embarrassing mistake in the 
English translation of the speech to be given 
by a South American dictator, in return for 
the release of two prisoners. Later, he 
learns the interpreter is in jail being tor- 
tured. 

SEVERAL TIMES Levanter resorts to 
killing. He blows up a ski gondola carrying 
the deputy minister of internal affairs of a 
fictional Arabian country He impales with a 
sword the New York agent for the secret 
East European police who have imprisoned 
one of Levanter's friends. 

The book is anecdotal in style, with a 
number of flashbacks to Levanter's life in 
Eastern Europe. Surprisingly, there are 
some humorous scenes in this book, a device 
Kosinski usually avoids. 

"Blind Date" continues Kosinski 's growth 
as an "existential cowboy," as he has been 
referred to. Readers unfamiliar with him, 
though, are advised not to start with his 
latest novel 

"Being There" is a slim, very accessible, 
humorous look at how an uneducated gar- 
dener becomes a candidate for president of 
this country, thanks to the media. It is 
highly recommended. 

At the same time, "Being There" is unlike 
all the other Kosinski novels. Start with 
"Painted Bird," his account of his wan- 
dering war years, then proceed to "Cock- 
pit," and then to "Blind Date." They are 
works that will stay with you for a long time. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frl., December 1 , 1 978 



^'Damnation Alley' 



A movie to regret 



By CAROL HOLSTEAD 
Staff Writer 

If you like old-time thrillers with giant 
monster-like reptiles, bad special effects 
and unbelievable plots, then you will like 
"Damnation Alley." 

This movie is similar to the older films 
except it is set in the future after the third 
world war. 

"Damnation Alley" starts out at an Air 
Force base somewhere in the West. Within 



Colle gian Review 



five minutes World War 111 has begun and 
ended. It is a nuclear war of course, and as a 
result the earth is tilted slightly on its axis. 
This jarring of the earth plus the effects of 
fallout leave the earth barren and dry. The 
sky becomes an atomic storm 

Two years after the war the Air Force 
base blows up leaving only four people: Jan- 
Michael Vincent, Paul Winfield and George 
Peppard, all officers, and another officer 
who dies within the first 20 minutes of the 
movie. 

The plot, what there is of it, begins when 
the four decide to take the Air Force's secret 
landrovers and head across the country to 
Albany, New York, because some radio 
transmission from there has indicated there 
may be some other people alive. 

They encounter some problems on the 
way, including huge crayfish and man- 
eating cockroaches. They also find, 
naturally, a woman and a boy. 

FINALLY, THERE is a huge atomic 
storm of some type which rights the earth on 
its axis, solving all the problems. Suddenly 



Events 



Tw«IIMi Nlfhf: Manhattan Civic Theatre production, 8 
p.m tonight, 4.30 p. m dinner theater Saturday, 7 p. m 
Sunday. *T1 Houston 

UFM Fine Artt-Cratt* Sala: » am. to* p.m. Friday and 
*** Saturday. UFM House. 1121 ThurMon. 

Sill Bracker Exhibtt: starts Sunday, continues through 
Dec. ti, Ambry Gallery, West Sladolm Bracker Is head ot 
ttteK.U. Oept ot Ceramics. 

Frank Sldortshy Recital: saxophone. Faculty Artist 
Scries, I p. m Sunday. All F alths Chapel 

collegium Moticitm: student and faculty Renaissance 
music group, 8p ,fit Monday, All Faiths Chapel. 

UPC CoHeehouse Nooner : featuring Sally Shutter and 
LynnKlriahos. noon to I p.m. Tuesday. Catskeller. 

Symphonic Wind Ensemble; I p.m. Tuesday, McCain 
Auditorium. 

U PC Arts and Cram Sale: 10 a - m. to * p.m. Wednesday 
through Friday Dec B, K 5 u Ballrooms. K State Union. 

Mike Gachei Student Recital: trumpet, 8 p.m. Wed- 
nesday, All Faiths Chapel. 

From Heaven to Hell: K State Players production. B p.m. 
Thursday through Saturday Dec 1. Purple Masque 
Theatre, East Stadium 

Glee Club In Concert; men's and women's glee, B p.m. 
Thursday, AH Faiths Chapel 

KSU permanent Art Collection Exhibit: through Dec. 15, 
K Slate Union Arl Gallery. 

Damnation Allay: starring Jan Michael Vincent, UPC 
Feature Film, rated PG, 7 and »: 30 p.m Friday and 
Saturday. Forum Hall, SI IS. 

CatBailou: starring Jane Fonda, UPC Feature Film, 
rated G. 7 p.m. Sunday, Forum Hall, SI. 

Badlands: UPC Issues and Ideas Film, 7 p.m. Wed 
nesday. Little Theatre, SI 

The Tall Blonde Man With One Slack Shoe: U PC 

Kaleidoscope Film, Thursday, 3 30 pm mtheLittle 
Theatre. 7 M p m in Forum Hall. II 7S 



IRAN 

The Next 
Vietnam 

Iranian Students Association 

at Manhattan commemorates 

the students' movement by 

presenting: 
choir, lecture & discussion, 
slide show and short movie 
concerning the recent mass 
uprising of Iranian people. 

7 : 00 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 2 

at the International Center 

Open to the Public 



there is instant vegetation, cows, horses and 
people coming from nowhere. Everyone 
lives happily ever after. 

One of the worst faults in the movie is the 
screenplay. Not only is the plot boring and 
predictable, there is absolutely nothing for 
the actors to work with— the characters are 
shallow and undeveloped. 

Vincent seems to be playing himself 
delivering someone else's lines. Peppard 
tries to create some emotional change 
within his character but his attempt is ob- 
vious. Winfield does the most acceptable job 
with his part, but unforluntely he gets eaten 
by the man eating cockroaches halfway 
through the movie. 

The other main problem is the poor 
special effects. The atomic disturbance in 
the sky is so fake it could make the audience 
laugh. 

The marquee for "Damnation Alley" says 
"It's more than a movie, it's an adventure 
you will never forget." More appropriately, 
it is less than a movie and an adventure you 
will regret. 




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ARTS and CRAFTS FAIR 

Dee. 6, 7 end 8 

K.S.U. BALLROOM 

10-4 p.m. 





FIRST NATIONAL 

Little Apple 10,000 Meters 
Road Race & 2 Mile Fun Run 




Entry Fee 

$3,00 if received or post 

1978. 

$7.00 if received after November 29, 1978. Entry fee 

must accompany entry form Aid is not refundable. 

Eligibility j£» 

The First National Little Apple Road Race arid Win 
Run is open to all runners and joggers regardless of 
age or se*. Everyone is highly encouraged to. par 
ticipttte. 

Race Divisions # 

Tea divbions each for men and women 
12 and under 
13 to IS 
16lo 18 
19 to 29 
30 to 34 
35 to 39 
40 to 44 
45 to 49 
50 to 54 
55 and over 







EvjNt Schedule 

^ (Event will be conducted without regard to weather.) 
December 2, 1978 
10:30 a.m.— 11:30 a.m. Registration and securing 

of pre-race information 

J2j00 Start of both races 

1:30 p.m Awards presentation 

NOTE: Registration will not be accepted after 11:30 
a.m. Course maps will be available on race day. Race 
will be conducted on paved road With no traffic. 



• • • 



10,000 Meters Road Race (6.2 miles): 

This event is primarily for runners. Ail awards 
previously described are for the finishers in this 
event. Competitive runners are urged to enter this 
event. 





Awards 



10,000 meters road race— certificate redeemable for 
a new pair of Adidas running shoes to the eligible 
winner* of each of the men's and women's division: 
trophies for the first three places, medals for the sub- 
sequent three places (4th, 5th. & 6th); ribbons for the 
following four places (7th, 8th, 9th, & 10th) in each 
of the men's and women's divisions. 
2 mile fun run— medals for the first three places and 
ribbons to the following 7 places in each of the men's 
and women's divisions. 

Special awards will be presented to the oldest and 
youngest finisher in each event. 

Additionally, a T-shirt will be presented (only on race 
day at event site) to each participant (both runners or 
joggers) who officially enters the competition. 





2 Mile Fun Run 

This event is designed as an event for the non-highly 
competitive jogger. 



•those accepting redeemable certificates should con- 
sult with their athletic association, for possible rules 
violations regarding acceptance of merchandise. 



RACE WILL GO: RAIN, HAIL, SLEET, OR SNOWMl! 

Sponsored by the FIrat National Bank of Manhattan 

Co-Sponaored by Ballard 1 ! Sporting Good* and the KSU -Manhattan Track Club 



10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frl., D*c«mb«r 1.1978 



Winners gallery 

James Hodges, freshman in 
general, raises his hands after 
sinking the winning hoop that made 
him $25,00 richer at a basketball 
shooting contest during halftimeof 
the women's game in Ahearn Field 
House Wednesday. 

Sl»ff photo by Pete Souia 




Residents reject proposals 
at public landfill hearing 



ByJILLFORGY 
Collegian Reporter 

Four major sites chosen for a possible 
sanitary landfill met with disapproval from 
Riley County residents in a public hearing 
Thursday night. 

Sites recommended for use as landfills 
included the Hassebrock site, located one 
mile southeast of Manhattan city limits, the 
Bayer Quarry site south of the Zeandale 
area, the Stock wet I site located near the 
existing county landfill on Rosencutter Road 
and the sludge farm site east of the city. 

The sludge farm site was favored by the 
committee because it would have to be 
exavated only four feet before service could 
begin. 

Dan Hall, who lives one-half mile east of 
the sludge farm, said the road leading to the 
site was not an all-weather road and that 
trains frequently blocked access to it. 

Wilford Johnson, a tenant of the land in 
question, said the proposed land was not for 
sale. Johnson was also concerned with 



drainage problems that would arise if the 
landfill were developed on this property. 

Robert Hines, co-owner of Sunflower 
Farms Inc. located near the proposed site, 
was concered with the problems of birds and 
the diseases they could carry to his hogs. 
Hines said he had orginally selected the 
area for his hog farm because it was 
agricultural land. Hines also brought up the 
hazard of dust to his industry. According to 
Hines, his hogs could also be exposed to dust 
pneumonia. 

Many residents who live near proposed 
sites expressed doubts that drainage in the 
area would be adequate for a landfill. 



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1st Annual Christmas Pottery Sale at the 

OLDSBURG POTTERY. Olds burg. Kansas 

Sat. Dec. 2 11:00 A.M. to9:00P.M. 

Sun. Dec. 3 1 1:00 A.M. to »:Q0 P.M. 



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Beautifully Shaped 
for a Real Christmas! 





Come and See One of 

the Largest CHRISTMAS DECORATION 

Assortments in the area! 



•Unusual Decorations 
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•Musical Decorations 



•Candle Rings 
•Nativity Sets 
•Decorative Statuary 



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425 POYNTZ MANHATTAN. KANSAS 






I 



) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, FrL, Dicemlwrl, t»78 



11 



'Cats shoot for Hartman 's 300th 



Jack Hartman will try for his 300th major 
college win Saturday night at 7:35 p.m. 
against Southern Methodist University in 
Dallas, Texas. 

Hartman compiled a 144-64 record while 
at Southern Illinois and a 154-73 mark while 
at K-State. He has an overall mark of 299- 



Sports 



137, not counting his record at Coffeyville 
Junior College. 

The Wildcats are now 2-1 after losing 61-55 
to Oral Roberts Thursday in Tulsa, Okla. 
After the Southern Methodist contest, the 
'Cats will return to Ahearn Field House for 
their next four games. They will host 
Minnesota, Cal Poly-Pomona, Southern 
Illinois-Edwardsville and Montana to close 
out the home non-conference schedule. 

SMU lost to K-State 76-58 in Ahearn last 
year, a game K-State blew open in the 
second half. SMU was tied 38-38 at half time 
but -K-State scored the first bucket of the 
second half and never trailed again. 



Kolando Black man paced the 'Cats with 14 
points. 

Southern Methodist features guard Phil 
Hale, who averaged none points a game in 
the Southwest Conference last season. 

EXPECTED TO START at center for 
SMU is 6-4 Reggie Franklin, who con- 
tributed an average of 12 points per contest 
last year. He will be opposed by K-States 
Steve Soldner at 6-7. This could be one of the 
few games this season that Soldner will not 
face a taller opponent. 

But Franklin is the Mustangs' team 
captain and led the team with 59 blocked 
'shots and 28 steals last year. 

Freshman guard Billy Allen could be 
another starter for SMU. Allen was the MVP 
of the Dallas Metroplex last season, 
averaging 25 points and nine assists last 
year. He's the son of Head Coach Sonny 
Allen. . 

The Mustangs also return six other let- 
termen from a squad that finished 10-18 last 
season. However, SMU is supposed to be one 
of the most improved teams in the SWC. 
They lost their season opener to No. 1 
ranked Duke by only six points, 

K-State leads the overall series 5-1 and is 



expected to start Soldner at center, 6-7 Ed 
Nealy and 6-7 Jari Wills at forwards and 5-11 
Glenn Marshall and 6-6 Rolando Blackman 
at guards. 

"The big key will be how well our young 
bunch reacts to its first games away from 
home. That's a totally different atmosphere 
for young ballplayers trying to get their feet 



on the ground," Hartman said. "It should be 
interesting because they will provide ex- 
cellent competition." 

Blackman is K -State's leading scorer with 
an average of 16 points per contest. Fresh- 
man guard-forward Tyrone Adams should 
see considerable playing time after an 18 
point performance against Oral Roberts. 



Shootout in Texas-eager style 



Baseball's Rose 
won 't bloom in Philly 



The K-State women's basketball team 
takes to the road to take on Texas Tech 
Friday and nationally-ranked Wayland 
Baptist Saturday. 

K-State is currently 1-2 on the season after 
losing 70-62 to Long Beach in Ahearn 
Thursday. 

K-State and Texas Tech will meet for the 
first time ever. The Red Raiders were 34-11 
last season but only three players return 
from, that squad. Cheryl Greer, a junior 
center, has the most experience. The other 
returners are guard Rosemary Scott and 
center Liz Havens. Thirteen newcomers 
make up the rest of the roster. 

Wayland Baptist is ranked eighth by 
Sports Illustrated and has never lost to K- 



State. The Flying Queens defeated K-State 
60-56 in Ahearn last season. They also won 
their own Classic over Thanksgiving, 
defeating Texas Tech in one of the contests. 

Wayland Baptist returns three starters: 
Jill Rankin, top scorer last season with a 
15.6 average, Kathy Harston, a 5-10 guard 
and Valerie Godwin, a 5-11 senior forward. 
They also return five letter-winners in 
addition to eight newcomers. 

"It will be a definite upset to beat them on 
their home court," Head Coach Judy Akers 
said. "For the Cats to beat Wayland at this 
point in the schedule the best game of the 
year will probably have to be played, which 
is possible." 



PHILADELPHIA (API— The 

Philadelphia Phillies announced Thursday 
that they were no longer negotiating to 
acquire Pete Rose, baseball's aging 
superstar in search of a new uniform for 
next season. 

"We have made an offer that would have 
made Pete the highest paid player in 
Phillies' history," club owner Ruly Car- 
penter told a press conference. "Unfor- 
tunately it was not quite enough." 

The Phillies for some time had been 
considered the front runner in the Rose 
CI sweepstakes with a reported offer of $1.8 
million over three years. 

The 37-year-old Rose, who owns the 
modern NationaJ League hitting streak 
record of 44 straight games, has been 
searching for a new team since he played 
out his option after 15 years as a star in- 
fielder-outfielder with the Cincinnati Reds. 

SINCE RETURNING last week from an 
exhibition baseball tour with the Reds in 
Japan, Rose has visited Atlanta, Kansas 
City, St. Louis and Pittsburgh San Diego 
and the New York Mets also made over- 
tures, but are no longer in the running. 

Rose said the Phillies offer was "a 
tremendous one, but it wasn't what I thought 
I could get from a couple of the other ball 
clubs." 

Asked who the front runner was now, Rose 
replied, "I don't think there is a front run- 
ner. We're down to four— three in the 
National League and one in the American 
League— and I've said all along I'd like to 
stay in the National League and beat Stan 
Musial's record." 

Musiai holds the all-time National League 
record for career hits with 3,630, 

Atlanta, the St. Louis Cardinals and 
Pittsburgh are the three National League 
clubs still in the running. In the American 
League, the Kansas City Royals have been 
in contact with Rose. 

ROSE SAID he may reach a decision as 
early as Sunday and would first call all the 
teams involved before making any public 
announcement 



Earlier in the day, the New York Mets 
announced that they were withdrawing from 
the Rose competition, saying the switch- 
hitter had turned down a package deal offer 
in excess of $2 million. The Mets' offer 
amounted to $600,000 for three years, then 
five years in an off -the-field capacity. ^ 

The Pittsburgh Pirates did not talk money 
with Rose in a meeting in Columbus, Ohio, 
on Wednesday, but the Pirates will meet 
with Rose this weekend. 

"PU be talking dollars and cents with 
Pittsburgh on Saturday," Rose said at the 
news conference. 

There was no indication of what the 
Cardinals are willing to give Rose, who last 
season became the 13th player in major 
league history to reach the 3,000-hit mark. 
His 198 hits for the season gave him a total of 
3,164, ninth on baseball's all-time'hit list. He 
needs 467 more to pass Musiai. 



!'S 



Bargain BULLetin 



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Arrives Dec. 1 st at convenience food stores 

ADVERTISE FREE : Pay only if and when you sell. 

Dial 537-7067 Weekdays 9 to 5 to list ads 

Phone a ga In to cancel ad after sale— NO SALE. NO FEE 

Resale is Resourceful 



P0INSETTIA OPEN HOUSE 

Sunday Afternoon, December 3rd 





KIDNE Y FOUNOATIOH OF 

KANSAS * WESTERN MISSOURI 



SLAGLES 
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Manhattan Civic Theatre 

423 Houston 

presents 

TWELFTH NIGHT 

directed by 
Charlotte MacEarland 

Dec. I -curtain 8:00 
Dec. 2-dinner 6:30 

curtain 8:00 
Dec. 3-curtain 7:00 

Dec.8-dinner6:30 

curtain 8:00 
Dec.9-curtain8:00 
Box office 776-8591 



FORUM HALL 



FRIDAY-SATURDAY 



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YOU HAVE SEEN 
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12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fit, D»c»mb«r 1, 1978 



Jets ' star receiver 
is speedy on the field 



NEW YORK (AP)-You can cover Wesley 
Walker any way you want to, but you can't 
stop him, says the man who gets the ball to 
him. 

"The best way to cover him? Put two or 
three guys on him, and even then it may not 
work," said Matt Robinson, the New York 
Jets' young quarterback emerging as a star 
in his own right thanks in large part to 
Walker, his speedy wide receiver. 

Some receivers in the National Football 
League have caught more passes than 
Walker's 40, and a few of them have scored 
more than Walker's six touchdowns. But 
nobody's come close to eating up the yar- 
dage he does. He's averaging 24,6 yards a 
catch and leads all receivers in passing 
yardage, just 18 short of 1,000 for the season. 

"You've got to cover him either in and out 
or long or short— and either way he's gonna 
beat you," Robinson said of Walker. "I 
mean, look at last week. Miami double- 
ct vered him all day and he still burned them 
with six for a touchdown that sealed the 
Jets' 24-13 victory." 

AS A ROOKIE out of the University of 
California in 1977, Walker led the league in 



yards per catch with 21.1 and, despite oc- 
casional, lapses when he'd drop the easy 
passes, the Jets were sufficiently impressed 
with Walker's potential to trade Richard 
Carter, an eight-year pro and one of their 
all-time leading receivers, to Houston. This 
year Walker's catching every pass within 
reach—and some beyond it. 

"It seems like on the bad balls you've got 
to really concentrate every moment to catch 
'em so you're really working at it," he said. 
"The easy ones, well, sometimes you're not 
thinking about the catch, you're already 
thinking about getting six a touchdown and 
those are the ones you have a tendency to 
drop. 

"Also, last year I was unrelaxed coming 
into each game, wondering whether 1 
was going to drop a pass. I never had the 
problem in college, but I just wasn't loose 
enough. 1 found you can't worry about things 
like that, but it was my first year and I 
didn't know what to expect. I think the one 
year of experience has helped me 
tremendously." 

"He's unbelievable," Robinson said. 



Welcome back, George; 
ye for now, Ray 






LOS ANGELES, Calif. ( AP>— For a team in 
torment much of this 1978 season, the Los 
Angeles Rams have done well with much 
credit due to Coach Ray Mala v as i, a lovable 
brute who knows the score. 

Owner Carroll Rosenbloom wants a Super 
Bowl title as much as any politician wants 
the presidency. 

Chuck Knox coached the Rams to five 
National Football Conference Western 
Division championships in as many seasons 
at the helm, but he never put the Rams into 
the Super Bowl. 

Rosenbloom became disenchanted, gave 



Knox a new contract with the intimation 
that he'd like to see turn elsewhere. Knox 
took the hint and resigned to become coach 
and general manager at Buffalo for the 1978 
season. 

Rosenbloom decided on former Rams' 
coach George Allen who put on a tough 
demeanor and lasted all of two preseason 
games, both losses; he was sacked from his 
three-year contract and Malavasi was 
named to take over. 

Malavasi didn't do much criticizing until 
last Sunday's 39-19 loss to Cleveland. Then 
he said, ,"We weren't ready." 



Judge rules Stanley has right 
to cross examine witnesses 



KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP)— A federal 
judge today prohibited the Big 8 Conference 
from considering information about 
Oklahoma State football Coach Jim Stanley 
and an alleged slush fund, unless it comes 
from witnesses who may be cross-examined 
by Stanley. 

The temporary order issued by Judge 
Russell Clark also enjoined the conference 
from issuing sanctions against OSU if they 
are based on alleged activities by Stanley, 
except where proof of such activities is 
obtained through witnesses who can be 
confronted and cross-examined by the 
coach. 

Stanley, fired earlier this month as OSU 
football coach, asked the court to enjoin the 
conference and Charles M. Neinas, com- 
missioner, from conducting a hearing on the 
allegations against him without affording 



him the opportunity to confront witnesses 
against him, to elicit swom testimony and to 
call witnesses on his own behalf. 

His attorneys met today with Judge Clark 
of the U.S. District Court also to request a 
temporary restraining order that would 
delay the hearing. 

The judge indicated that a hearing 
regarding the status of the temporary 
restraining order and the request for a 
permanent injunction will be held in Kansas 
City next week. 



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AP picks college football games* 



BIRMINGHAM, Ala. ( AP)— A tale of two 
cities— New Orleans and Houston— will be 
settled in a third city, Birmingham, Ala., 
Saturday when second-ranked Alabama 
meets upset-minded Auburn. 

And the eyes and ears of a fourth 
town— Athens, Ga.— will be focused on 
Birmingham, the Magic City. 

What happens here will have a decided 
effect on the l lth- ranked Georgia Bulldogs. 
And according to the oddsmakers, it will 
take some magic to steer them toward the 
Sugar Bow) in New Orleans rather than the 
Bluebonnet Bowl in Houston. 

Perm State, the nation's No. 1-ranked 
team, is lying in wait in New Orleans— or 
will be come Jan 1— for the Southeastern 
Conference representative. Alabama can 
make it by defeating Auburn, thereby 
setting up a dream bowl game between the 
nation's 1-2 teams. 

But an Auburn victory, or a tie, will send 
Georgia to Bourbon Street regardless of 
what the Bulldogs do in their regular-season 
non-conference finale against Georgia Tech. 
Whoever doesn't go to New Orleans will 
head instead to play Stanford in Houston on 
New Year's Eve. 

"I don't think there is any doubt that both 
teams will be ready mentally," says 
Alabama Coach Bear Bryant, "ft will be a 
typical game with great emotion on both 
sides." 

But more points on the side of.. .Alabama 
31-10. 



Last week's score was 22 right and 12 
wrong for a .647 percentage, dropping the 
season count to 503-198-14— .718. 

Georgia Tech at Georgia: There's no way 
the Bulldogs can concentrate on their own 
game since their holiday fate and fare will 
be decided some 200 miles away. Upset 
Special of the Week : Georgia Tech 28-20. 



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Landlubbers study submarine design 



LAWRENCE (AP)— Incongruous as it 
may seem, aerospace engineers in lan- 
dlocked Kansas have just completed a study 
of the basic design of the submarine. 

Using aerospace principles, research 
methods and a hobbyists' model sub, Jan 
Roskam and Chuan-Tau Lan, University of 
Kansas professors of aerospace 
engineering, have learned several facts that 
could be used in future underwater vehicle 
design. 

Their preliminary study was funded by a 
$20,000 grant from the U.S. Naval Costal 
Systems Laboratory in Panama City, Fla A 
continuation of their research is being 
considered . 

"Navy designers are interested in 
studying the basic design of underwater 
craft with an eye to increasing stability, 
control and quietness," Roskam said. "They 
are interested in seeing if we can apply the 
latest principles of air flight design to their 
underwater craft." 

For the Navy project, Roskam and his 
associates needed a scale model of a sub- 
marine, with accuracy of the dimensions 
crucial to the outcome of the study. When 
KU researchers asked Navy officials for 
typical submarine measurements, however, 
they were told the information was 
classified. 



So they turned to Steve Enckson, a 
Lawrence junior in aerospace engineering 
and expert model builder, to construct a 
sub. 

The KU research is based on the theory 
that maneuverability, stability and noise 
levels of submarines depend on the flow 
patterns of water around the craft, much 
like air flow affects aircraft. 



Full Gospel 

Business Men's 

Fellowship International 

Dinner Meeting Dec. 8 

Union Ballroom 6:30 p.m. 
Speaker: 

Harald Bredesen 

Tickets for Sale: 
Until Dec. 5 

Cross-Reference 
Book Store & 
K-State Union ' 

i 
(No ticket sales at the door J 



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■ — fl Stall photo by Sue Pfannmuller 

Reflections 

The last light of the day reflects winter's bare branches in a window of 
Anderson Hall. 



Five-year-old crash survivor 
turned over to great aunt 



LAWRENCE (AP)— The lone survivor of 
a six-fatality crash on the Kansas Turnpike 
earlier this month has been turned over to 
the custody of his great aunt and uncle in 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Ulysses Betts, 5, was the subject of a 
lengthy temporary custody hearing in 
Douglas County juvenile court Wednesday 
before Associate District Judge Mike Elwell 
ruled I he boy should stay with Dr. and Mrs. 
Frederick Smith. He is the dean of biology at 
Tennessee State University and she is a 
guidance counselor and teacher in the Nash- 
ville school system. 

Judge Elwell entered the case when 
Lawrence Memorial Hospital officials didn't 
know which of several relatives the boy 
should be released to after treatment for 
burns and shock resulting from the Nov. 5 
crash. 

Three great aunts asked for custody of the 
boy. A petition was also filed by a man 



claiming to be the boy s natural lather. His 
name was not available. Court officials said 
that is a separate matter that will be taken 
up at a future permanent custody hearing. 

The boy had previously been referred to 
as Ulysses Brinston, but Elwell ruled the 
boy's stepfather, David Brinston of 
Clarksdale, Miss., had never legally 
adopted the boy while married to his 
mother. 

Brinston did not file a custody claim 
during Wednesday 's action. 




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NCE His Story 




vern's donuts 





-vSKsSSE 



10:00 p.m.- 
10:00 a.m. 

408 SO. 6th 

77**70*7 




There 4 ! 



There's 




L P. Album Hardcover Book 

Make Your Selection At: 

Cross Reference 



Hot & Glazed Donuts 
Come out at 10:00 



♦ 



When you get hungry for good, hot, homemade 

donuts, you don't have to go home to Mother, 

Come Home to Vern's! 



The Store with the Cross on the Door 

t» Poynti. Manhattan. 913-776-8071 

Open Mea.4kU.ff ;3»<5:3fc Thurs. 9::t0-X:30 



■■ 



IBB 






14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, FN., December 1, 1978 



Licensing of lay midwives 
debated by committee 



TOPEKA, (AP)-It would be premature 
to make any recommendation on the 
licensing of lay midwives, a special com- 
mittee of the Kansas Legislature agreed 
Thursday. 

But the interim Public Health and Welfare 
Committee battled for at least a half-hour 
over the wording that would state its 
position. 

A preliminary draft of the committee's 
report included the words: "The committee 
does not recommend the licensing of lay 
midwives at this time." 

Sen. John Vermillion <K- Independence) 
and Rep. Sharon Hess (R- Wichita) con- 
tended this language was too strong, too 
negative. 

Reps. Mike Johnson of Abilene and Arnold 
Anderson of WaKeeney, both Democrats, 
argued the original language of the report 
should be left unchanged since the com- 
mittee is not recommending the licensing of 
lay midwives. However, a motion by 
Johnson to keep the original wording was 
defeated 6-4, 

The revised statement, saying that a 
recommendation would be premature, was 
approved 6-2. 

The committee also decided against 
recommending any changes in existing laws 
that would authorize the practice of mid- 
wifery by unlicensed persons. 

One reason cited by the committee for its 
position is that the Statewide Health 
Coordinating Council has been asked to 
make a study of the licensing or other 



credentialing of health care providers. The 
committee said it believes no new health 
care providers should be licensed or 
otherwise credent ialed until the legislature 
has an opportunity to review the report that 
will be made by the Health Coordinating 
Council. 



Collegian 
Classifieds 



One day: 20 words or lots, $1.50, 5 cents 
par word ovsr 20; Two days: 20 words or loss, 
12.00, 6 conts per word over 20; Three days: 
20 words or loss, S2.25, 10 cents par word 
over 20; Four days: 20 words or less, $2.75, 13 
cents per word over 20; Five days: 20 words or 
less, $3.00, IS cents per word over 20. 

Classifieds are payable In advance unless client nil an 
Established account with Student Publications. 

Deadline is 10 am day before publication 10 a.m. Friday 
for Monday paper 

Items found ON CAMPOS can be advertised FREE for a 
period not exceeding three days. They can be placed at Ked 
zie 103 or by calling 5326555 

Display Classified Rente 

One day: $2 75 per Inch; Three days: 12.60 per inch: Five 
days: t2.50 per Inch; Tan days: 12.40 per Inch. (Deadline is 5 
p.m. 2 days before publication.) 

Classified advertising is available only to those who do not 
discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national 
origin, sex orinceatry. 

FOR SALE 

MANHATTAN USED Furniture, 317 S, 4fh. Come In and 

browse 7764112 (3-75) 

WE SELL Maranu and Phillips. Tech Electronic Warehouse, 
across from Vista Drive Inn on Tuttle Creek Blvd. (23tt) 



MOSSMAN GUITARS -due to factory shut down I have for a 
short time some very nice acoustic steel-siring guitars at 
less than hall original price. Cell after 5:00 p.m. 316-221 
2626 or 221-3968, Wlnlleld, KS. 15271) 

ONE BEDROOM trailer in North Campus Courts. Walk to 
class, small but comfortable, and less than rent at 11 IBS. 
776-3709 (62401 

1972 MOBILE home, 12x70. on large lot with patio and shed 
Cell 939-1639 after 500 p.m. or anytime weekends. (63-66) 

GOODYEAR F60x15 snow tires on Chrysler rims 175 Model 
561 Remington .22 rifle with 4x scope. 150. Call 776-4280 
(63-67) 

NEW PAIR of skit, MO. If interested call 539-9536. (64661 

MUST SELL: Nice 12 x 60, two bedroom mobile home, par- 
daily furnished, fully carpeted, washer/dryer. Possession 
1st of year 537-1566 or 1 455-3401. ask tor Kathy (64-681 

1960 EL Cammo pick up, full power, air conditioning, CB 
radio, air shocks, v-8, automatic, Mlchelln steel belted 
tires. Excellent condition, extra clean. Phone 776-6436 (64 
68> 

i960 FORD LTD, good condition, new battery, good tires, 
$350 Call Ramll Othman, 537-1614 after 5:00 p m Will be In 
Room 03E Agronomy Oepl. during school hours. (64-66) 

12 x 05 KIRK WOOD. 3 bedroom, two bath, new carpel and 
drapes, skirted, shed, fenced yard. After 6:00, 1-404-2735. 
(64681 

1966 MUSTANG, good condll Ion. one owner, blue, three 
speed. 6 cylinder, 537-2536 or 539-9023, ask for Rich Chinn. 
(6466) 



HELP! I I'M graduating and need lo sell my trailer home. 
Clean 10' » 55' comes completely furnished and ready to 
move Into Cheaper than living In dorm or apartment. Call 
776-5652 (6468) 

1973 FRONTIER 12 x 60 two bedroom mobile home. Washer 
dryer, skirted, partially furnished. 776-3056. (6466) 

1976 HOMETTE mobile home, 14x70, three bedrooms, com- 
pletely tu ml a had, central air, skirted, tie downs. Excellent 
condition. Call 537-4066 after 5:00 p.m. (6569) 

GUNS, NEW selection. Coll, Roger, SAW. R.G., Llama, Ex- 
can, Luger, Titan, Winchester, others. Excellent selection 
of caliber. Treasure Chest, Old Town. (6569) 

COINS MAKE excellent gilts Complete selection U.S. and 
Foreign. Birthyear and anniversary seta available Treasure 
Cheat, Old Town Mall— Agglevl lie. (65-76) 

CHESS SETS, hand carved, wooden and onyx. Also Chess 
tables and backgammon sets. Ideal Christmas gilts 
Treasure Cheat, Agglevl lie. (65-76) 

ANTIQUE JEWELRY and watches, nice selection of the 
classic oid style* lor Christmas. Otd Town Mall and 
Agglevllle (65-74) 



doWttStOWn by Tim Downs 




PEANUTS 



by Charles Shulfc 



50 ^OU PONT THINK 
I'M PERFECT, HUH? 




WELL,WREFAfc 
FROM PERFECT WURSELF 

CHAKUEBROUrN! 





Crossword By Eugene Sbeffer 



ACROSS 

1 Onager 
4 Verify 
8 Punish, 
physically 

12 French isle 

13 — majesty 

14 Devil's 
domain 

15 Exhausted 
17 Like pizza 
It Preserved 

19 Movie initials 

of yore 
21 Prefix with 

cycle 
7X One or the 

other 
26 Black hole, 

for one 

29 Concorde 

30 Age 

31 Bump into 

32 Legal matter 

33 Furnished 
temporarily 

34 Greek 
vowel 

35 Poetic word 

36 Confused 
fight 

37 Tatters 

39 Adoring one 



40 Heine's 
consort 

41 Star-related 
45 Inner: 

comb, form 
48 Place not 
to be 

50 Peruse 

51 Famed 
canal 

52 Comprehend 

53 Author 
Vidal 

54 Dispatch 

55 Dine 
DOWN 

1 Gives a 
hand 



Average solution time 

1 



2 Deer track 

3 Type of lily 

4 Non-citizens 

5 Opera 
composer 

6 Vane 
direction 

7Rectify 

8 Use a 
gun 

9 Hawaiian 
neckwear 

10 — for one 

11 Wield 
with 
energy 

10 Type of 
fund 

25min. 




®W HHtEELl 



3(53 (fl3Ll HS@ 




Answer to yesterday's puzzle, 



20 — and 

caboodle 
23 Cad 
24Seabird 
25 Evaluate 
28 Iowa town 

27 Alcott girl 

28 Calendar 
unit 

29 Oriental 
currency 

32 Dwells 

33 Musical 
direction 

35 Tokyo, once 

30 Potatoes, 
sometimes 

38 Wear away 

39 Dickens 
villain 

42 Ploy 

43 Like a ship 

44 Former 
manorial 
court 

45 Unit of 
work 

48 New: comb, 
form 

47 Patriotic 
org. 

49 Swedish 
coin 




CRYPTOQUIP 12-1 

HNN MAZMWSWCA NECAUM VWNN 

CHNTA SKAWU EVZ SUTSK 

Yesterday's Cryptoqulp - TOUGH TALES ELICIT RAUCOUS 
LAUGHTER. 

Today's Cryptoqulp clue: E equals O 



JUST PURCHASED 500 used science (iction paperbacks. 
Remarkable selection. Treasure Chest, 1124 Moro, 
Agglevllle. Also have westerns, rams nets, novels. detee-\ i 
lives. (6569) -> 

TWO ALTEC Lansing 1207 A 5' column speakers, each with 4 
10" speakers Can 532-571 1 (6567) 

1972 JAVELIN, power brakes, steering, excellent condition, 
sharp looking. Only 1999 Call lor Lou at 539-5033 (6569) 

SEARS 14,000 BTU air conditioner. Used two summers, ex- 
cellent condition. Only $100. Call 776-6763 after 5:00 p.m. 
(65-69) 

1966 CHEVROLET Biscay ne, 8 cylinders, air conditioner, 
everything in perfect condition. Best offer over 1350 Call 
7766783 after 5:00 p.m. (6569) 



Lucille's-Westloop 



20% OFF 



AND MORE ON 



EVERYTHING 



IN OUR STORE 
UNTIL DEC. 25 



STEREO SVSTEM In excellent condition. Realistic STA44B 
stereo receiver, two Realistic elctrostat 2a speakers. Sony 
TC 270 reel lo reel stereo tape recorder with speakers, all 
this lor only S4O0. Call 7764783 after 5:00 p.m. (6569) 

HIKING BOOTS, women's size 7 v> M. good condition. Worn 
very little. Ceil 539-6613. (6566) 

SNARK. MACH II sailboat 86 square foot sell. Phone 537- 

0627.(6668) ■ 

1974 CHEYENNE 3/4 ton air, power steering, power brakes. 
AM-FM stereo, cruise control 454. one owner. 537-0154 af- 
ter 7:00 p m. (6667) 

TYPEWRITER SMC 2200, three years old. 7766301. 16668] 



SUBLEASE 

SECOND SEMESTER Specious lumlshed apartment lor one 
person, available January 1. 801 Moro, apartment 2E; call 
539-1776, Dave. (62-66) 

THROUGH MAY, furnished two bedroom, dishwasher, air 
conditioned. Close to campus. Available now. 776-5189 
(6367) 



ROOMMATE WANTEP 

FEMALES TO share exceptional house al KSU, lumlshed, 
private bedrooms, 165 and up, washer and dryer, no pets, 
at 809 N. 1 1th. 5396401 (5766) 

FEMALE FOR spring seme ter. N on smoking Monthly rent 
160.30, 1/3 utilities. Across from Aheam. Interested person 
call 7760122. (6266) 

MALE WANTED to share two bedroom mobile home 
Serjfmonth plus one half untitles. Call 776-5617 after 6:00 
pm.(6348) 

MALE TO share two bedroom trailer house. HO month plus 
one half utilities. Call after 5:30 p.m., 776-7460. Ask tor 
Paul. (6366) 

FEMALE. PRIVATE bedroom, 175 a month futilities in- 
cluded). Call 776-3899 after 5 00 p.m (6366) 

TWO FOR great house two blocks from campus. Own 
bedroom, two baths, basement, garage, pets. S70/monlh 
plus 113 utilities Free cable and HBO. 7764204. (6468) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share luxury apartment $100 a mon- 
th, plus 1/3 utilities. Fireplace, dishwasher. Call 7760057 
alter 5:00p.m (6466)< 

PERSON TO share very large older home Own bedroom. 
Prefer ftlrly quiet responsible individual. 5374125 (6466) 

QUIET, NONSMOKING male to share one bedroom fur- 
nished apartment tor spring semester. $94Jmonth plus t/2 
utilities 539-5932. (6448) 

CHRISTIAN FEMALE desires same to share large, sunny 
apartment Two blocks from campus. Laundry facilities 
$75 month Cell Lynn. 539-7047. (65-71) 

FEMALE. SPRING semester Nice second tlc-or apartment. 
Near campus Own bedroom Ott street parking $75. Afler 
5:00 p.m. 539-7059 (6547) 

JANUARV FIRST. Female to share one bedroom apartment 
near campus and Aggie. Furnished $88 month, washer and 
dryer. Call 776-1813 (6547) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester Private bedroom, laundry. 
Four blocks from campus. $75 per month plus one fourth 
utilities Call 776-3644. (65491 

FEMALE NEEDED lor spring semester to share furnished 
three bedroom apartment Large private room $95 
Utilities paid. Call Catherine. 5394444 (6549) 

RESPONSIBLE MALE to share (wo bedroom mobile home. 
$60 month plus one half u I III lies Ask tor Don 532-5620, 
776-4920. (6646) 

MALE TO share large house one block from KSU. Private 
bedroom, furnished $70 «t 1108 Bluemont 5394401 (66 
95) 

FEMALE TO share two bedroom lumlshed apartment ctoae 
to campus. $100 month plus electricity 7764926. (6648) 

LIBERAL MALE or lemale roommate lor second semester 
Two bedroom apartment one block Irom campus $80 mon 
Ih 7767368 after 4:00 p.m. |66-70) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester, low bills, f 100 month, private 
bedroom. 7767368 after 4:00 p.m. (66 70) 

FEMALE WANTED to share luxunous large new Iwo 
bedroom trailer house, convenient location $60 plus one 
third utilities 776-78 tO (66 70) 

MALE TO share nice basement apartment two blocks from 
Aggievllle and lour blocks Irom campus Call Korby 776 
3064. (66-701 



(Continued on page 15) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Frl. t 0*c*mb«* 1 , 1 978 



18 



(Continued (rom page U) 



WANTED 



FOR BENT 

TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electrics and manuals: day. wMk 
or month. Buzzelis. Si 1 Leavenworth, across from post of 
Hce Call 776-9469. <1tl> 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS: Excellent selection. Hull Business 
Machines, 1212 Moro, 5397931 Service moat makes of 
typewriters Also Victor and Olivetti adders (I8tl( 

SANTA SUITS Reserve yours now Treasure Chest, 
Agglevllle- (43-70) 

LARGE TWO bedroom apartment with two sleeping loft a, 
$270, bills paid, at 1 01 6 Osage 537 4233 (57-71) 

ONE AND three bedroom apartment, three blocks to cam- 
put, fully carpeted, laundry facilities. J 125 and 1250 plus 
utilities SISDenlson, 7784960. (81-87! 

LARGE REDECORATED, tumlshed one bedroom duplex 
Country sett In g, close In. It 86. No pets 7784848 (8347) 

ONE BEDROOM furnished basement apartment. Pate 
welcome. Between Aggie and downtown. Available Jan. 1. 
Call 539-7128. (8347) 

LARGE ONE bedroom furnished apartment at 221 N. Juliette 
Water, trash, and heat paid, $180 per month 778-3888 or 1- 
458-9814 (64-76) 

ONE OR two bedroom I um I shed apartment one block from 
campus, all utilities paid, available now. 7764010, 7:00 a.m. 
lo 5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday (6447) 

AVAILABLE JAN i —One bedroom furnished apartment, car- 
peted, tlSSfmonth. Calf 778-0274 after 6:00p.m. (6448) 

HUGE ROOM to rani, IBS/month, all utilities paid, kitchen, 
laundry fac lilt lea. five minute walk to campus. Call 532 
6850 (9-5). Leave message for Rich Et ten son. will return 
cell (6448} 

COZY ONE bedroom basemen I apartmenl. One block from 
campus Available January let. t!30 a month. Call 776- 
3007 after 5:00 p.m. (8448! 

SPRING SEMESTER, lerge. werm, one bedroom apartment 
for one, Iwo or Ihree persons Two blocks from campus. 
Laundry facilities (u II II lies appro* . 86/month). 1155. 539 
7047 (65-71) 

UNFURNISHEO HOUSE In Foatorla, S120. Call evenings and 
weekends. 1-457-3494 (6547) 

DUPLEX, FURNISHED, Mont Blue apartments. One block 
from campus. All conveniences, available tor second 
semester 5374058. (6549) 

UNIVERSITY PARK, furnished house. Three bedrooms. 
Modem. Call 539-4182. (8849) 



WILDCAT INN 

2nd Semester 

Seniors Graduating 

Make Limited Availability 

For 2nd Semester 

Occupancy 

Call 

CELESTE 
for Information 

539-5001 



STILL AVAILABLE, flral parson backed oul. Trailer, close to 
campus, must be sludent. Please try again. 778-5892. (85- 
87) 

SMALL, ONE bedroom apartment, shower, near campus. 
It 15 and electricity 637 8141 after 5:00 p.m. (6549) 

A SLEEPING room. 537-9781. (68) 

PLUSH. TWO bedroom furnished apartment, carpeted, cen- 
tral air laundry dishwasher balcony, near campus, 
Agolevllle, January »28O.776-06O0alter 5:00p.m. (66-70) 

NOW AVAILABLE newly carpeled two bedroom house. Call 
532 3121 or 537-1289 Ask tor Terry (88-701 



NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 

from $165 

• FREri shuttle service to 

KSU 

• portion of utilities paid 

• adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

PHONE 

539-2951 

or see at 
1413 Cambridge Place 



TWO BEDROOM basement apartment, furnished 
Washer/dryer hook up 1160 plus KPL,at 1822 Hunting, one 
halt block from KSU. 5394401 (8840) 

LARGE FURNISHED apartmenl at 1018 Osage, bedrooms 
and sleeping lofti, good lor 3-4 people. J250. bill* paid. 
537-4233. (68-95) 

FURNISHED BEDROOMS, kllchen and laundry facilities, 
tree parking and walk to KSU. J55 and up, bills paid. 537 
4233, (6495) 



LOST 



LARGE HOUSE to rent January second to tenth Call 539- 
1264 evenings. (6347) 

MALE TWENTY plus lo share recently remodeled home on 
Vainer St. Must en|oy living In clean house and be willing 
to do his part lo keep It clean. 5394208 (6549) 



FREE 



I HAVE two dogs thai I would Ilka to give to good homes 
One Is s smalt house broken, mixed. The olher Is larger, 
part German short hair, and Brittany. Call 539-4 113. (8248) 



FOUND 



CAMERA AT International Student Center. Claim and Iden- 
tity, Foreign Student Oft lea, (8448) 

EIGHT KEYS including two unlverelty keye, nol on a key ring. 
Call 5324333 (8446) 

GOLD STICK pto. Initial C— Between Union and 
Seston- identify at 7749785 or claim at 1324 N. Manhat- 
tan Ave. (8448) 

STUDENT RESERVED basketball ticket. Call lo Claim, 774 
8685 (6547) 

SET OF keys on leather key chain. Call 539-2373 and ask for 

Robbl (6848) 

HELP WANTED 

EXTRA HOURS earn you 1500 per 1000 stuffing envelopes 
with our circulars. For Information S&S Enterprise. Dept. 
11, P.O 1 158. Mlddletown, OH 45042 (53-77) 

OVERSEAS JOBS— Summerrluli time. Europe. S. America, 
Australia, Asia, etc. All fields. t50O1200 monthly, ex- 
penses paid, sightseeing Free Info. Write: international 
Job Center, Box 4490-KB, Berkeley, CA 94704(60-79) 

ONEHOUSE BOY needed tot I unch h our , 1 2 00- 1 : 30 p m Csl I 
539-2373. (4446) 

PROGRAMMER/ANALYST, a Manhattan based Research 
Firm offers good salary and benefits to qualified applicant 
with FORTRAN andfor PUI knowledge and BS or 
equivalent experience. A background In Statist lea Is 
desirable, as well as experience with CMS and/or OSJCL 
Apply Kansas Job Service, 621 Humboldt, 7764884 by Nov. 
29th. (8546) 

AGGIE STATION la now taking applications for waitresses 
waiters Apply In person, 1 1 15 Moro slier 4:00 p.m. (85-70) 



Associate Director 
Hospital Design Specialist 

Program and plan complex 
hospital buildings and co-ordinate 
space assignments for Research 
Patient care and educational func- 
tions within a large university 
medical center. Challenging long- 
term position for graduate ar- 
chitect with strong hospital plan- 
ning background. Considerable ex- 
perience in remodeling and space 
renovation desirable. Excellent 
salary and benefits. Full position 
description available. 

Resume and references must be 
received by Dec. 7, 1978 by the Em- 
ployment Office, 39th and Rainbow 
Blvd., Kansas City, KS 66103. An 
equal opportunity employer. 



POSITION AVAILABLE. Female Director for Manhattan Teen- 
Outreach Drop-In Center. 1250 month. Hours: 6:30 p.m.- 
10:30 p.m Wednesday -Saturday. Send relume to Tony 
Jurich, Dept. FCD, Justin Hall, 532-55 10 Closing dale Mon- 
day. Dec. 4th (8548) 

JANITOR— FULL lime, mostly daya. Apply In parson, office 
525. Ramsda Inn (8549) 

BURGER KING wants individual to work two nights during 
the week, 7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. One weekend night 
required 7:00 p.m. to 3 00 a.m. Start S245 per hour S3 after 
one monlh. Contact Mr. Wagner or Mf Nelson in person. 
(6476) 



SERVICES 



AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD puppy with while collar Call 539 
8883 (6448) 

MAN'S WEDDING ring Thenk*Qlvln d«y|1l Imperial gas 
station on PoynU Reward Please cell 5394463 (64«ei 

/* . BLUE BACKPACK in Derby Food Center Including three 
books important notebooks and calculator. Reward 90Z 
Haymaker Hall 532-3670 (68-70) 



RESUMES WRITTEN from scratch. 118 and up. Also general 
typing, writing, editing. Fast Action Resumes. 415 N. 3rd, 
537-7294 (8478) 

STEREO REPAIR, over 500 replacement styles in stock. The 
Circuit Shop, 7741221, 1204 Moro St. (8-78) 

THE OFFSET Press prints anything: resumes, brochures, let- 
terheads posters, pamphlets, newspapers. Let us do your 
next |Ob 317 Houston 776-4889. (2 2 It) 

ENGAGEMENT RINGS, wedding sets Custom designing In 
gold and silver Jewelry repair including antique lewelry. 
Custom Jewelers, 539-3225. 41 1 N Third. (55-74) 

CHRISTMAS PORTRAITS Paslel. charcoal and pencil 
likeness Guaranteed Prices from $5 lo 115. Live or from 
photo Call 776-1884 (80-76) 

VW BUGS! Tune Up's only 119 at J&L Bug Service, includes 
plugs, points, timing and carburetor adjustment Valve ad- 
justment 18 extra. Price applies to 1982-74 type t without 
air conditioning. 1-494-2388, St George (8248) 



SOUPENE 
COMPUTER 

WHEEL 
ALIGNMENT 

114South5th Phone776-8054 



IS YOUR Volkswagen herd to shift in cold weelher? We can 
install a transmission oil thai makes your shifter easy to 
shift and protects your transmission better Call J&L Bug 
Service for Information 1 -494-2388 (66-70) 



WILL DO typing (term papers, resumes, etc.) any type of 
malarial Am experienced. Call 7740086 (6549) 



ATTENTION 

FREE MOTHER Of Pearl or turquoise earrings with every 845 
purchase while supply lasts. Buy at our sale prices 1)3 off 
all Inventory except gold and scrimshaw and receive your 
free pair Men's chokers 110. Men's beautiful gold and 
silver hand -made turquoise rings 148. Wooden Inlayed belt 
buckles 19. Ladles' mother of pearl necklace 110. Rings te 
Bracelets te. Opal pendants only 121. We also have scenic 
picture Jasper, tiger eye, lire agates and malachite, all tf3 
off. Ladles Starting silver chokers 1/2 olf only 13 Slick pins 
18. Over 300 pair assorted earrings 12 each. Wlndflre 
Jewelry, 230 N 3rd. Open 10:00 a.m. -5: 30 p.m. Do your 
Chrisfmaaeartyl (62 76) 

ATTENTION LADIES: KSU football recruiting has started and 
we need you tor Kitten Krultera Involves Saturday af- 
ternoons hosting recruits for lunch and tour ot Manhattan. 
If Interested, call 532-5878 (85-71) 

THE FOLLOWING people have not picked up their 1978 

Royal Purples. Please come to Kedzle 103 and do so. Lan- 
ce David Colle, Cynthia A. Collins, Roberto Colons. James 
Col v In, Lawrence Combs. Clyde Conns ly. Srenl Alfred 
Cook, Lisa Anne Coon, Sheryl L. Copenhaver (6648) 



NOTICES 

MANHATTAN PAWN Shop, 317 S. 4th Street, 774- 
6112— etereoe. 8-tracks, TV's, typewriters, guitars, 
cameras. Buys ell trade, (3-75) 

THE FOLLOWING people have not picked up their 1978 
Royal Purples. Please come to Kedzle 103 and do so. Lan- 
ce David Colle, Cynthia A. Collins, Roberto Colon, Jamas 
Colvln, Lawrence Combs, Clyde Connely, Brent Alfred 
Cook, Lisa Anne Coon, Sheryl L. Copenhaver. (8648) 



SAINT PAUL'S 
DISCUSSION SERIES 

Theme: Chapters in church 
history 

Time: 9:30 A.M. Sundays 

Place: Common room 

Saint Paul's— 6th & Poyntz 

Leader James D'Wolf, Rector 



010 YOU ever wonder how our Christmas traditions got star- 
ted? (86) 



PERSONAL _ 

ANDREAAAAAAt HAPPY 20th beerthday tomorrow I Lets go 
Jiff In', grab some wine and give each other permsnents 
Like II Kinky P 2. (66) 

INFANTILE-SUZIE oozie oozie, you can't do It no more. Go 
for II on your 19th birthday. Fifth floor friends. (86) 

BARETTA 4ILLINGS, sexy twig and leader of the Ihlrd floor 
Ford diet crew, Happy 19th birthday, kiss Michael tor us 
(86) 

D. LEWIS, Please stay! Maybe you'll run out ot excuse! for 
refusing dates with me (somehow I doubt it) Guess who. 
P.S. You r tvr 1st s are excel! ed on I y by you r bu ns . (88) 

HAPPV BIRTHDAY Tee Heel The party's on you al your 
house after the bars close Sat. I Friends Invited BYO 
everything. Love. USM66) 

ARLENE, REMEMBER Jell'o, Putt-Putt, Roy. w.n.o., acllve 
pledges Aggie Loo's, our brothers. Ice cream, T J Swann. 
Jim Shorts. Crystal bait, Haymaker 9-1. code 9 loose but 
not too loose, Dassle jogging and Irttz. I'll miss yea, 2, J. 
(88) 

BOOSTER: TUESDAY was fun— Lei's do It again some II ma I 
Who says we haft a come down— cloud nine le a great 
place to five. A-carolllnQ we will got Love, Tuna Supreme 
(66) 

YOU ARE one of the beat Girl Fridays 'round ole Kedzle. Hap- 
py BO on Saturday I (84) 

TO THE "Rlv" Kid: You're so sweet I Hope you are feeling 
much belter today. Are you ready to party hardy? Love, The 
"Corvette' ' Lady (PS. this la good for one pre birthday 
kiss.) (66) 

TO "MAN ol the Wortd": I love youf From Miss Universe. f68) 

HEY MIKE Y, "You've got the culesl little baby face I" Have a 
happy happy birthday! Yours truly. PS "How deep Is your 
love?" (Remember Mother's and our third anniversary?) 
(68) 

YGAR: THE Island ot Thryth looks forward to your 
"retirement" year*— the first was Ihyrrltle Thane Thryn In- 
vites you lo establish residency (68) 

ATTENTION ALL PI Kappas, Smurthies, Great Benders and 
such related persons. The Woman's having another one 
Announcing the second annual Stelner B-Day party Satur 
day night at K's. Be theret Aloha! PS. Happy 20th Jen. The 
Gang. (66) 

BRI THERE Is a guy who caught my eye. You can bet it was 
In the Catskellar we met. Just about a year ago I'd like you 
to know I'm so happy I met this guy who caught my eye 
Ol. (88) 

UNTIL I mel you I dldn'l know "desk work" could be so much 
fun. I'll even go to class with you. As long as It's held In 
1 3 1 Oh . I el mo st forgot Happy B da y Love (68) 

A.G. — I am curious. George Please call , Woody. (66) 

A PI pledges: The jocks are psyched, the setting is right: 
ihe A D PI pledges are out* site 1 The U pledges (66) 

JEFF -IT must be that Welah royally thai makes you look so 
good on a white horse. Happy birthday (66) 

PAMMV SUE— Even though you'll probably get Fubar, Sat. 
niahl It'll be Snalu! Happy 201h, and be sure and save 
some room alter we've drowned those KKY lightweights 
Frl. night! Your I si low drunk (and daughter) Farmer. (66) 

MK 222 Happy year and a half tomorrow. Looking forward lo 
seeing you Love. S. (64) 



WELCOME 



MASSES AT Catholic Student Center, 711 Denison, 9:00 a.m., 
10:00 a.m., 11:t5 a.m., 12:15 and 5:00 p.m. Sundays. Week- 
days 4:30 p.m. Saturdays 5:00 p m. (66) 

CHURCH OF Ihe Nazarene. 1000 Fremont. Sunday School. 
10:00 a.m .; Evening Service. 8:30 p.m.; Prayer Service. 
Wednesday. 7 00pm (66) 

MISS THE small church atmosphere? Come worship with us. 
Keats United Methodist Church, 8 miles west of KSU on 
Anderson Church, 9 00 am; Sunday School. 1000 a.m. 
(86) 



PEACE LUTHERAN Church Invites you to our 8:18 a.m. and 
10:30 a.m. Sunday aervtces. Go 1/2 mile west of atadlum on 
Kimball We an friendly (88) 

WORSHIP ON campus at All-Faiths Chapel, 10:48 em. 
Evening service 6 30 p.m. 1225 Bert rand, the University 
Christian Church, Douglas D. Smith, m In later. Wars un- 
denominational I (88) 

FIRST LUTHERAN Church, 10th and Poyntz. Unlverelty 
students ere invited to attend a Bible Study Group that 
meets In the basemen! ol the main building of the Church 
el 9:40 a.m. on Sundays. Worship service at 8:30 a.m. and 
11:00 »-m Pastors, Milton J. Olson 539-1679, Thomas F. 
Schaeffer 7741985. (66) 

COLLEGE HEIGHTS Baptist Church, 2221 College Heights 
Road. Worship 9:45 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Bible Study 11:00 
a.m. Phone 539-3598 Bill Foil, Pastor. (68) 

GRACE BAPTIST Church. 2901 Dickens, welcomes you 10 
Worship Services al 8:30 and 1 1 00 a.m. University Class 
meets al 9:45 a.m. Evening service 6:00 p.m. Horace 
Bralsford. Ken Edlger 7740424 (68) 

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

Juliette and Vattier 537-7633 

Sunday School 9:45 a.m. 

Morning Worship 11:00a.m. 

Evening Service 7:00p.m. 

College Class meets in Reynards' Restaurant In 
Wal-Mart Shopping Center at 9 :20 a . m. All studen- 
ts welcome! 
Ministers: 
GeneT. Neeley— Pastor 

Phone: 537-7967 

Larry K. Hartman— Asst. Pastor 

Phone: 77tHK»36 

MANHATTAN WESLEVAN Church, PoynU and Manhattan 
Ave. Worship, 8:30 and 10:55 a.m.; Sunday School. 9:45 
a.m. A vital biblical fellowship (88) 



You are invited to join us 
at the 

FIRST UNITED 

METHODIST CHURCH 

Sixth and Poyntz 

9:45 a.m. "The Open Door" 

Dialogue and Study 

Educational Center 

Rm. 2526 

11 a.m. Divine Worship 

Rides Available 
Call 776-8821 



WELCOME STUDENTS! First Christian Church, 115 N 5th. 
Cottage class. 9:45 am; Worship, 11:00 a.m. Ministers; 
Ben Duerteldt, 5398685, 8111 McCulchen, 776-9747. For 
transportation call 776-8 790 afler 9:00 am. Sundays (68) 



COME JOIN US 
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

2121 Blue Hills Rd. 
539-8691 

Church service hour 

9:45a.m. 

Worship service hour 

11:00a.m. 

Forfree Rides 

Call Bell Taxi 

537-2080 or 537-7979 



MENNONITE FELLOWSHIP. Sunday School at 9:30 a.m. 
Worship at 1030 am Located at 1021 Den Is on al Ihe ECM 
building (old UMHE building). Mike Klasaen. 539-4079 (86) 



Welcome to 

The Celebration of 

Worship on Sunday 

At9:00 a.m. & 11 :00a.m. 

at 
FIRST 

PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 

8th & Leavenworth 
(537-0518) 



The Blue Bus will 

call by Goodnow at 

10:35 a.m., Boyd A West 

at 10:40 a.m. for the 

11:00a.m. service. It will 

return to campus following 

the service. 



ST PAUL'S Episcopal Church wel cornea you. Sunday ser- 
vices 8:00 a.m.-11:Q0 a.m. Dally services, S30 p.m Holy 
Communion, Tuesday 1000 a.m.. Thursday 530 p.m Bible 
reading discussion class Sundays 9:30 a.m.. 81 h and Poyn- 
tl 778-9427 (88) 

WELCOME TO Ihe Church of Christ. 2510 Dickens, Sunday 
9:30 a.m., Bible classes, 10:30 a.m.. Worship and Com 
munlon, 6:00 p.m . evening Worship. Harold Mitchell, 
minister 53SMJ581 or 539-9212. (8S| 



16 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri.. D»ctmb«r 1. 1978 



'Is it this easy to die?' 



Survivor recalls 50-foot plunge from bridge 



SEATTLE (AP)— Duncan McKenzie, the 
lone survivor of five persons who jumped off 
an ice-slicked bridge to escape a skidding 
tractor trailer, said his first thought was, 
"Is it this easy to die?" 

Then he was awake, on the ground and 
hollering for help. His pregnant wife was 

Jerry Ray denies 
King murder role 

WASHINGTON (AP)-Jerry Ray, the 
brother of James Earl Ray, denied Thur- 
sday that he is the mysterious "Raoul," 
named as an alleged accomplice in the 
assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. 

The House assassinations committee had 
said it appears likely that Raoul was either 
Jerry Ray or John Ray, another brother of 
James Earl Ray, who is serving a 99-year 
prison term for the famed civil rights 
leader's slaying. 

Nearing the conclusion of its two-year 
investigation, the committee confronted 
Jerry Ray with indications that he met and 
talked several times with brother James in 
the months immediately preceding the April 
4, 1968, assassination in Memphis, Tenn. 

James Earl Ray pleaded guilty to the 
murder but then recanted his confession, 
saying he was drawn into the assassination 
plan by a man he identified only as Raoul 
He has described a series of contacts with 
Raoul in the months leading to the 
assassination. During this period, James 
Earl detailed his travels from Los Angeles, 
to New Orleans, to Montreal and to Mexico. 

JAMES EARL also told various persons 
along the way of various contacts with his 
brother, although he didn't specify whether 
the contacts were with Jerry or John. The 
committee has compared the Raoul 
meetings with contacts Ray had with one of 
his brothers. And the panel said there are 
some striking similarities. 

"When you come down to it, the Raoul 
theory that seems to fit is that the 
mysterious accomplice might actually be 
one of Ray's brothers, Jerry or John, or a 
composite of the two of them," said G. 
Robert Bla key, chief committee counsel. 

IN HIS testimony under oath, however, 
Jerry Ray said he believes James may have 
described contacts with his brother as a 
means of avoiding any reference to Raoul. 

"Raoul is still out there," he testified. 

Jerry Ray appeared under a grant of 
immunity which prevents prosecution for 
his testimony. 

He had previously denied to the FRI that 
he saw James after his brother's escape 
from the Missouri State Prison on April 22, 
1967. 

But on Thursday, Jerry acknowledged 
seeing his brother, who had escaped from 
prison, three or four times during the period 
leading to the assassination. 

But when asked about allegations that he 
was in frequent contact with James Earl, 
including a conversation the day before the 
assassination, he declared, "I could not 
have been in all those places even if 1 was 
theBionicman." 




V^ Daytime 
Anytime 




SWAN SON'S 

BAKERY 

225 POVNU 

fanUm *»«hittii 
T7SMS49 



dead, and soon afterwards, three others 
would die from the 50-foot fall. 

Moments earlier, they had been trying to 
sort out a four-car pileup on a fog-bound 
bridge over the Cowlitz River. 

By the time they noticed the truck, its 
headlights suddenly burning through the 
fog, they had nowhere to flee. 

Had they leaped from the other side of the 
bridge, they would have probably landed 
safely on a four-foot walkway. But in the 
foggy darkness, they couldn't see that 
beyond the side to which they scattered was 
a five-story drop onto rocks and the cold 
Cowl i tz currents. 

"I sort of eased myself over but just kept 
going." McKenzie said. "After about four 
seconds I knew it was going to be a long way 
down," 

MCKENZIE. 33, of Breckenridge, Mich., 
has been recuperating at a Portland, Ore. 
hospital. He recalled the tragedy in an in- 
terview with the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. 

He and his wife, Christine, had been 
visiting relatives. It was three nights before 
Thanksgiving. They were driving to Seattle 



to visit a friend. The road was wet in spots, 
the night was cold. 

"We were talking about going out for a 
nice dinner," he said. "Suddenly, as we 
came over the rise and down the grade, we 
saw cars piled up on the bridge. 

"I slowed down. I was only going about 20, 
but it was icy, and I pulled to the left to try 
and weave by the mess. I nicked one car but 
hit the other. 

"We nearly made it through." 

THE MCKENZ1ES got out of their car. No 
one was hurt and one man left for help. 
McKenzie told his wife to hurry away from 
the pile-up. 

"I remember telling her that it was 
dangerous and to get off the highway," 
McKenzie said. "I didn't see her after that. 

"I was talking to another man, trying to 
figure out how to move the cars before any 
more rammed us. 

"Then I saw a semi-truck loaded with 
steel bearing down the road toward us, and 
all I can remember is jumping over the 
bridge railing. I didn't see anyone else 
jump." 



McKenzie's ribs were broken in the fall. 
His left lung was collapsed and filled with 
blood. His hip was cracked and blood ran 
from a cut on his head . 

"1 heard three other people yelling 'Help! ' 
I did, too, but 1 thought it was hopeless," he 
said. "But someone answered." 

An hour later, an ambulance attendant 
told McKenzie his wife of only a few months 
was dead. 

"I'm numb right now," McKenzie said. 
"I'm isolated from the mental trauma. They 
buried Chris last week. It won't all come 
down on me until I'm back home." 





The book 
no college student 

should be without. 

It may not contain any great reading material, but it does 
contain some truly wonderful eating material. 

That's because our indispensable book is a book of 
McDonald's® Gift Certificates. It costs only five dollars (it's an 
inexpensive soft cover edition). And each of the ten 
certificates inside is worth fifty cents toward the purchase of 
delicious McDonald's hamburgers, our golden fries and all our 
other good food. 

So, when your scholar is starved for more than knowledge, 
make sure he has a book of our Gift Certificates around. 

It'll give him food for thought. 

We do It all for you 

■McDonalds 
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3rd & Vcrrtier, 
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KANSAS 

10PEKA, KS 



1:1 



CI"TY 
EXCI! 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December 4, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 85, No. 67 



Injury toll to 250 



Twister rampage kills 4 



BOSSIER CITY, La. (AP)-A tornado 
ravaged this northwest Lousiana city 
Sunday and other twisters touched down in 
Arkansas and Mississippi, killing at least 
four persons and injuring more than 250. 
About 140 National Guardsmen were called 
in to patrol. 

Among the dead were two young sisters, 
killed here by a car thrown through the wall 
of their home as they slept. 

The twisters spun out from a band of 
violent thunderstorms that spread over the 
Southeast. The damage in Bossier City alone 
was estimated at $100 million. 

"It's unbelievable the kind of damage we 
have out here," said Marvin Anding, mayor 
of the city of 60,000 people near Shreveport. 
"It's just total devastation." 

The dead girls were identified as 13-year- 
old Lisa Currington and her 8-year-old 
sister, J ana. A brown compact car lay on its 
back in what had been their bedroom. 

"They were in their room and this car 
came flying at the house," said a man 
identified as the girls' uncle. "It came down 
on their room and crushed them in their 
bed." 

Mike Liies, an Arkansas resident who was 
in Bossier City, said he was watching 
television at about 2a.m. when he heard the 
tornado. 

"1 WENT to the door and I saw it wrap the 
gas station around a pole," he said. The 
small self-service station across the street 
was a pile of rubble. 

One person died when a house trailer was 
demolished in nearby Heflin . 

In El Dorado, Ark., about 75 miles from 
here, Lurlene Helms, 53, was killed when a 
large tree fell and crushed her mobile home. 
The twister and storms injured six others in 
the area. 

Near Clarksdale in northwest Mississippi, 
one person was injured and homes, aircraft, 



trailers and farm buildings were destroyed. 

The tornado sliced through the heart of the 
Bossier City's business district early Sun- 
day, demolishing three motels, one apar- 
tment complex, a trailer park, dozens of 
businesses, a school and numerous homes in 
a 10- block area. 

"It's a miracle numerous other people 
weren't killed," said Betty Miller, city 
council member who lived in the Swan Lake 
subdivision where damage was heavy. 

She said the Meadowview Elementary 
School exploded when the twister hit. Parts 
of the school were found 10 blocks away, she 
said. 

AUTHORITIES reported some looting at 
the big Bossier Center, a sprawling shop- 
ping complex where a bank, restaurant, ice 
cream parlor, appliance store and other 
buildings were damaged. 

"It's unfortunate but by the time the 



tornado had gone three blocks past us, there 
were already looters inside," Anding said. 
He appealed for help from the Louisiana 
National Guard and from nearby Barksdale 
Air Force Base. 

When District Judge Charles Undsey, 
commander of the area National Guard 
unit, arrived to take command, he found his 
three-week-old armory in shambles. It also 
had been hit by the twister. 

Broken gas mains and sewer lines added 
to the problems. Huge steel utility poles 
were broken in half. Live electrical lines 
were scattered about. 

Mobile homes sat in the streets, and 
rubble lay scattered in vacant lots where 
buildings oncestood. 

"It's unlike anything I have ever seen," 
Ken Booth, Shreveport newsman, said. 
"I've seen the aftermath of hurricanes 
Hilda and Betsy, and this is the most 
devastated scene." 



nside 



GOOD MORNING, a whole lot of 
people went out in Saturday's freezing 
rain for a Fun- Run. Story and pictures 
page 10... 

COACH JACK Hartman picked up his 
300th major college victory Saturday 
night. Details, page 11... 

THE FIRST major freeze of Hie 
winter should melt today with high 
temperatures near 40 and maybe a little 
sunshine. Details, page 3... 




First Venus probe to hit today 



LOS ANGELES lAP)— The first American spacecraft intended 
to orbit Venus will arrive at the cloud-shrouded planet Monday, 
leading a flock of U.S. and Russian probes that will attempt to 
investigate Earth's nearest neighbor. 

Trailing the Pioneer Venus I orbiter are five more American 
probes that are the first U.S. craft aimed at the planet's surface. 
The probes were self-contained pieces of a single craft that split 
apart as it neared the planet. They are to reach Venus on Saturday. 

One will incinerate after briefly studying the harsh atmosphere. 
The others will plummet to the surface and be destroyed by the 
planet's crushing pressures and intense heat. 

Two Soviet craft racing toward the planet are due about two 
weeks after the American fleet. Both are expected to send probes to 
the surface. 

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration describes its 
$225 million project as an ambitious study of the planet's at- 
mosphere and climate. Scientists hope to get new clues to the forces 
that drive the weather on Earth. 



Directed by NASA's Ames Research Center at Mountain View, 
Calif., the mission is to mark the first time American instruments 
have been sent to the surface of Venus and the first time an 
American ship has been put into orbit about the planet. 

The surface-bound probes will crash into the planet about an hour 
after entering its atmosphere at widely scattered locations to 
measure and report on atmospheric conditions. The probes are not 
likely to survive the impact, NASA said. 

The orbiter is to circle the planet for at least one Venusiao year, 
about 225 Earth days, using its instruments to examine and 
measure the atmosphere. It also will bounce radar through the 
clouds to map as much as 35 percent of the hidden surface and 
search for mountains and craters. 

Scientists hope the mission will help explain why Venus, Earth's 
closest planetary neighbor and almost its twin in size, is so dif- 
ferent from this planet. 




Ice bowl 

ABOVE... Steve Thomas (left), Fort Riley, runs 
past the outstretched hands of Rick Fry (71), 
junior in political science, and John Birch, junior 
in general business administration, in a pick-up 



Stoft pftoto by Craig Chandler 



game Sunday afternoon. RIGHT... Tom Hickey, 
sophomore in general business administration, 
tries to keep warm between plays. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mori., D*c«mb«r 4, 1978 



Campus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL has scheduled the final oral 
detenu ot the doctoral dissertation ot William Seeker for 
J 10 p.m. Tuesday in Ward 135 

AVME CHRISTMAS BANQUET It Friday; tickets are 
available in Seaton 108. 

FRUIT CAKES are now on sale in Sheltenberoer 161. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING t shirts are on sale In 
Seal on 1 06. 

PRE LAW ADVISING OFFICE will present "Op 
portunlties '" Law at southern Methodist University 
School of Law' 'Kpm T uesday in Union 105. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL has scheduled the final oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of William Atwell fori 
p m today in ShelJenberger Conference Room. 

TODAV 

ENGINEERING STUDENT SPOUSES will have 



Christmas tea et Mrs. Ted Hodges' residence, 
Poyrvtt, at J : 30 p.m. 



191? 



HOME ECONOMICS COUNCIL will meet In Justin's 
Hoffman Lounge at 4 30 p.m. 

CHIMES EXECUTIVES will meet at the Union in 
formation Desk at S30 p.m. 

CHI ALPHA will meet in Union 164 at 1 :30 p.m. 

BUSINESS COUNCIL will meet in Union 301 at 4:30 p.m 

HORTICULTURE CLUB will meet at Valentino's 
Restaurant af 6 p m. 

dairy SCIENCE CLUB will meet In Call 140 at 7 30 p m 

CAMPUS HIGH LIFE will meet in Union 111 at T 30 p.m. 

Intersession sign-up 
begins today 

Registration for intersession classes 
offered from Jan 2 through 16 begins today 
in the K -State Union. Registration ends 
Wednesday, Dec. 6. 



HLUE KEY will meet in Derby Conference Room at »:30 
p m 

MEChA will meet in Union 10S at 4:30 pm. 

MORTAR BOARD will meet in Union 113 at 8:30 p.m 

SPEECH UNLIMITEO will meet in East Sladlum 107 B at 
4 p m. 

LITTLE SISTERS OP ATHENA will meet at fhe Alpha 
Kappa Lambda House at 8:30 p.m. 

HE TA ALPHA PSI will meet in Union 107 af 7 :30 p.m. 

GRAIN SCIENCE CLUB will meet in Shellenberger 301 at 

4:30 p.m. 

avid will meet in Justin's lobby at 7 p m. 

ASSOCIATION OF PRE DESIGN STUDENTS will meet 
m Seaton Court 109 at 8 p.m. 

UPC will have a Christmas party in the Union Actlvitie* 
Center 9:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m 

LAMBDA CHI ALPHA CRESCENTS executives will meet 
at the Lambda Chi Alpha House at 7 p.m.; a regular 
meeting will be held at 7:30 

ALPHA PHI OMEGA pledges will meet In Union 106 a) 6 
p m., a regular meeting will follow at 7. 

A L PH A TAU ALPHA will meet in Union 169 at 7 p.m. 

A and O CLUB will meet in the Union Sunlflower Room 
af noon 

FAMILY ECONOMICS CLUB will meet at Mr Morse's 
house, 7 C9 Lookout Drive at 7 p.m. 

TUESDAY 

BLACK STUDENT UNION will meet in Union 166 at 8 
O m 

<: himes will meet at the Douglas Center at* :30 p.m. 

i'HI ALPHA THETA will meet in Eisenhower 111 at 7 p.m. 

'EP COORDINATING COUNCIL will not meet. 

CLOTHING AND RETAILING INTEREST GROUP will 
meet in Justin 249 at 4:30 p.m 

i IVING GROUP ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet in the 
union Little Theater at ? p.m 

AGM6CHCLUBwlllmeetinSeatonl36at?p.m, 



N 
U 
T 
S 

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S 

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S 

N 
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S 

N 
U 
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S 



NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS 

riCANS 

For Sale Dec. l&H 

At (JpP^ fesea^ri Qceyhor^s 
ft redly WorHn of bicker* Halt 

B/ HORTICULTURE CLUB 

/\\\ pre- croaked - Xn 
rnuffip'« 3 °^ 5<b. baas only 

NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS 



N 
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S 

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({?7l k state union 

VJZI upc issues & ide; 



deas 



BADLANDS 

STARRING 

MARTIN SHEEN 

AND 

SISSY SPACEK 

7 P.M. WED., 

Dec. 6 
K-State Union 
Little Theatre 

Admission *1 



and the College of Architecture and 
Design Dept. of PDP 

I0O2VSK 



mZ 



PENNEY'S 



WOOLWORTH'S 

Announces New Store Hours 
For Your Holiday Shopping 

Convenience 

Sunday 12:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Mon. thru Fri. 9:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

ALL THREE STORES NOW OPEN 
EVERY WEEKDAY 9:00 A.M. til 9:00 P.M. 

DOWNTOWN MANHATTAN 



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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 



K ANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon.,PocTnpf 4,1878 

Medical board to hear Bourne 



Knife-carrying Guyanans left behind 

NEW YORK— Ten survivors of the Jonestown suicide-murders 
flew here from Guyana Sunday night, but 18 men were left behind 
because three were carrying knives, the plane's pilot said. 

Pan American Flight Capt. Albert Brockob said he refused to let 
the men board after a dispute with the FBI over a lack of FBI 
escorts for the group. 

He said he had not seen the knives, but he had been told they were 
not pocketknives. He said he did not know which men were carrying 
the knives, which were discovered by Guyanan security. 

Guyanan officials were not available to verify that the knives had 
been found. 

Among the men who stayed behind were two of cult leader Jim 
Jones' adopted sons. Several of the men, including Jones' sons, are 
reputed to have been Jones' personal bodyguards or members of the 
Jonestown security force. 

Nine women and a 3-year-old child made the trip, and upon their 
arrival they were questioned at length by officials from the FBI and 
other government agencies. 

FBI officials said the survivors had refused to meet with repor- 
ters. 

'Egghead experts' to solve farm woes? 

COLLEGE STATION, Texas— A west Texas wheat farmer said 
Sunday the National Farm Summit is nothing more than reports 
from some "egghead experts" who know nothing about "the 
problems we real farmers face, like losing $100,000 a year." 

Jerome Friemel of Hereford, Texas, said the national meeting 
has denied representation to the working farmer and added, "How 
can they come up with any answers unless they talk to us?" 

The farm summit begins Monday at Texas A&M University with a 
goal of solving numerous problems facing U.S. agriculture. 

Prior to the meeting, several members of the American 
Agriculture Movement (AAM) met in a College Station motel with 
officials of Texas A&M in an effort to insure they would have a say 
in the three-day session. 

While the talks were going on, trucks carrying grain and driven 
by farmers were en route to the Port of Houston for a direct sale to 
foreign nations. 

Leaders of the AAM said this is the first time farmers have 
marketed their own products without the use of a middle man. 



ATLANTA (AP) -Former White House 
adviser Dr. Peter Bourne says he will attend 
a Dec. 12 hearing before the Georgia 
medical examining board in connection with 
a drug prescription he issued for a White 
House employee under a fictitious name. 

"1 have a letter from the board requesting 
that I appear before it. and I will." said 



Bourne in an interview Saturday. "I don't 
know if I will lose my license or not." 

Bourne also is licensed to practice 
medicine in Washington, where he still 
resides, Colorado and California. Medical 
authorities in those areas have said they 
plan no action against him. 




ROfTUK 





West Loop 
Shopping Center 

539-6001 



OH! t enies « ^l**" 9 IT i t ac lon Um^OO^ FOR CHRISTMAS*] 

CACtO— The nresiHent of the American Medical Association 1 ^^ E 



CHICAGO— The president of the American Medical Association 
<AMA) vowed Sunday his organization will go all the way to the 
Supreme Court if necessary to overturn a Federal Trade Co- 
mmission (FTC) ruling that the AMA has conspired to fix prices. 

Dr. Tom Nesbitt of Nashville, Term., stated the organization's 
position as the 336-member house of delegates, the AMA policy- 
making body, opened its four-day winter session. 

"We intend to fight because the AMA is a private, voluntary 
association, and not an involuntary extension of the FTC," he said. 

"We intend to fight because state and local medical societies are 
free and independent organizations over which the AMA has not, 
does not, and should not have authority," Nesbitt said. 

He referred to a ruling last week by an FTC judge which held that 
the AMA has caused medical bills to go up by prohibiting doctors 
from advertising. 

Judge Ernest Barnes said the AMA's policy against doctors' 
advertising for patients, adopted early this century to stamp out 
medical quackery, has evolved into a way of assuring big profits for 
physicians. 

* 

Drunken Synanon founder arraigned 

KINGMAN, Ariz.— Charles Dederich, who turned his Synanon 
alcohol and drug rehabilitation program into a religious cult, was 
arraigned in his hospital bed Sunday, too drunk to be taken to court, 
on charges connected with attempted murder, authorities said. 

Dederich, 65, was formally charged at Mohave County General 
Hospital with conspiracy and solicitation to commit murder in a 
bizarre rattlesnake attack on Paul Morantz, 33, a Los Angeles at- 
torney. He was held in the hospital's jail ward in lieu of $500,000 bail. 

Dederich was arrested on a fugitive warrant Saturday at his 
home in Lake Havasu City by Mohave County sheriff's deputies, 
and Los Angeles officials had sought to have him arraigned im- 
mediately. 

But Los Angeles district attorney's spokesman AI Albergate said, 
"He was too drunk to be taken to court," and instead was sent by 
ambulance to the hospital. 



1 
I 




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Opinions 



Post-holocaust 
paranoia 

In this, the 36th anniversary year of the first controlled splitting of 
the atom, President Carter has announced his plans to ask Congress 
for a billion-dollar appropriation to revive the civil defense 
program— in hopes of saving part of the U.S. population in the event 
of an all-out nuclear war. 

Carter's rather sudden interest in post-holocaust survival was 
kindled by a recent CIA report which revealed the Soviets' civil 
defense capabilities are far more extensive than ours. Apparently, 
the Soviets have been spending $2 billion annually to construct 
bomb shelters and to plan evacuations. 

The CIA report indicated that in the event of a nuclear war, 
Russia could limit its casualties to the low tens of millions— 
provided they had a week or so to carry out their evacuation plans. 
On the other hand, it has been speculated the U.S. would lose from 
70 to 80 million citizens, even with an evacuation of major cities. 

Carter's plans for civil defense include a "test plan" for the 
evacuation of 400 communities throughout the country. Under this 
plan, detailed instructions for a hypothetical evacuation would be 
left on front porches along with the morning paper. 

The basic tenet of the plan is that city dwellers will be able to 
drive away from blasted urban areas to selected "host" areas in the 
countryside. The Soviet equivalent to this plan is for Russian ur- 
banites to walk out of the cities and dig trenches in which to escape 
the radiation. 

If you think all this sounds rather absurd, you're not the only one. 
"Utter foolishness" was the expression used by one of Carter's 
arms control aides to describe the suggestion that the American 
populace could be saved by these evacuations. 

Carter's civil defense chief, Bardyl Tirana, reportedly said about 
the plan, "I don't know if it would work in an actual crisis." Defense 
Secretary Harold Brown commented that the shelter program of 
the early '60s "didn't take then, and I don't think it would now." 

One explanation for Carter's interest in civil defense is the 
leverage it would provide him in his efforts to gain Senate 
ratification of a new strategic arms limitation treaty. Carter wants 
to placate the senators who view Russia's civil defense program as 
one more military capability that has to be met or topped by the 
U.S. 

Another possible result of Carter's doomsday plans is the 
heightening of holocaust paranoia among Americans. Such fear 
leads to public sentiment favoring increased military spending, 
which in turn hinders detente. Maybe Carter should change his 
tactics, showing the Soviets a little trust instead of always trying to 
outdo them. 

SCOTT STUCKEY 
Assistant Editorial Editor 

Junking America 



Is the alarming amount of land pollution 
part of a communist plot to take over 
America? 

That's what Christine Winter, a Chicago 
Tribune writer, wrote in a recent article that 
appeared in the Wichita Eagle, Winter 
wrote, "Perhaps when Nikita Khrushchev 



Luke Brown 



made his dramatic 'we will bury you' threat 
years go, what he really had in mind was a 
subversive plan to fill our mailboxes with 
junk, bombard us with nonreturnable 
bottles that bounce, and teach us to eat out 
of aluminum trays, cardboard buckets and 
paper sacks. 

"The junking of America could very 
easily be part of a Communist plot that will 
render all of us too slovenly to save our- 
selves. Those anxious to defend our shores 
when the Russians start coming won't be 
able to find their guns amid the clutter," she 
wrote, 

Perhaps Winter is not far off base. While 1 
seriously doubt that Leonid Brezhnev is 
sitting in the Kremlin clapping his hands in 
glee because Pepsi bottles can't be returned 
or because Big Macs come in styrofoam 
packages, there is a serious pollution 
problem . 

The biggest problem about the soaring 
amount of garbage is that no one seems to 
care about it, or to be willing to do much to 
solve i I 

The Environmental Awareness Center 
lEAC) collected newspaper last year. This 
year, however, only one residence hall, 



West, is collecting newspapers, which it 
donates to EAC. West Hall practically has to 
fight EAC to pick the newspapers up. 

Why is EAC reluctant to pick up the 
newspapers? They say, "Well, the price has 
gone down for newsprint, and it's kinda hard 
to find someone to take the newsprint, and 
well, it takes quite a bit of time, and...." 

Indeed the price for newsprint has gone 
down, from $40 a ton last year to $25 this 
year. That is still $25. Probably, with a little 
bit of organization and effort, EAC could get 
enough papers from the residence halls 
alone to make the venture worthwhile. 

For the money they need to operate, 
perhaps EAC could collect aluminum cans, 
which are, from personal observation, fairly 
abundant, especially on weekends. 
Aluminum brings a better price than 
newsprint, could be redeemed easier and 
since aluminum is not biodegradable, there 
is a great need for recyejing it. 

But, they say they haven't thought about 
that 

Instead of bashing their heads against 
trees trying to save whales or stop nuclear 
energy, EAC would put their energies to 
better use by cleaning up the environment 
on this campus and lobbying to get a bill 
passed through the Kansas Legislature that 
would outlaw the sale of non-returnable 
bottles. 

A big issue currently in Riley County is 
where to put a new landfill. With efforts of 
EAC and the cooperation of students, 
perhaps the pollution rate could be slowed 
down and we wouldn't have to scar our land 
su often with unsightly landfills. 

(jr. if ior no better reason, to save our 
country from the Husskys. 




Letters 



KSDB offers variety 



Editor, 

Re: Jerry Berkowitz's comment about 

KSDB's choice of music formats. 

On the surface it does seem reasonable 
that KSDB provide some alternative 
programming— and to a degree, that's what 
the station tries to do. A careful check of the 
KSDB programming schedule reveals that 
the station does program several hours per 
week of alternative programming, including 
gospel rock (3.5 hours), jazz (7 hours), and 
disco and soul (6 hours). 

In addition, the station has in the past 
programmed up to six hours per night of so- 
called "progressive" music from midnight 
to six a.m. During the time that Berkowitz 
has been at K-State, the station has also 
presented C&W and classical music at 
various times. 

Music has always been a problem that 
KSDB constanUy struggles with. If you 



program a steady diet of "alternative" 
(read "not terribly popular with most 
folks") formats, your audience becomes 
very small, and funding (read "existence") 
is threatened. 

One of the problems with a college radio 
station such as KSDB is that people with 
time, talent and expertise to do good 
"alternative" radio music programs are not 
always available. Fact is that unless an 
announcer has a special knowledge of the 
music he's playing, "popular" music is 
easier to control and to program than other 
types. 

KSDB is not a closed shop, either to ideas 
or to people. If Berkowitz or anyone else has 
an idea about an "alternative" program 
they would like to try, give us a call. 

Bob Fidler 
KSDB faculty advisor 



Renovation a mishandling of fees 



Editor, 

Re: Renovation of buildings important for 

campus beauty. 

We agree that renovation of older 
buildings is vital to our campus' historical 
image, but we feel that the funds being used 
for current renovation could have been 
more wisely allocated. 

The renovation of President Acker's office 
seems to be a mishandling of our student 
fees and taxes. We feel the projected 
$100,000 set aside for this renovation could 
have been better spent on more pressing 
projects. 

This funding could have been used toward 
improving the conditions of certain student 
areas, such as Seaton Court, existing sport 
facilities and Calvin Hall. For many weeks 
there have been letters complaining about 
the roof leakage in the older part of Farrell 
Library. Part of the funding could have been 



The Collegian welcomes letters from 
readers concerning the content of the 
paper, or any comments on either 
national or local issues. 

All letters must be signed and include 
proper identification, including title or 
classification, major and telephone 
number. No anonymous letters will be 
printed. 

Letters may be submitted (preferably 
typed) in Kedzie 103 or the editorial desk 
in the newsroom. 



used to speed repairs on these leaks which 
would have prevented further deterioration 
of the murals. 

It is really a shame that President Acker 
feels that he needs a new office when 
students are using inadequate and an- 
tiquated facilities in such places as Seaton 
Court. 

This funding has already been 
appropriated for this renovation. Therefore 
it is too late to alter the situation, but in the 
Tuture more insight should be used in 
determinig what could be renovated. 

Charles W. Moore 

BrainJ.FeenGy 

Kevin Biesemeyer 

juniors in architecture 

Thanks for nothing 

Editor, 

To the Farrell Library staff members who 
refused to check out books to a group of us at 
4 p.m. Saturday. 

Obviously the few minutes that you saved 
by not checking out the books greatly out- 
weighed in importance any research work 
we could have done with the material from 
then until library opening Sunday. I was 
under the apparently misguided impression 
that the library is at least in part a student 
related facility. 

Steve Frick 
senior in geography 



Kansas Collegian 

*— ' (USPSltl 



Monday, December 4, 1978 



State 



(USPS 2*1-010) 



THE COLLEGIAN Is published bv Student Publication!, Inc , Kansas State University, dally except Saturday, 
Sundays, holidays and vacation periods 

OFFICES are In the north wing ol Kediie Hall, phone S32 A554 

SECOND CLASS postage paid at Manhattan. Kansas «*MJ 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES; 11 J, one calendar year, STM, one semester 

THE COLLEGIAN (unctions in a legally autonomous relationship with the University and is written and edited by 
students serving the University community 

Paul Rhodes. Editor 
Te/ry Brungardt, Advertising Manager 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mori., D«c«mb«r4,197B 



. KSDB tape recorder stolen 



6 



A reel-to-reel stereo tape recorder was 
stolen from a KSDB studio sometime before 
Thanksgiving vacation, according to Bob 
Fidler, assistant professor of journalism 
and mass commmunications. 

Fidler said the machine would cost about 
$2,500 to replace and was the best of three 
smoke-damaged machines purchased 
during the summer of 1974 for $100 each. 

He said the machine was discovered 
missing when some students asked, before 
the holiday, to use it during Thanksgiving. 

Icy streets: 
36 accidents 

ley streets were the cause of 3© car ac- 
cidents as light precipitation and sub- 
t reezing temperatures caused Manhattan's 
streets to freeze Saturday. 

According to the Hiley County Police 
Department, the freezing drizzle caused a 
glaze on the streets. The slippery conditions 
caused a loss in traction for motorists, 
resulting in the large number of accidents. 

According to Bob Chard, Manhattan's 
street superintendanl, four city crews spent 
most of the day and part of the evening 
salt ingand sanding the city's streets. 

"The department's first priority was to 
salt and sand the city's main streets. Then 
we began working on the side streets which 
are on hills," he said. 

Chard said the street department was 
informed of the icy conditions by Accu- 
Weather, the Pennsylvania-based 
lorecasling service, early enough to ready 
city crews to treat the streets. 

Drugs stolen from 
Blue Hills store 

An armed robbery at Norton's Drug Store 
located at Blue Hills Shopping Center in 
north Manhattan at approximately 4 p.m. 
Saturday resulted in the loss of numerous 
drugs of an unknown value. 

According to the Riley County Police 
Department iRCPD), no weapon was ac- 
tually seen by either the clerk at the store or 
ihe pharmacist but said they were given the 
distinct impression the suspect was armed. 

The suspect is described as a white male, 
25 to 27 years old, with a ruddy complexion. 

He was described as wearing a black 
stocking cap, an old jean jacket and 
motorcycle boots. The suspect was also 
reported as driving a stolen 1972 gray 
Mercedes Benz. 

The car, owned by Renzie Poe, 1511 
Leavenworth, had been reported stolen to 
the RCPD only minutes before the robbery 
occured. 




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"The machine would have to have been 
stolen by someone familiar with the area 
(KSDB station)... knowing where it was," 
Fidler said. He said they would have to know 
when the area was not locked. 

The station area is locked whenever 
possible, Fidler said. It is left open 
sometimes for "convenience of (radio-tv) 
students," he said, but will now have to be 
continually locked up. 

The machine was used to produce 
programs for KSDB Radio and used in 
advanced radio production classes, Fidler 
said. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Moo., December 4, 1978 



J-board enforces rules; 
guards residents 9 rights 



A Ford Hall resident was recently accused 
of stealing from the hall and was asked to 
leave by 5p.m. Friday, 

A Marlatt Hall resident, accused of 
disturbing other residents with loud noise 
and stereo music, was put on disciplinary 
probation. 

According to Sue Walek, Ford Hall 
judicial vice president, the woman had been 
warned of her illegal actions several times 
by the hall director, so the judicial board 
voted to recommend she leave. 

"The director of housing has the final say 
on all recommendations of removing a 
resident from a hall unless she appeals the 
decision," Walek said. 

John Lippman, Marlatt Hall judicial vice 
president, said the Marlatt resident was 
placed on disciplinary probation with the 
warning that his stereo could be impounded 
later. 

"The reason behind the stereo- 
impounding decision was it was the ap- 
propriate action for that particular incident. 
In other words, it worked, and we try to do 
what works. It's not a right, but a privilege, 
to have a stereo in a residence hall," he said. 

"This is University housing, which is state 
property, and it's your privilege to live here. 
You're not forced to live here. Therefore, 
you have to live and get along with others," 
Lippman said. 

EACH OF these incidents was taken up by 
the hall judicial boards. A judicial board is a 



peer group set up in residence halls to act as 
a disciplinary board to enforce hall rules 
and regulations that are broken by the 
residents. 

Each K-State residence hall has certain 
guidelines set up to protect the rights of 
other residents. If these rights are violated, 
the judicial board investigates and hears the 
case, at which time disciplinary sanctions 
can be applied. 

These sanctions include disciplinary 
probation, counseling sessions, work 
projects, different living arrangements or 
paying for damages. The most severe 
sanction can be removal from the residence 
hall 

"There was a case last year where some 
girls had a party and were making a lot of 
noise late at night," Walek said. "After 
being told to be quiet several times, a J- 
board representative went up there and one 
of the girls was very rude to her. They were 
brought before the board and were to do 
some menial task within the hall." 

Persons who are brought before the 
judicial board have the right to appeal 
decisions of the J-board to the K -State 
Student Tribunal until 5 p.m. of the next 
class day. 

WALEK SAID two years ago they had a 
stealing case, in which the girl accused was 
to have counseling the first time but she 
didn't seek it. J-board was going to kick her 
m (see J-BOARDS r j». 7) 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon.,Pte«nbf 4.1W1 



G 




Family's luck takes turn for better 



OMAHA, Neb. (AP)— Frank Larabee, a 
42-year-old father of six, was upset when his 
1969 car needed repairs that would cost 
more than the car's value. He'd just been 
hired as a baker for a doughnut firm after 
several months of unemployment. 

Friends and neighbors offered rides so the 
Larabees could do errands. The day after 



Thanksgiving, a stranger knocked at their 
door. He pointed to a red 1971 station wagon 
in the driveway. "Just sign the sales slip," 
be told Mrs. Larabee, "and the car is 

yours." 

The man explained that an anomymous 
donor had picked out the car, paid for it and 
asked that it be delivered to the Larabees. 



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Restful eyes 

Jim Cook, junior in business marketing, takes a break from studying at 
Farrell Library Saturday afternoon. 



J-Board's job: 
w evaluate 

(continued from p.6) 
out, Walek said, but she appealed* it to 
tribunal and was allowed to stay the rest of 
the year. 

According to the Student Governing 
Association constitution, before an in- 
dividual can be called before the J-board, he 
is to be notified in writing of any charges 
against him at least two days before the 

hearing. 

The notice is to contain the charges, the 
name of plaintiff charging the student, a 
summary of the evidence upon which the 
charges are based, a statement of the 
court's decision, a copy of the judicial code 
of K-State, and the time, date and place of 
the hearing. 

According to Lippman, once someone is 
brought before judicial board, a set 
procedureis followed. 

"The person is informed that he will be 
notified in writing the next day of the 
decision we make," Lippman said. 

ACCORDING TO the Marlatt Hall con- 
stitution, a panel of five voting members of 
the judicial board has to be present before 
the board can make an official decision. A 
majority of the J-board makes all decisions. 

"Just like any court of law, we try to fit 
the sanction with what was done," he said. 

"There is a necessary reason for a judicial 
board to be present in each residence hall. It 
is a body that can listen and evaluate what 
has happened before it is taken any further, 
so it's easier to handle it in a residence 
hall," Lippman said. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon., D«c*mber4, 1978 




r> 




ACTIVITIES CALENDAR 

DECEMBER 




DATE 



FRIDAY 



SATURDAY 



Sunday 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 5 



WEDNESDAY 6 



THURSDAY 7 



FRIDAY 8 



SATURDAY 



POOLS 



6:00 7 :3fl 
11:30- 3:30 

7 i?HQ'M 



1:00- 5:00 
7:00-10:00 



SUNDAY 10 



MONDAY 1 1 



IUESQAY 12 



WEDNESDAY 13 



I HURSOAY 1 4 



FRIDAY 15 



SATURDAY 16 



SUNDAY 17 



MONDAY 18 



1UESDAY 19 



WEDNESDAY 20 



1:00- 5:00 
7:00-10:00 



GYM 



6:00- 7:30 

1:30-12:30 

30- 5:00 



VOLLEYBALL TOUKUEY 
8:00a -10:00 p 



"OB - 

11:30- 

7:30- 



11:30- 
C L 



-7T3T 
12:30 

10; OS 



3:30 

s l a 



i:00 

1 1 : 30 

7:30 



12:30 
10:00 



11:30 

7:31 



11:30- 
7:30- 



w 

3:30 

10:00 



773T 

3:30 

10:00 



1:00- 4:00 
CLOSED 



1:00- 5:00 
7:00-10:00 



6:00 

11:30 

7:30 



6:00- 

11 : 3D- 

7:30- 



-II 



THURSDAY 2) 



FRIDAY 22 



SATURDAY 23 



SUNDAY 24 



> DAY 25 



TUESDAY 26 



WE0NE50AY 27 



THURSDAY 28 



FRIDAY 29 



SATURUAY 30 



SUNDAY 31 



6:00- 

11:30- 

7:30- 



J2 



;:00 
1 1 : 30 
C L 



1:00- 5:00 
]M Volleyball 



6:00- 7:30 

11:30-12:30 

IW Volleyball 



6:00- 7:30 
11:30-12:30 
HOME 



6:00- 7:30 

11:30-12:30 

IM Volleyball 

4:00- 7:36" 

11:30-12:30 

IM Volleyball 



6:00- 7:30 

11:30-12:30 

7:30-10:00 



1:00- 4:00 
HOME 



FH 



60- Mo 

30-12:30 
00-10:00 



30- 5:00 
00-10:00 



CLOSED 
7:00-11:30 



6:00 

11:30 

A 5 K E 



12:30 
11:30 



- 7:30 
12:30" 
T BU 



7T3T 

12:30 
11:30 



12:30 
11: 



£ 



7? 

12:30 
10:00 



CLOSED 
f A S K E T 8 A L I 



1:00- 5:00 
IM Volleyball 



30 
30 
00 



6:00- 7:30 
11:30-12:30 

1H Volleyball 



11:30- 
7:30- 



■ 7:30 

■ 3:30 
S E D 



3:30 

1 : on 



1:00- 4:00 
CLOSED 



1:00- 5:00 
7:00-10:00 



NO EARL 
11:30-12:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30-12:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30-12:30 
7:^-10:00 



11:30- 2:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30-12:30- 
CLOSED 



CLOSED 



CLOSED 



6:00- 7:30 
11:30-12:30 

IM Vol leyb all 



00- 7:30 
30-12:30 
30-10:00 



6:00- 7:30 

11:30-12:30 
HOME , 



6:00- 7:30 

11:30-12:30 

7:30-10:00 



1:00- 4:00 
- NOME 



1:00- 5:00 
7:00-10:00 



C I R D UN 
11:30-12:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30-12:30 

7:30-10:00 



11:30-12:30 
7:30-10:00 



CLOSED 
7:00-10:00 



00- 7:30 
30-12:30 

■■"■'■''■-" 



6:00- 7:30 

11:30-12:30 

Women's Basketball 



00- 7:30 
30-12:30 
00-10:00 



6:00- 7:30 
11:30-12:30** 
ft 5 K £ T B A L 



6:00- 7:30 

11:30-12:30 

8:00-10:00 



CLOSED 
ASKETBALl 



C L S E 
7:00-10:00 



WEIGHT 
ROOM 



6:00- 7:30 

11:30- 1:00 

7:30-10:00 



1:00- 5:00 
7:00-10:00 



1:00- 5:00 
7:00-11:30 



o:6o- J:M. 

11:30- 1:00 

7:30-11:30 



6:00- 7":30 

11:30- 1:00 

GAME 



06- 7:30 
30- 1:00 
30-11:30 



06- 7:30 

30- 1:00 

0-11:30 



00- 7:30 
30- 1:00 
30-10:00 



1:00- 4 
GAME 



Hit 



GYMNAS. 
ROOM 



7:00-10:00 



7:30-10:00 



7:30-10:00 



1:00- 5:00 
7:00-10:00 



6:00- 7:30 
11:30- 1:00 

7:30-11:10 



6:00- 7:30 

11:30- 1:00 

7:30-11:30 



6:00- 7:30 

11:30- 1:00 

7:30-10:00 



7:30 
ltOO 

'i fl i* I 



6:00- 
11:30- 



6:00- 7:30 

11:30- 1:00 

7:30-10:00 



1:00- 4:00 
GAME 



1:00- 5:00 
7:00-10:00 



1 I 



5 E C 
11:30-12:30 
8:00-10:00 



11:30-12:30 
8:00-10:00 



11:30-12:30 
8:00-10:00 



11:30-12:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30-12:30 
CLOSED 



CLOSED 



CLOSED 



L L F A C 



11:30- 1:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30- 1:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30- 1:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30- 1:30 
CLOSED 



CLOSED 



CLOSED 



L I T I E S C 1 



11:30- 1:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30- 1:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30- 1:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30- 1:30 

CLOSED 



CLOSED 



CLOSED 



11:30-12:30 
8:00-10:00 



11:30-12:30 
CLOSED 



CLOSED 



CLOSED 



S E 



11:30- 1:30 
8:00-10:00 



11:30- 1:30 
8:00-10:00 



11:30- 1:30 
0:00-10:00 



11:30- 1:30 
CLOSED 



CLOSED 



CLOSED 



S E K E 5 T 
11:30- 1:00 
7:30-10:00 



11:30- 1:00 
7:30-10:00 



c L S E 
UNTIL 
SECOND 

EMESTE 



H:30- 1:00 
7:30-10:00 



11:30-12:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30-12:30 
CLOSED 



CLOSED 



C L S E 



M E R 3 Y 



11:30- 1:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30- 1:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30- 1:30 
7:30-10:00 



11:30- 1:30 
CLOSED 



CLOSED 



CLOSED 



7:00-10:00 



7:30-10:00 



7:30-10:00 



7:00-10:00 



H R I S 



T M A 1 



WASHBUttS 
COMPLEX 



Check-out and 
rental center 
closed until 
spring. 
Requests for 
equipment 
thru main 
office only. 



IM 
DATES 



#*» NOTE *#i 

** = main court 
of the 
fieldhouse 
reserved at 
noon for 
visiting 
basketball 
team for 
practice. 



Gym 



CENlURY CLUB 
CARDS DUE 



FINAL 



WEEK 



RHYT 
AERO 



12 n 
FH 



12 n 
Gym 



12 n 
FH 



l7n 

30 



fh 



12 n 
FH 



T7TT FI( 

6:30 
Gjffi 



i7., F 
6;30 



12 n 
FH 



6 : 30 J "' 

'J— 



12 n 
FH 



PROG. 
EXER V 



11:40 
FH 



11:40 
FH 



11:40 

Gym 



11:40 
FH 



1:40 
FH 



11:40 
FH 



11:40 

FH 



11:40 
FH 



11:40 
FH 



:; 1 



1:40 
Ely n 



AQUA 
FIT. 



11:30 
Pools 



7:30 
Pools 



11:30 
Pools 



7:30 
Pools 



11:30 
Pools 



11:30 

I : M 

Pools 



7:30 
Pools 



11:30 
Pools 



: 3C 
lis 



11:40 11:30 

ru 'Pools 



12n FH 
6:30 



7*n 
6:30 



12 n 

FH 



12 n 
FH 



12 n 
FH 



11:40, 7:M 
FK I Pool s 



11:40 7:30 
FH Pools 



11:40 
FH 



11:40 
FH 



11:40 
TH 



11:30 
Pools 



ALL EXERCISES 
OVER UNTIL SECOND 
SEMESTER. 




BASKETBALL 

OFFICIALS 

NEEDED 



Beginning 

Second 

Semester 



PLAN AHEAD FOR SECOND SEMESTER 

Jon. 17— Basketball Officials Meeting-4 p.m. Union 212 
Jan. 18-Rec. Leaders Meeting for Basketball and Water 
Basketball— 4 p.m. in Union Forum Hall. 

Jan. 19- DEADLINE -Basketball & Water Basketball 



Happenings Sponsored By: 



SMITH 

SPOHTtNGGOO[>S 
DOWNTOWN 



£PR& 

SHOPPE 



In Aggievtlle 



ATHLETE'S 
WAY 



Believers in (the Importance) of Recreation and Fitness 



Fire guts airport hangar 



CLAY CENTER-An estimated $250,000 
damage was caused by a fire early Saturday 
at the Clay Center Municipal Airport which 
destroyed a hangar, its contents and two 
vehicles parked beside the hangar. 

Clay Center Police Chief Larry 
Moss burgh said the fire was reported at 
12:06 a.m. by a neighbor in the area. The 
airport is located one mile west of Clay 
Center and 35 miles northwest of Manhat- 
tan. 

Mossburgh said the hangar and its con- 
tents were a total loss. Airport manager 
Mike Spicer said he was unsure of the loss 
from fire, but estimated it would be about 
$250,000. 

Destroyed in the fire were Spicer's office, 
flight instruction equipment, toots, two 
vehicles and two single-engine aircraft he 
owned. The two vehicles destroyed outside 
the hangar— a 1961 Cadillac and a 1974 
mobile home— were also owned by Spicer. 

ALSO DESTROYED in the fire were four 



other privately-owned aircraft inside the 
hangar. 

Four fire trucks from the Clay Center, 
Clay County and Miltonvale fire depart- 
ments responded to the alarm, according to 
Francis Johnson, Clay Center fire chief, 

Johnson said firefighters battled the blaze 
for more than two hours, but were unable to 
enter the structure. Firefighters sprayed 
the building with water to contain the fire, 
Johnson said. 

Johnson said no one was injured in the 
blaze, and no cause has been determined, 
but the fire is still under investigation. 

The four-year-old hangar, owned by the 
city, was insured for more than $40,000 and 
will probably be replaced, according to Clay 
Center Mayor William Logan. 

Spicer said his two planes, one of the 
vehicles in the hangar— a 1967 Jaguar 
XKE— and the two vehicles outside the 
hangar were insured. He 1 said he was unsure 
how much of the hangar's other contents 
were insured. 



Olson's Shoe Service 



Complete Western Boot Repair 
Orthopedic Corrections 
Hand Tooled Belts 
Ouoddy Moc's 
Athletic Shoe Repair 
Buckles -All Kindt 
Shoe Care Items 




1214 Moro in Aggieville 




5 1 a it pnoto by Oav* Ka up 



AFTERMATH... Airport Manager Mike Spicer inspects the fire damage 
at the Clay Center Airport Saturday. 



you say you doi\1 
know what to £: 




give-a-book ! 

•for Birthday 
•for Christmas 
•for Any Occasion 

The givc-a-book' certificate is a new promotion 
offered through the KrState Union bookstore 
in cooperation with the American Booksellers 

Association and the National Association of W 

College Stores. 

These certificates are redeemable for books at 
face value at any one of over 700 participating 
bookstores nationwide. 

Its the perfect gift ! 




k-state union 

bookstore 



maMer LfuN» 



war 



0901 



mm 



10 



KANSAS STATH COLLEQtAN, Won, Q»c«i*tr 4, tttt 




ABOVE. ..After receiving a packet of 
race rules and route maps contestants 
then had to decipher them, a last minute 
course change made for some confusion. 
RIGHT,. .Giving some fatherly advice 
and helpful directions, a father of one of 
the youngest runners points the way to 
the Two Mile Fun Run. BELOW...WIth a 
crack of the starters gun the runners are 



off and running in the first annual Little 
Apple Run. LOWER LEFT...Chet 
Peters, vice-president for student affairs 
wipes ice from his face, Peters ran a 
majority of the race with his glasses 
frozen over. BOTTOM... Patty Hilyard, 
of Sallna, packs her trophy away and 
prepares to head home to a nice warm 
house. 




Statt photo by Bo Radcr 







Little Apple: a fun run 



By SUSAN SHEPHERD 
Contributing Writer 

While most people stayed warm and cozy in their homes 
Saturday, about 500 people withstood the below-freezing 
temperatures and freezing rain to run in the Little Apple Road 
Race and Fun Run at the Tuttle Creek River Pond Area. 

The event, sponsored by First National Bank and co- 
sponsored by Ballard's Sports Shop and the K-State- 
Manhattan Track Club, included a 10,000-meter (6.2-mile) road 
race and a 2-mile "fun run." All proceeds, went to the United 
Way of Riley County. 

Eugene Russell, associate professor in civil engineering, 
was the race director. 

"The man behind the scenes,' ' as he likes to call himself, was 



[l 



I! 




Don Keith, a track club member and member of the organizing 
committee. 

"It's a regular event around this area. And it's just about 
year-round," he said. "We have races all over, in Kansas City, 
Topeka and Salina in all seasons. 

"This race is open to everyone. Today, I think our youngest 
is 8 years old and the oldest is 61 . We give out the most awards 
of any race in Kansas." 

THERE WERE 10 age divisions for men and women, with 
more than 400 awards available. 

Not everyone was an avid runner; most people were there 
because it was "fun." 

Sandy Murphy, assistant instructor in biochemistry, said 
she wasn't really into running, although she did enjoy other 

sports. 

"I'm really into tennis, biking and racquetball. I guess I'm 
here to give Donna (a friend) moral support; she's the runner. 
And I guess I just didn't want to be left out," Murphy said. 

Janel LeValley, freshman in general and a member of K- 
State's women's cross country team, said the weather didn't 
matter. "Well, I nave to run today anyway," LeValley said. 
She went on to place first in the overall women's division. 

The 10,000-meter route had to be changed due to the icy 

weather. „ , . 

But bad weather didn't keep many people away. Making 
light of the situation, Seth Studley, Monte McNeil and Steven 
Thompson, all K-State students, said they had taken extra 
precautions for the slick pavement, putting studs in their 
shoes. 

SO THE RACE was on. Although the 6.2 mile course 
somehow turned out to be about a quarter of a mile short and 
the two-mile course turned out to be about 3.3 miles, it was a 
"pretty good race," according to Keith, 

The overall winner in the 10,000 meter race was Frank 
Richardson of Kansas City. 

Chet Peters, vice president for student affairs, took third in 
the 55-year-old-and-over division. Jerry Morrison, a world- 
record-holder for his age group, took first. At 56, Morrison says 
he never misses a day of running. 



^ 



~1 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon, Doeemb«r4,1978 



11 



fl 



*> 



Hartman 's 300th— How sweet it is! 



By JIM GIBBONS 

Sports Editor 
K-State proved Saturday against Southern 
Methodist University that it's never easy to 
win on the road. But the Wildcats' win over 
SMU was doubly sweet for Head Coach Jack 
Hartman. It was his team's first road win of 



Sports 



the young season and his 300th major college 
career victory. 

Hartman's Wildcats enlarged a 43-35 
halftlme lead to 36-4) midway through the 
final period and appeared ready to blow the 
game open. But the Mustangs fought back to 
take the lead 77-76 with 3:49 remaining. 

However, the Wildcats responded to the 
challenge, outscoring SMU 10-6 over the 
final three and a half minutes to eke out an 
86-83 win in Dallas, Tex. That gave the 'Cats 
a split of their short two-game road trip 
after losing 61-55 to Oral Roberts on Thur- 
sday. 

Freshman Ed Nealy led all scorers with 26 
points on 11-16 shooting from the field and a 
four-of-five performance from the free 
throw line. 

However, the 'Cats turned in one of their 
most balanced offensive performances, with 
four of the five starters in double figures. 

Guards Glenn Marshall and Rolando 
Blackmail had 15 and 14 points, respec- 
tively. Senior center Steve Soldner added 13 

and forward Jari Wills added nine. Fresh- 
3 



man Tyrone Adams contributed eight 
points, all in the first half, and Dean Danner, 
battling a cold, chipped in one to round out 
the scoring. 

HIGH-POINT MEN for SMU were 64 
center Reggie Franklin with 16, 6-5 Richard 
Harris with 10 and reserve John James with 
14. 

K-State shot a blistering 66.7 percent in 
the opening period to forge their lead. The 
Wildcats hit 20 of 30 shots from the field in 
the first half. However, the 'Cats could 
manage only three of six from the free throw 
line. 

K-State ended the game with a torrid 64.9 
percent field goal shooting, hitting 37 of 57 
shots. Nealy led the way with 11 of 16 
shooting while Black man was seven of 11, 
including six for eight in the second half. 
Adams was four of five and Wills hit four of 
seven. Juco transfer Marshall rounded out 
the percentages, hitting six of 10. 

In contrast, the Wildcats didn't fare 
nearly as well at the free throw line, hitting 
only 12 of 25 and missing several one-and- 
one opportunities in the second half. Nealy 
was the only player who turned in a 
respectable performance at the line, sinking 
four of five. 

Nealy fueled the first half charge, hitting 
eight of 12 from the field. Nealy's outside 
shooting helped crack the zone defense the 
Mustangs opened with. 

THE WILDCATS again scorched the nets 
to begin the second half by hitting their first 
four shots. But K-State went cold midway 



through the period and SMU reeled off 13 
unanswered points to make it 70-69. 

Soldner broke the drought with a dunk but 
the Mustangs fought back to take the lead 
for the first time in the contest at 77-76. 

That brought the crowd of 6.087 at Moody 
Coliseum to its feet, and it looked like the 
Wildcats might fold. 



But the Wildcats broke the SMU press to 
score several easy baskets, and Soldner 
blocked two Mustang shots to help preserve 
the victory. 

K-State is now 3-1 on the season and 
returns home to host Minnesota in Ahearn 
Field House Tuesday night. 



.Jamaica 




May 19-26 



$349 



INFO. 
MEETING 



7RM. 
THUR., DEC. 7 
K-STATE UNION 212 



D 



k-state 



upc trave 



%F° 



IQIIlfl 



Texas trip nets women cagers 
a. big victory and a close loss 



f 



The K-State women's basketball team 
spent the weekend in Texas, beating Texas 
Tech 83-66 Friday and losing 76-71 to 
nationally ranked Wayland Baptist 
Saturday. 

The Wildcats forged a slim 36-35 halftime 
lead against Texas Tech with Eileen 
Feeney's 14 points leading the way. 

The score was knotted at 55 with 12:31 left 
in the contest when K-State outscored Tech 
20-6 over the next six minutes to blow the 
game open. 

Feeney led all scorers with 22 points. 
Center Margo Jones added 15 points and 12 
rebounds and guards Tami Johnson and 

Bradley leads 
K-State lifters 

Four students from K-State placed as the 
K-State Wetghtli fling Club took second place 
at the Missouri Valley Open Meet Saturday. 
Kay Bradley, who had placed first at the 
Canadian Invitational and placed first last 
week at the Kansas State Powerlifting Meet, 
look first in the Open with 353 pounds in the 
snatch and 303 pounds in the jerk. 

Bradley had lifted 385 pounds in the bench 
press, 485 pounds in the squat and 650 
pounds in the deadweight lifting when he 
took first at the stale meet last week. 

Kevin Fulton placed fourth in the Open, 
taking second in the 18-19-year-old class. 
John Hennessy took first in the 181 -pound 
class with a 165-pound snatch and 209 clean 
and jerk. He received the Best Newcomer 
Award for his performance at the Open, 
James Garfield took fourth in the 242-pound 
class. 



Gayla Williams chipped in 17 and 10, 
respectively. 

Rosemary Scott's 14 points led Texas 
Tech. Teammate Donette Marble added 11 
points and nine rebounds. 

"In the first half, we got off to a slow 
start,'' Head Coach Judy Akers said. "But 
we were able to pull ahead and stand on our 
lead." 

K-State shot 40 percent from the field and 
54 percent from the free throw line. The 
Wildcats turned the ball over 31 times, 22 in 
the first half. Texas Tech committed 25 
turnovers in an error -plagued game. 

Tech fell to 1-6 on the season and K-State 
evened its record at 2-2. 

On Saturday, the Wildcats led 41-39 at the 
half and enlarged their lead over Wayland to 
55-45 with 11:24 left in the game. 

But K-State hit a cold spell and Wayland 
outscored the 'Cats 12-4 over the next few 
minutes. The Flying Queens went on to post 
the victory. 

Leann Wilcox led the Wildcat attack with 
18 points, Forward Laurie Miller added 12 
while Johnson and Feeney had 10 apiece. 

K-State lowered its record to 2-3 and plays 
Nebraska Tuesday in Lincoln. 



WANT INSTANT 
RESPONSIBILITY? 



=S\ 




^ 



Being o missile launch officer in the Air Force is an awesome rospon 
Sitnlity But it's an exciting job with leadership opportunity from the 
word "go ' 

Air Force R0TC can help you prepare lor this exerting field by grant- 
ing two. three or four -year scholarships These will pay lot tuition, 
books, and loo lees, and give you SI0O a month lor some ol your other 
college expenses 

Then, if you can qualify for the missile lield, you can work on an ad- 
vanced degree through special graduate education programs, and the 
Air Force will help with the expenses 

II you're the type who s looking lor on exciting future, a future of com- 
mitment and pride, look into this one See it you qualify to be an Ail 
Force missile launch officer and help perpetuate the traditions lhat 
have mode our country great 

Get the details right away You n he glad you did 
For more information, contact 
Major Grenier. Military Science Bldg., 
Room I OH, or ra II him at < 91 3 ) 532-6600 



annummeirg 



ROTC 

Gotewoy to o great way of life. 




• 



Full Gospel 

Business Men's 

Fellowship International 

Dinner Meeting Dec. 8 

Union Ballroom 6:30 p.m. 

Speaker: 

Harald Bredesen 

Tickets for Sale: 

Until Dec. 5 
Cross-Reference 

Book Store & 

K-State Union 

(No ticket sales at the door.) 





SALE 

ALL SKI CLOTHES 
20% OFF 

Certain Specialty Items 

50% OFF 

Sale includes Coats, Sweaters, Hats, Gloves, Goggles, Suits, 
Bibs, Stretch Pants, Turtle Necks, and Socks. 

SALE FROM DEC. 4th to 6th 
NEW HOURS: MON.-THURS. 10-8 FRI. 10-6, SUN. 12-5 

BREAKAWAY WEST 



12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEOIAN, Mon., D*c«mb.r4, 1978 



Chiefs corral Buffalo 



KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP)-Quarterback 
Mike Livingston drilled a decisive 3-yard 
touchdown strike to Walter White on the 
final play of the third quarter and the 
tenacious Kansas City Chiefs held on toa 14- 
10 victory over the Buffalo Bills Sunday in 
National Football League action. 

Livingston, who finished the afternoon 
with 12 completions on 21 attempts, found 
the big Kansas City tight end in the end zone 
to culminate the 58-yard, 8-play drive. 

The Chiefs, raising their record to 4-10 
with their second straight win, picked off 
three Joe Ferguson passes in the final 
quarter to avenge a 20-13 loss to the Bills 
earlier in the season. 

Kansas City took a quick 7-0 lead in the 
first quarter when Livingston took the 
Chiefs 42 yards in 7 plays. 

Buffalo deadlocked the game with 4 : OS left 
in the first half with a 40-yard touchdown 
pass play from Ferguson to wide receiver 
Frank Lewis to cap an 83-yard march in 
eight plays. 

Both teams missed opportunities before 
their scoring; the Chiefs' Jan Stenerud 
suffered two blocked field goal tries and 
another that bounced off the crossbars. 



TOM DEMSEY kicked a field goal after 
the Bills had a first down at the 2-yard line 
but failed to find the end zone. The Buffalo 
place kicker originally booted a 21-yarder, 
but the Bills declines it in favor of a Kansas 
City roughing penalty that gave them four 
tries from the 2. 

But a holding penalty pushed them back to 
the 12, and two running plays and an in- 
complete pass netted them only eight yards 
to the 4, forcing them to settle for three 
points. 

Eddie Payton returned the ensuing kickoff 
42 yards to the Kansas City 42, and 
Livingston went to work. Four running plays 
by Arnold Morgado and a Buffalo penalty 
moved the Chiefs to the Bills 17, and one 
play later Livingston hit Henry Marshall 
with a 14-yard t ass to the 4. 

Morgado picked up another yard, then 
Livingston connected with White. 

Ferguson had riddled the Kansas City 
secondary in the middle two quarters, but 
the final quarter was a different story as 
Gary Barbara, Thomas Howard and 
Whitney Paul each intercepted passes to 
halt Buffalo drives. 



Nebraska's Osborne considering 
taking over as Colorado coach 



BOULDER, Colo. (AP)-Nebraska 
football coach Tom Osborne and Colorado 
athletic director Eddie Crowder have 
confirmed a two-hour meeting in Lincoln, 
Neb., to discuss CD's football coaching 
vacancy, but they have declined to comment 
on whether Osborne actually has been of- 
fered the job. 

A report from a source close to the five- 
person screening committee CU is using to 
find candidates for the coaching job said the 
post was offered to Osborne by Crowder 
when the two met on Saturday. 

Osborne has denied this. 

But there are signs that indicate Osborne, 
who is preparing his Big 8 champion Cor- 
nhuskers for a rematch with Oklahoma in 
the Orange Bowl on Jan. 1, may be headed 
for Colorado as the successor to Bill 
Mallory, under whom the Buffs had a 6-5 
record in 1978. 

"1 talked to Crowder for about two hours 
on a very tentative basis," Osborne said in 



Lincoln. "I'm sorry there has to be any 
publicity about our meeting. I'm not 
planning to leave Nebraska now. Nebraska 
has been good to me. This is my home." 

Osborne then added, "I'm not saying I 
never would leave, but I like it here." 

When asked directly if he had been offered 
the CU coaching job, Osborne said, "I don't 
want to put Nebraska or CU in a bind." 

Crowder returned to Boulder late 
Saturday night. He met with Osborne in 
Lincoln earlier in the day after attending a 
meeting of Big 8 Conference athletic 
directors in Kansas City. 

Of his meeting with Osborne, Crowder 
said, "1 can't comment on it but we are very 
interested in Osborne, He is a very reserved 
person and he treated it (the meeting) in 
that manner." 

"I've been around long enough to learn 
you've got to listen if someone wants to 
talk," Osborne said. 



5* beer 

and 
Free Pop 




Nickel beer art Imwtm saria pop with off finch Buffet 

Get a nickel beer or a free medium soda pop when you order 

our *2.29 Lunch Buffet, 

All kinds of good things to choose from. Like Thick 'n 

Chewy puza or Thin 'n Crispy pizza or even our new Super 

Supreme pizza. Garden fresh salad from our Do-tt Yourself 

Salad Bar or Cavatini deep-dish pasta. 

And it's ready when you arrive. The '2.29 Lunch Buffet. 

Every weekday from 1 1 30 am to 1 00 pm , At Manhattan 

Pizza Hut restaurants You'll love us for lunch 



Offer good Dec. 4th thru Dec 10th 

at all Manhattan Pizza Huts. 



-Hut 



MHirsdti*o 
to Pizza Hut 

■ PEPSI] 



LAST CHANCE BEFORE FINALS 

35 c bottles of Bud and Natural Lite 
$ 2.00 pitchers. Michelob and Natural on tap. 

"Don't get misconscrewed-iust say Natural" 
T-Shirts $ 3.25 

MERRY-GO-ROUND TAVERN 

601 N. 3rd 

"The Only Revolving Bar in Kansas!" 





Gallery Hours: 

Monday thru Friday 

8:00 a. m.-5 :00 p.m. 



k-state union 



upc arts 



IWIrp 



Come Visit 

the 

K-State Union 

Art Gallery! 

Now Showing: 

TheKSU 
Permanent Art 

Collection 
November 20- 
December 15 



Agrjevifr Westtoor>3nl b Mora 




N CR/ 



417 Poyntz 
776-4303 



9 to 9 

Mon. thru Sat. 

10 to 6 Sun. 



Deck Your Halls... And 
Walls... And Doors... 



. . . and your whole house with holiday decorations 
by Hallmark. Choose a wreath for the mantle, door 
decorations, punch-out decorations for windows or walls 
and many styles of decorations for your tree. Everything 
you need! 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m i it — 

r 

Jrain derailment kills 6; 
pile-up cause unknown 



\ 



SHJPMAN, Va. (AP)— Six persons were 
killed and at least 60 were injured early 
Sunday when a Southern Railway passenger 
train jumped the tracks on a curve and piled 
into a ravine in mountainous south-central 
Virginia early Sunday, authorities said. 

Refugee toll 
reaches 350 

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP)-Two 
boats packed with Vietnamese refugees 
sank off Malaysia's northeast coast and in 
the Gulf of Thailand Sunday, drowning at 
least 26 and sending the known death toll 
from such incidents in the past two weeks 
past 350. 

Hundreds more refugees slipped through 
stepped -up Malaysian coastal patrols. 
There were more reports that ethnic 
Chinese, who make up most of the new 
arrivals, are buying their way out of Viet- 
nam. 

At least 18 refugees drowned when their 
boat off the southern Thai city of Narthiwat , 
where they had been refused permission to 
land Saturday. More than 300 swam ashore. 
Police said they may have scuttled their 
boat to avoid having to sail on, and that the 
number of dead may be higher since no one 
was sure how many the boat carried. 

The other boat sank off Mechang on 
Malaysia's northeast coast, where hundreds 
of refugees land daily. One body was 
recovered and seven others were feared 
drowned. 

On Saturday, 139 refugees drowned or 
were lost and feared dead after a boat that 
was refused permission to land sank north of 
Mechang. Four more survivors from that 
wreck were found Sunday. 

At Kuala Trengganu, in the same region, 
police threw a rope to a refugee boat in 
rough surf and towed it ashore. All 160 oc- 
cupants landed safely, but police said one 
died of a heart attack as he reached shore. 



A severely injured cook was trapped for It 
hours in the debris of the smashed dining 
car, his legs pinned beneath a stove. 
Workers used bulldozers to peel back the 
side of the car and then lift the heavy stove 
from the cook, Ned Haynes of Atlanta. 

Dr. Kenneth Wallenborn of Charlot- 
tesville, who climbed into the diner to attend 
Haynes, said he had been pinned "from the 
pelvis down" and suffered third-degree 
burns on his chest and stomach and a broken 
ankle and leg. 

At the scene, snow mixed with rain was 
falling in near-freezing temperatures. Blood 
was smeared on windows that had been 
broken when passengers escaped. Inside, 
seats were torn from their moorings and 
mattresses lay piled in a jumble in the 
aisles. 

Four bodies were removed from the huge 
pileup of passenger cars and locomotives, 
and state police said two more bodies were 
known to be in the wreckage. 

ONE WAS identified as Harold Lewis 
Jackson, 59, of Alexandria, Va., a flagman 
on the train. Identities of the others were 
being withheld. 

Seven of the eight passenger cars and 
three of the four diesel locomotives of the 
Southern Crescent train, bound from 
Atlanta to Washington, piled up about 5:40 
a.m. three miles north of Shipman, between 
Charlottesville and Lynchburg. 

A Southern Railway spokesman said the 
train was carrying 65 passengers and a crew 
of about 12. 

Johnny Bridges of Trenton, N.J., and 
Tariq Muhammad of Newark, N.J., were 
credited with leading many passengers to 
safety. 

Bridges said it seemed to him the train 
"was sliding for about 10 minutes" after it 
jumped the tracks. 

Charles Morgret, a spokesman tor the 
Southern Railway, said, "There's no way of 
telling at this early stage what caused the 
derailment." A team from the National 
Transportation Safety Board was on its way 
to investigate. 




jW.V 

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FREE FILMS 



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Wed. 

:•:■:■:■ Dec. 6 



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News Parade 1941 
Marx Brothers Festival 

10:30-11:30-12:30 
Little Theatre 



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upc feature films 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Hon., OmmlMM, 1«7i 



13 



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"NATURAL BUD NI6HT 

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LET'S TALK ABOUT... 

TURMOIL IN IRAN 

with 
Dr. Burton Kaufman 

KSU Depr. of History 

12:30 P.M. 
Wed., Dec. 6 

K-STATE UNION 
CATSKELLER 




ms1002 




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cMAKE 
r THE 




CALL AHEAD - AND SAVE TIME! 
DRIVE-IN 537-0100/VILLAGER 776-9437 
GREAT CALL-AHEAD IDEAS 



BASKETS 

Vistaburger Basket 1.65 

Texasburger Basket 2.35 

Triburger Basket . 3.05 

Fish Basket 1 85 

Pork Fritter Basket 1 .95 

Basket dinners are complete 
with French Fries & Salad. 



SANDWICHES 

Vistaburger .85 

Texasburger 1 .55 

Triburger . 2.25 

Fish Sandwich 1.05 

Pork Fritter 1.15 

Kiddieburger .55 

HotC'Ham 120 

Corn Dog .55 



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Villager. 429 Poyntz 



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776-9437 



14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon.. D«c«mb«r4, 1978 



Iran: troops press rioters; papers shut down 



TEHRAN, Iran (AP)— Imperial troops 
fired into the air and used tear gas in battles 
throughout Tehran with thousands of anti- 
shah demonstrators Sunday night. 

Power went out in many areas of the 
capital after the shooting started and the 
fighting continued in darkness. 

Power plant employees had warned they 
would cut off electricity if the shah's troops 
opened fire on protesters. 

There were no immediate reports of 
casualties. Large groups of demonstrators, 
many clad in white shrouds signifying their 
willingness to die, rallied in as many as 25 
locations in the capital, officials reported. 



They said at least 14 demonstrators have 
been killed in clashes since Friday night, but 
opposition sources claimed the toll was 
closer to 70. More than 250 persons have 
been arrested. 

BEFORE THE night-time demonstrations 
began, sporadic gunfire crackled across this 
nervous city following a night of rioting in 
which troops killed at least five protesters 
and wounded 20 others. A general strike 
called by Iran's exiled religious leader was 
faltering. 

Anti-shah protesters circulated through 
downtown Tehran Sunday tying up traffic 



HELP IN PREPARING FOR FINAL EXAMS 

HAS ARRIVED! 

The Counseling Center is offering two one-hour 
workshops on preparing for exams. 



Wed., Dec. 6 

3:30-4:30 p.m. 

KSU Union Rm. 205 



Thurs., Dec. 7 

10:30-11:30 o.m. 

KSU Union Rm. 205 



and taunting troops Soldiers firing into the 
air and swinging rifle butts chased them 
down streets and alleyways, injuring 
several. 

Officials of the city's martial-law 
government said the deaths occurred 
Saturday night when soldiers fired on a 
crowd that was leaving a mosque after the 9 
p.m. curfew. A nti -government slogans 
blaring from loudspeakers on the mosque's 
roof incited the crowd, which refused to 
disperse, the officials said. 

The crowd had been praying at services 
marking Moharram, the emotional 29-day 
Moslem mourning period which began 
Saturday. The opposition has called for 
stepped -up demonstrations and strikes to 
make the holy month a showdown period 
between Shah Mohammad Reza Palahvi 
and his foes. 

THE MILITARY government banned 



public religious processions during 
Moharram and said it would crack down 
"mercilessly'' on street disorders. 

The government hopes to keep the fervor 
of Moharram from turning into the kind of 
anti-shah riots that have killed a reported 
1,000 to 2,1)00 Iranians this year. 

Religious-inspired protesters oppose the 
shah's westernizing social reforms, which 
they say have corrupted Iran's traditional 
Moslem society. Leftists, students and other 
political dissidents have joined in the 
protests to demand a relaxation of the 
shah's autocratic rule. 

Moharram marks the martyrdom in 641 
Alt of Imam Hossein, grandson of the 
prophet Mohammed and founder of the 
Shiite Moslem sect, to which most Iranians, 
including the shah, adhere. 

The bazaar, the heart of Tehran's com- 
merical life, was closed as usual for the first 
lodavsn) Mohiirrnm. 



Twang 



Guitars for superstars 
have roots in Winfield 



By DEBBIE RHEIN 

Staff Writer 

John Denver, Keith and David Carradine 

and K -Staters Chris Biggs and Sarah 

Swaggerty have more in common than an 

interest in music. 

They own some of the 5,000 guitars made 



dOWnStOWtl b yTlmDowna 

f 6EE.TOO&AD tTS 1 



GEE,TOOftAO rrs 

SO CROWDED, MOM. 
I SURE! WISH 
"TOO COULD STAY, 




f HEY! NO ONE'S 

staying in the 

guestroom, 

chock. she on 

stay there. 



"SI 





r> 



EXCUSE ME, 
MRS. LAYUX I 
THINK CHOCK 
WANTS TO TEAR 

MY LONGS OUT. 



^ 




PEANUTS 



by Charles Shult* 



I'M WRITING A BOOK 

ABOUT BEETHOVEN 




THERE'S THIS 61RLWH0 
LIKES HIM, SEE, BUT HE 
HJONt PAV ANk' ATTENTION 
TOHER...SCWOUKN0UI 
WHAT SHE P0E5T6UES5! 
r"7- 





"'WHAT 90 YOU THINK 
OF THAT?' SHE SAID" 




Crossword By Eugene Sbeffer 



ACROSS 
1 Turkish 

regiment 
5 Iamb's sire 
8 Bristle 

12 Injure 

13 Whitney or 
Wallach 

14 Builder's 
need 

15 Silkworm 

16 Famous 
British earl 

18 Spanish city 

20 Important 
in tennis 

21 French 
summers 

23 Word with 
jacket or 
green 

24 Gear 
28 Kind of 

party 

31 Carpenter, 
for one 

32 An Asiatic 
people 

34 Edible tuber 

35 Naomi's 
chosen 
name 

37 Twists out 
of shape 



39 Before 

41 School 
orgs. 

42 Declare 
45 Russian 

unions 
49 Election 
zone 

51 Black 

52 Nautical 
word 

53 Philippine 
peasant 

54 Ibsen 
heroine 

55 Scepters 

56 Hockey 
star 

57 Profound 



DOWN 

1 Attention- 
getter 

2 ZMvago 
heroine 

3 Barren 

4 Turkish inn 

5 Blushed 

6 Boxing 
champ 

7 Courtesy 
title 

8 Shows 
mercy 

9 English 
lift 

10 Sometimes 
tall 

11 Cuckoos 



Average solution time: 


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12-4 
Answer to Saturday's puzzle, 



17 Corded 
fabric 

19 Medical 
suffix 

22 A "shin- 
plaster" 

24 Beaver 
structure 

25 Once - 
lifetime 

26 Accented 

27 Will-maker 

29 Behave 

30 Fuel 

33 Play the 

lead 
36 Mountain 

crests 
38 Belgian 

seaport 
40 Blunder 

42 Jewish 
month 

43 Farm 
building 

44 Josip Broz 

46 Central 
American 
tree 

47 Learning 

48 Break 
suddenly 

50 Elevator 
cage 




CRYPTOQUD* 1 2-4 

XYUF NUYV UO NVKAAIA JUA- 

JKUOA FKVI X K A A I A 

Saturday's Cryptoqulp - OUR REFINED TUTOR CANNOT 
CONDONE A PETTY PERFIDY. 

Today's Cryptoqulp clue: O equals N 



under the trademark of S. L. Mossm- 
man— expensive guitars which used to be 
manufactured by a company in Winfield. 

Only 5,0(»0 guitars will be made under that 
trademark, making them collector's items, 
because the factory shut down in August 
1977, partly due to conflicts with its 
distributing company, according to Stuarf 
Mossman, a stockholder in the guitar 
company who lent his name to the 
trademark. 

Although the factory has been sold to the 
Cripple Creek Dulcimer Company, a 
Colorado-based firm, Mossman said he 
bought back all the unfinished guitars left in 
the factory in order to complete and sell 
them. 

"There are about 100 that we will finish. 
We have about 50 left," Mossman said. 

THE GUITARS Mossman and his new 
partner Chris Fisher are finishing will be 
the last ones made under that tradmark, but 
Mossman said they will continue making 
custom-made guitars under a new 
trademark . 

The factory -made guitars ranged from 
$1,000 to $2,495 in price, although Mossman 
has built custom guitars for around $5,000, 
he said. 

According to Mossman, he and Fisher will 
be building custom guitars under a new 
trademark, to emphasize the difference 
between the factory -made ones and the new 
ones. 

"So there will be a distinct difference 
between what the factory made and what I 
and Chris Fisher will be making," Mossman 
said "We will retire the old trademark 
when we get through with these, which are 
the last that the factory worked on." 

Mossman said the last guitar will be 
exactly the 5,000th made by the factory, 
and he plans to make it a special guitar and 
auction it off in Guitar Player magazine, 
calling it "The Last of 5000" and announcing 
their new trademark at that time. 

"There are three things that make 
anything valuable," Mossman said, "You 
have to have a good design, good materials 
and the best workmanship." 

"I don't do anything radically different," 
he said. "It is just the happy combination of 
all these things.'' 

THE DESIGNS of the guitars are 
Mossman's own and he imports rosewood 
from India because it has a "ringing 
quality" Mossman said. 

"To anyone who didn't know, it has a kind 
of dull thud, but, to me, it rings," Mossman 
said. 

Since the factory shutdown, Mossman 
said he has been involved in several dif- 
ferent things. 

"The most fun thing I did was go make a 
movie with David Carradine," he said, "I 
was his roommate for five weeks and, let me 
tell you, it was a very interesing ex- 
perience." 

Although his acting part in the movie was 
"very small," Mossman said he enjoyed the 
experience tremendously. He is returning to 
guitar building, however. 

"It is a funny thing, the difference bet- 
ween machine and handmade things," he 
said. "People want a handmade guitar 
because it is the only one like it. But that is 
also true of machine-made guitars— every 
one is different." 

"It is more of a stigma than anything 
else," he said. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mori, December 4. Wf) 



15 



, k Hyatt to Carter: 
pardon Patty now 

NEW YORK (AP)-The president of the 
National Council of Christians and Jews has 
urged President Carter to pardon convicted 
bank robber Patricia Hearst. 

In a letter to the president released 
Saturday, David Hyatt called Hearst's 
imprisonment a "ghastly tragedy" and 
asked him to end her "agony and ordeal." 
Hearst, who has served an 18-month sen- 
tence to date, is eligible lor parole in July, 
Hyatt asked the president to grant Hearst 
immediate clemency. 



Collegian 
Classifieds 



One day: 20 words or less, $1.50, 5 cent* 
per word over 20; Two days: 20 word* or less, 
$2.00, 8 cents per word over 20; Three days: 
20 words or less, S2.25, 10 cents per word 
over 20; Four days: 20 words or less, $2.75, 13 
cents per word over 20; Five days: 20 words or 
less, $3.00, 15 cents per word over 20. 

Classllleds are payable In advance unless client has an 
established account with Student Publications 

Deadline Is 10 a.m. day before publication, to a.m. Friday 
tor Monday paper 

Items lound ON CAMPUS can be advertised FREE for a 
period not exceeding three days They can be placed at Ked- 
zie 103 or by calling 532-6555 

Display Classified Rate* 

One clay $2 75 per Inch: Three days: 12 60 par Inch; Five 
days: $2.50 per Inch; Ten days: (2.40 pet inch. (Deadline la 5 
p.m 2 days before publication ) 

Classified advertising Is available only 10 (hose who do not 
discriminate on the basis ol race, color, religion, national 
origin, sex or ancestry. 



FOR SALE 



MANHATTAN USED Furniture. 317 S. 4th. Come In and 
browse 776*112. (3-75) 

WE SELL Maranlz and Phillips Tech Electronic Warehouse, 
across Irom Vista Drive Inn on Tuttle Creek Blvd (2311) 

MOSSMAN GUITARS— due to factory shut down I have for a 
short time some very nice acoustic sleel siring guitars at 
less than hail original price. Call alter 5:00 p.m 318-221- 
2625 or 221 3968. Wlnlield, KS (52 71) 

GOODYEAR F60xl5 snow tires on Chrysler rims. 175 Model 
561 Remington 22 rifle with 4 x scope. $60. Call 776-4280 
(63*7) 

MUST SELL: Nice 12 x 60, two bedroom mobile home, par- 
tially furnished, fully carpeled, washer/dryer Possession 
lal ol year. 537 1558 Or 1 455-3401. ask tor Kslhy. (84-66) 

1989 EL Camlno pick up, full power, air conditioning, CB 
radio, air shocks. V 8, aulomallc, Micheltn steal belled 
tires. Excellent condition, extra clean. Phone 776-6436 (64- 
68) 

12x65 KIRKWOOD, 3 bedroom, (wo bath, new carpet and 
drapes, skirted, shed, lanced yard. Attar 6:00, 1-494.2735. 
164-66) 

HELPM I'M graduating and need lo sell my trailer home. 
Clean 10' x 55' comes completely lumlshed and ready lo 
move Into Cheaper than living In dorm or apartment Call 
776-5852 164-68) 

1973 FRONTIER 12 * 60 two bedroom mobile home Washer 
dryer, skirled, partially furnished 776 3058 (64-681 

1976 HOMETTE mobile home, 14x70. three bedrooms, com- 
pletely furnished, central air, skirted, tie downs Excellent 
condition Call 537 4086 alter 5:00 p.m. (65-69) 

GUNS. NEW selection Colt, Ruger, S&W, R.G., Llama, Ex- 
can, Luger. Titan. Winchester, others Excellent selection 
ol caliber Treasure Chest, Old Town (65-69) 

COINS MAKE ex eel lent gifts. Complete selection U.S. and 
Foreign Blrthyear and anniversary sals available. Treasure 
Chest. Old Town Mall- Aggievllle (65-76) 

CHESS SETS, hand carved, wooden and onyx. Also Chess 
tables and backgammon sals Ideal Christmas gltts. 
Treasure Chest. Aggievllle. (65-76) 

ANTIQUE JEWELRY and watches, nice selection of the 
classic old styles lor Christmas Old Town Mall and 
Aggievllle. (85-74) 

JUST PURCHASED 500 used science fiction paperbacks. 
Remarkable selection. Treasure Chesi, 1124 Moro, 
Aggievllle. Also have waaiams. romances, novels, detec- 
tives. (65*91 

TWO ALTEC Lansing 1207 A 5' column speakers, each with 4 
10" speakers. Call 532-571 1. (85* 7) 

1972 JAVELIN, power brakes, steering, excellent condition, 
sharp looking. Only $999. Call tor Lou al 539-5033. (86*9) 

SEARS 14,000 BTU sir conditioner Used Iwo summers, ex 
Calient condition. Only $100. Call 776*783 after 5:00 p.m. 
(65*9) 

1986 CHEVROLET Biscayna, 8 cylinders, air conditioner, 
everything In perfect condition. Best oiler over $350. Call 
776*783 after 5:00 p.m. (65*9) 



Pecans 

FOR SALE DEC. 7&8 

At Upper Research 

Greenhouse directly 

north of Dickens Hall 

from 7: 30 a.m. to 

5:30p.m. 

By Horticulture 
Club 

All pre-cracked-in 

multiples of 5 lb. bags 

only$U0/lb. 



STEREO SYSTEM In excellent condition. Realistic STA-648 
stereo receiver, two Realislic electros 1st 2a speakers, 
Sony TC 270 reel to reel stereo tape recorder with 
speakers, all this for only $400. Call 776*783 after 5:00 
p.m. (65*91 

snark, mach ii sailboat 85 square fool sail Phone 537- 

0827. (86*8) 

1S74 CHEYENNE 374 Ion air, power steering, power brakes. 
AM-FM stereo, cruise control 454, one owner 537-0154 af- 
ter T:00 p.m (66*7) 

TYPEWRITER SMC 2200, three years old 778*301.(68*8) 

OAK ROCKER, oak swivel desk chair, oak library table, hall 
tree, oak dresser, pie cupboard and chest 776-9705 after 
5:00 pm (67-71) 

STUDDED SNOW tires. New, III 13 Inch wheels. 539 4126 al 
ter 5:00 p.m. (67*9) 



Lucille's-Westloop 



20% OFF 



AND MORE ON 



EVERYTHING 



IN OUR STORE 
UNTIL DEC. 25 



1977 BELLA Vista trailer house, two bedroom, furnished, 
skirted, shed. Just like new and in excellent location. 537 
9503 (87-71) 

MOBILE HOME. 12x80. two bedroom, lots ol living space, 
built-in dressers, skirted and lied down. Nice lot 537-7198 
(87-71) 

"MARBLE CHESS Sat". Bowling ball, mechanical nut 
cracker 50 gal. iron pot with stand Telephone 776-5050. 
(67*8) 



FOR BENT 

TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electrics and manuals: day, ... 
or month. Buzzells, 51 1 Leavenworth, across from post of- 
fice. Call 776-9489. (Itf) 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS: Excellent selection. Hull Business 
Machines, 1212 Moro, 539-7931. Service most makes ol 
ty pewrlte rs . Also Vic tor a nd Ol ivett i adders. (1 61 1) 

SANTA SUITS Reserve yours now Treasure Chest 
Aggievllle. (43-78) 

LARGE TWO bedroom apartment with two sleeping lofts, 
$270, bills paid, al 1016 Osage. 5374233. (57-71) 

ONE AND three bedroom apartment, three blocks to cam- 
pus, fully carpeted, laundry facilities $125 and $250 plus 
utilities 315 Deni son. 776-4960. (61*7) 

LARGE REDECORATED, furnished one bedroom duplex. 
Country setting, close In. $185. No pets. 778*848. (63*7) 

ONE BEDROOM furnished basement apartment. Pels 
welcome Between Aggie and downtown. Available Jan. 1. 
Call 539-7128 (63*7) 

LARGE ONE bedroom furnished apartment at 221 N. Juliette. 
Water, trash, and heal paid, $180 per month. 778-3866 or 1- 
456-9614 (64-78) 

ONE OR two bedroom furnished apartment one block from 
campus, all utilities paid, available now. 776*010, 7:00 a.m. 
to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. (64*7) 

THROUGH MAY, lumlshed two bedroom apartment. Dish 
washer, air conditioned. Available January t. Close to cam- 
pus. Call 537-7268 after 5:30 p.m (87 71 ) 

NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

APARTMENTS 

1&2RR 

furnished & unfurnished 

from $165 

• FREji; shuttle service to 

KSU 

portion of utilities paid 
adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

PHONE 






539-2951 

or see at 
1413 Cambridge Place 



MUST SELL 1972 mobile home 12x70. with pello and shed 
Call 539-1639 after 5:00 p.m. or anytime on weekends. (67- 
71) 



AVAILABLE J AN i —One bedroom furnished apartment, car- 
peted. Sl55Mionth Call 778*274 after 8:00p.m. (6448) 

COZY ONE bedroom basemen I apartment. One block Irom 
campus Available January 1st. $130 a month. Call 776- 
3007 alter 5:00 pm (64*8) 

SPRING SEMESTER, large, warm, one bedroom apartment 
lor one, two or three persons. Two blocks Irom campus. 
Laundry facilities (utilities appro* $8fmon1h). $155 539- 
7047,(85-71) 

UNFURNISHED HOUSE In Fostorla, $120 Call evenings and 
weekends. 1-457-3494.(85*7) 

DUPLEX, FURNISHED. Mont Blue apartments. One block 
Irom campus All conveniences, available for second 
semester. 537*058. (85*9) 

UNIVERSITY PARK, lumlshed house. Three bedrooms 
Modem. Call 539-4182. (85*9) 

STILL AVAILABLE, first person backed out. Trailer, close to 
campus, must be student. Please try again, 776-5892. (85 
67) 



SMALL, ONE bedroom apartment, shower, near campus. 
$11 5 and electricity 537* 141 alter 5:00 pm (65*9) 

PLUSH, TWO bedroom furnished apartment, cameled, cen- 
tral air, laundry dishwasher balcony, near campus, 
Aggievllle, January. $260. 776*800 after 5:00 p.m. (86-70) 

NOW AVAILABLE newly carpeted Iwo bedroom house, Call 
532-3121 or 537-1289 Ask for Terry. (66-70) 

TWO BEDROOM basement apartment, lumlshed 
Washer/dryer hook up $100 plus KPL, al 1822 Hunting, one 
half block from KSU. 539*401 . (66*0) 

LARGE FURNISHED apartment al 1016 Osage, bedrooms 
and sleeping tolls, good lor 3-4 people. $250, bills paid 
537-4233. (66-95) 



WILDCAT INN 

2nd Semester 

Seniors Graduating 

Make Limited Availability 

For 2nd Semester 

Occupancy 

Call 

CELESTE 

for Information 

539-5001 



FURNISHED BEDROOMS, kitchen and laundry lacllllles. 
free parking and walk to KSU. $55 and up, bills paid 537 
4233 (68-95) 

ONE BEDROOM furnished basement apartment with private 
anlrance. Call 778-3582. (67*8) 



SUBLEASE 

THROUGH MAY. furnished two bedroom, dishwasher, air 
conditioned. Close to campus. Available now. 776-5189 
(63*7) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 



FEMALES TO share exceptional house at KSU, furnished. 

private bedrooms, $65 and up, washer and dryer, no pels. 

al 809 N 1 1 1h. 539*401 . (57*6) 

r 
TWO FOR great house two blocks from campus. Own 

bedroom, Iwo baths, basement, garage, pels, $70fmonth 

plus 1/3 utilities Free cable and HBO 776*204.(64*81 ' 

QUIET, NONSMOKING male 10 share one bedroom fur 
nished apartment for spring semester $94lmonth plus 1/2 
Utilities 539-5932. (64*6) 

CHRISTIAN FEMALE desires same lo share large, Sunny 
apartment. Two blocks from campus. Laundry facilities. 
$75 month. Call Lynn, 539-7047. (65-71) 

FEMALE, SPRING semester. Nice second Moor apartment. 
Near campus. Own bedroom. Oil street parking $75. After 
5:00 p.m.. 539-7059. (85*7) 

JANUARY FIRST Female to share one bedroom apartment 
near campus and Aggie Furnished $86 month, washer and 
dryer. Call 776-1813 (65*7) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester Private bedroom, laundry 
Four blocks from campus $75 per month plus one fourth 
utilities. Call 776-3*44. (65*9) 

FEMALE NEEDED lor spring semester lo share furnished 
three bedroom apartment. Large private room $95 
Utilities paid. Call Catherine, 539*444. (85*9) 

RESPONSIBLE MALE to share two bedroom mobile home 
$60 month plus one half utilities. Ask lor Don 532-5620. 
776^4920. (66*8) 

MALE TO share large house one block Irom KSU. Private 
bedroom, furnished. $70 at 1 108 Bluemont. 539*401 (86- 

m 

FEMALE TO share two bedroom furnished apartment close 
to campus. $100 month plus electricity. 776-0928 (88*8) 

LIBERAL MALE or female roommate for second semester. 
Two bedroom apartment one block from campus. $80 men 
th . 778-7308 after 4:00 p.m (66-70) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester, low bills, $100 month, private 
bedroom. 778-7368 after 4:00 p.m. (68-70) 

FEMALE WANTED to share luxurious large new two 
bedroom trailer house, convenient location. $80 plus one 
third utilities. 776-7610(68-701 

MALE TO sham nice basement apartment two blocks from 
Aggievllle and tour blocks from campus. Call Korby 778 
3064.(66-70) 

TWO FEMALES tor spring semester to share large four 
bedroom house. Private rooms tor $68 plus ont sixth 
utilities Call 537-0904 (67 71) 

NON-SMOKING female roommate needed tor Spring 
semester Share nice apartment with Iwo others. $87 50 
month plus one third utilities 778*81 1 . (67*9) 

NEEDED: TWO roommates for next semester Pels allowed. 
Cheap and close to campus. Call 776-3570 (87-76) 

FEMALE TO share large furnished apartment. Walk to cam- 
pus. $75 month. Utilities paid 539-2863. (67-76) 

LIBERAL MALE to share nice, completely furnished apart- 
ment for sprlno semester $90 month plus one third 
utilities Call Don 778*071. (67-71) 

MALE ROOMMATE wanted, two bedroom apartment, close 
to campus. $65 plus one third utilities. Call 539*175. keep 
trying, (87*9) 



HELP WANTED 



EXTRA HOURS earn you $500 per 1000 stuffing envelopes 
wllh our circulars. For Information SiS Enterprise, Oept. 
11, P.O. 1 158, Mlddletown, OH 45042. (53-77) 

OVERSEAS JOBS— Summer/lull lime. Europe. S. America, 
Australia. Asia, etc. All fields, $900-1200 monthly, ex- 
penses paid, sightseeing. Free info. Write: Internal lonal 
Job Center, Box 4490-KB. Berkeley, CA 94704(60-79) 

AGGIE STATION Is now taking applications lor waitresses 
w a iters . Apply In person, 1 1 1 5 M oro after 4 :00 p.m. (85-70) 

JANITOR-FULL lime, mostly days. Apply in person, office 
525. Ramada Inn (85*9) 

BURGER KING wants Individual lo work two nights during 
the week, 7:00 p.m. to ISO am One weekend night 
required 7:00 p.m to 3:00 a. m Sis rt $2 85 per hour. $3 after 
one month. Contact Mr. Wagner or Mr Nelson in person. 
(66-76) 



STUDENT WITH knowledge and background In swimming 
poofs and swimming pool maintenance. Pay $3 hour. 
Inquire al Natatotium office or call Karen at 532*390. (67- 



SERVICES 

RESUMES WRITTEN Irom scratch. $18 and up. Also general 
typing, writing, editing. Fast Action Resumes, 415 N. 3rd, 
537 7294 (86 76) 

STEREO REPAIR, over 500 replacement styles in slock. The 
Circuit Shop. 778-1221, 1204 Moro St. (8 78) 

THE OFFSET Press prints anything: resumes, brochures, let- 
terheads, posters, pamphlets, newspapers. Lei us do your 
next job. 317 Houston. 776-4889. (2211) 

ENGAGEMENT RINGS, wedding sets. Custom designing in 
gold and silver Jewelry repair including antique jewelry 
Custom Jewelers, 539-3225. 411 N. Third (55-74) 

CHRISTMAS PORTRAITS Pastel, charcoal and pencil 
likeness. Guaranteed. Prices from $S to $15. Live or from 
photo Call 776-3684 (80-78) 



SOUPENE 
COMPUTER 

WHEEL 
ALIGNMENT 

1 14 South 5th Phone 776-8054 



WILL DO typing (term papers, resumes, etc.) any type of 
material. Am experienced. Call 776*088 (65*9) 

IS YOUR Volkswagen hard to shift In cold weather? We can 
Install a transmission oil that makes your shifter easy to 
shirt and protects your transmission belter. Call J&L Bug 
Service for Information. 1 494 2388. (66 70) 

WOULD LIKE to have typing jobs, either big or small. 
Reasonable rales. Contact Debbie alter 5 00 or weekends 
at 537*922 (67*9) 



ATTENTION 

FREE MOTHER of Pearl or turquoise earrings *ith every $45 
purchase while supply lasts Buy al our sale prices 1(3 off 
all Inventory except gold and scrimshaw and receive your 
free pair. Men's chokers $10. Men's beautiful gold and 
silver hand made turquoise rings $46 Wooden inlayed belt 
buckles $9. Ladles' mother of pearl necklace $1Q. Rings $6 
Bracelets $6. Opal pendants only $21 We also have scenic 
picture Jasper, tiger eye, fire agates and malachite, all 1/3 
Oil Ladies Sterling silver chokers 112 off only $3 Stickpins 
$6 Over 300 pair assorted earrings $2 each Wlndtire 
Jewelry, 230 N 3rd. Open 1000 a.m. -5:30 p.m. Do your 
Christmas early! (62-78) 

ATTENTION LADIES: KSU football recruiting has started and 
we need you lor Kitten Krullers. Involves Saturday af 
lernoons hosting recruits tor lunch and tour of Manhattan 
If interested, call 532 5876 (65-71) 



Men's & Women's 
Hair Cuts 
$5 ALONE 

Lucille's— WestLoop 



THE FOLLOWING people have not picked up their 1978 
Royal Purples. Please come to Kedzie 103 and do so Lan- 
ce David Colla, Cynthia A Collins, Roberto Colons. James 
Colvin. Lawrence Combs. Clyde Connely, Brenl Alfred 
Cook, Lisa Anne Coon, Sheryl L. Copenhaver (66*8) 

GET READY KSU— it's West Hall week) Lot's "go lor it" you 
"wild and crazy" women ol West' (671 

WOMEN OF West: Hug a hug-buh member! Today is HBG 
awareness day ! (67) 



NOTICES 

MANHATTAN PAWN Shop, 317 S 4ih Slreet. 776 
61 12— stereos. 8- tracks, TV's, typewriters, guitars, 
cameras. Buy-sell -trade. (3-75) 

THE FOLLOWING people have not picked up their 1978 
Royal Purples Please come lo Kedzie 103 and do so. Lan 
ce David Colle, Cynthia A. Collins, Roberto Colon, James 
Colvin, Lawrence Combs, Clyde Connely, Brent Alfred 
Cook, Lisa Anne Coon, Sheryl L. Copenhaver. (88*8) 

WOULD YOU Hke lo sample some traditional international 
Christmas treats? (67) 



WANTED 

LARGE HOUSE to rent January second to tenth. Call 539- 
1264 evenings (63*7) 

MALE TWENTY plus lo share recently remodeled home on 
vatlier St. Must enjoy living In clean house and be willing 
to do his pari lo keep It clean. 539*208. (65*9) 



LOST 

BLUE BACKPACK In Derby Food Center including three 
books, important notebooks and calculator. Reward 902 
Haymaker Hall. 532 3670. [68-70) 



___ FOUND 

STUDENT RESERVED basketball ticket. Call to claim, 776- 
6685(65*7) 

SET OF keys on leather key chain, Call 539-2373 and ask for 
Robbl.(66*B| 

FEMALE GERMAN Shepherd pup. 12 weeks otd, at Manhat- 
tan and Thurston Ave. Please contact Animal Shelter 
before Dec. 11 (67-71) 



PERSONAL 

TRICIA, I'M the person who lost the billfold you found. Now 
I've lost your number, please call back— Val. (8748) 

TIMMY (MAC)-I heard they let Utile people go active, too. 
Congratulations! Big Sis. (87) 

SENIORS— DON'T torgel Fridays big TGIF party at Dark 
Horse Tavern. Dec. 8, 100 p,m.*:00p.m. (87-71) 

KSU MARCHING Band-Thanks for the great season this 
year. Our Banddaddy'a the Greatest! Watch the Baritone's 
become #1. Here we come London! Jeff. (87*6) 

HEY HIP Happy 20th birthday- Let's go prove that you arenl 
over the hill. You loving Phi Kap, Scott also. I'm only 10 
days behind you. Love you— Your Sis. Laura. (67) 

ROGER, CONGRATULATIONS, as II anyone had any doubts. 
Now II you can lust find a ]ob Keep running, Sherlock (87) 

"POOR SUE" McNeil. Happy 19th, gel runk, "We're see ya 

later" Love, your Roomies. (67) 



II 



KANSAS STATt COUEQIAN, Men., Dtombf 4, 1t7t 







!& 



Ifc 



v-^ 



REMAINDER BOOK SALE 

Special offering of llm books on your favorite subjects . . . Important savings on choice volumes including Art and Picture Boohs of unusual beauty and 
interest. Brand new original editions. A rare opportunity to purchase books at a traction ol their original prices. Limited quantities. Books at reduced prices and 
special Imports at bargain prices. 

This is Just a small listing at whet is on saw. 



CHILDREN S BOOKS 



MATURE 



CRAFTS & HOBBIES 



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163314 HEY OIOOLE DIDDLE AND OTHER FUNNY POEMS. With the 

Original R Caldecott Drawings Many in Full Color Wonderful rhymes 
with enchanting illus sure to please any child 

Only SI 71 

225204 Fliry Tale Pop-Up; THE BRAVE TIN SOLOIER. Six lull-color 
pop-ups with moving figures bring this wonderful children's tale right 
oil the pages Ages 3-8. 

Only SI. 41 
1852 1 IHintrtted by Arthur Backhaul THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRIST- 
MAS. By Clemen! C Moore. 21 Illus., < in Full Color A facsimile ot 
the first edition that recently sold lor J 3 00. here is this classic and ex- 
citing late as only Rack ham could have illustrated it 

Seetatlenil Value Only SI. M 
13S611 Faky Tab) Pep-Up: PUSS IN BOOTS. The class* children's 
tale illus. in lull color with "pop-up" moving figures. Ages 3-6. 7V< x 
10'A 

Spectacular Value Only SI 69 

COOKING 

251949 CREATIVE CAKE DECORATING. Illus Hundreds ol ideas lor 

making and decorating mouth-watering cakes lor all sorts ol festive 

occasions and simple, intimate ones Inci. Creole Chocolate Cake, 

Blueberry Manner Untied Netkms Cupcikes. Chrttinut-Tree Cake. 

more 

Pub at J9 95 Only $4. M 

119072 CAREFREE COOKING By J Remach 300 recipes and 55 
party platters lor easy living in summer house or city apartment 
Beked Spaghetti. Chicken Streganeff, Quick Apple-Mlnct PW, etc.. 
with recipes kids can cook, storing and freezing tips, more 
Pub all!) 95 Only $1.00 

107155 THE COMPLETE BREAD COOKBOOK. By T & J Kaufman 
Over 300 international recipes lor delicious breads, rolls, brioches, 
scones, muffins, popovers. biscuits, babkas, etc 

New, Improved ed.OfttySI.BS 




25932X THE QUICK AND EASY MICROWAVE OVEN COOKBOOK. By 

G Scnbner Complete guide lo this last, new, easy way ol cooking 
with hundreds ol step-by-step recipes inci Crab Fondue, Italian Veal 
Pkt, Indian Singer-Peer Pie, more 8 x 9V* 

Hew, complete ed. Only 12 98 

AMERICAN HISTORY 



036797 WHERE THE OLD WEST STAYED YOUNG. By John Rolfs 
Burroughs Illus with over 180 photos & maps A remarkable account 
ol the rise and tall ot the Range-Cattle business in Colorado and 
Wyoming with much about cattle barons, sheep and sheepmen, forest 
rangers, gold miners, range wars, long riders, paid killers and other 
characters SueB'/ixHW, 
Ong Pub at St 5 00 New, complete ed Only J7 98 

267039. IN AMERICA. By Errtsl Haas 105 Full Color Photos. Ex- 
traordinary collection of exquisile color pictures taken in America by 
one ol the world's greatest photographers. From land, water and sky 
he has provided unique glimpses of this vast country's natural 
phenomena, man-made creations and people M'/i x9M. 
Pud at 142 50 Only SB. SB 

259532 ATLAS OF WEAPONS AND WAR. By J Williams Over 140 
Photos. Illus . Maps and Diagrams. Most in Full Color Vividly 
describes how communities ranging Irom the lirst walled farming 
towns to modern super -powers have waged war. Examines the in- 
terplay between changing weaponry and changing tactics and 
straiegy throughout history BVr x 1 2 
Pub at$l295 Only $4.96 

244675 THE ADAMS CHRONICLES. By J Shepherd Nearly 150 
Illus and Phoios, Mosi in Full Color Adapted from the prize-winning 
television series, this is the fascinating text and picture history ol lour 
generations ol one ot America's most prominent families told in their 
own words from diaries and letters 
Pub at $17 SO Only 15.91 



261820 KATE GREENAWAY S LANGUAGE OF FLOWERS. 84 Full 
Color Illus New. large format ot this treasured vol., tilled with 
exquisite waiercolors by the renowned artist Lists over 700 Mowers 
and their secret meanings, such as Lilacs— the lirst emotions ol love 
Facsimile ot the 1 884 edition, which now sells for hundreds ot dollars 
7x10 

Special Value Only 12.98 
024667 A NATURAL HISTORY OF AMERICAN BIRDS. By E Howe 
Forbush & J. Bichard May % pages ot Illus. in Full Color by Louis 
Agassi z Fuertes, A. Brooks & Roger Tory Peterson A magnificent 
volume iltus. with the best set ol color plates in existence ot 18 North 
American species from Florida to Hudson Bay. all portrayed in full 
color A mammoth 8 x 1 1 '/i volume, over 600 pages of lite histories 
complete, accurate descriptions of the birds and their habits with an 
index of scientific and common names 
Ong. Pub atS22 .95 New, complete *d Only $12.91 

529203 WORLD GUIDE TO MAMMALS. By. N . Duplaix and N Simon 
Over 400 Range Maps and Full Color Illus Carefully rendered color 
illus and authoritative text present essential and unusual info on 81 2 
species ol common and interesting mammals Inci size, appearance, 
distribution, behavior, breeding habits, etc. 7W x 10Vi 
Pub. at $1 5.95 Only $6 98 




250519. BABY ANIMALS. By J Burton. Nearly 100 FuH Color Photos. 
Beautiful vol tilled with photos of all sorts of adorable, appealing baby 
animals. Big babies, small babies, water babies, wild babies, 
domesticated babies— they're all here. B x 10'.'; 

Extra Vakil Import Only SI.9S 

REFERENCE 

262800 DICTIONARY OF QUOTATIONS. Collected and Arranged with 
comments by Bergen Evans Over 2,000 pages containing thousands 
ol the world's familiar and unfamiliar quotations arranged by subject 
interest, an author index, and completely cross-referenced subject or 
key-word index with more than 2,000 historical and explanatory com- 
ments. 912 pages 

Ong Pub at 115 00 Only J4 91 

010771 DUNNIN8ERS COMPLETE ENCYCLOPEDIA DF MABIC. By 
Joseph Dunninger Hundreds ot line-drawings Thousands of tricks 
and illusions ranging from simple sleight-ol-hartd to complicated 
disappearance effects, secrets of many professional magicians inci 
Houdmi. etc Ail levels ol difficulty from beginner to expert fully ex- 
plained 

Ong Pub at $25 00 New. complete id. Only $6 98 

268558 EARTH, SEA AND SKY. Over 160 Photos. Illus and Maps. 
Most in Full Color. Stimulating introduction lo the intriguing sciences 
of geology, oceanography and astronomy. Inci earthquakes, 
Icebergs, birth ot the solar system, more. Ages 9 - 1 5 8Vi x 1 1 '/< . 
Pub at $5 95 Only 12.98 

SPORTS 

259494 THE RUNNING BOOK. By the Editors of Consumer Guide Ex- 
cellent guide lo a new, unique running titness program for people ol 
all ages. Built in adjustments tor individual characteristics, weight 
reduction, cholesterol- level reduction, more Inci evaluation of equip- 
ment available— shoes, clothing, stopwatches, etc 

Extraordinary Value Only $2.98 




262789 CARS OF The FIFTIES. By R Langworth and the Editors of 
Consumer Guide. 248 Illus Comprehensive, chronological review for 
all American car manufacturers of one ol the most innovative decades 
in automolive history Inci outstanding lealures and design trends 
such as the wrap-around windshield, two-tone colors, hard-top con 
vertables, tins, chrome, Edsel, Corvelte. more 

Extraordinary Value Only $2,98 
136948. THE LOVE OF SAILING. By Phillips- Birt 135 Full Color 
Photos Here is a sensationally photographed vol crammed with full 
color photos that captures the magic ot Cowes. the excitement ol the 
Syndey-Hobart I he glamour ol ocean racing, and the beauty ol the 
1976 TaN Ships B'/ixll 

Extra Value Import Only $5.98 



246619 WATCH A CLOCK ENCYCLOPEDIA. By deCarfe. Over 

1 ,400 Illus The most valuable reference book on clocks and watches 

Contains over 3.000 entries on every type of clock and watch and 

everything having to do with them. 

Orig Pub at $7 50 New, complete id. Only J3 98 

061601 FINE FURNITURE FOR THE AMATEUR CABINETMAKER. By 

A W Marlow 435 Illus Practical, superbly illustrated guide to the 

techniques lor producing professional looking pieces Irom small 

cigarette boxes to chests and tables, measured drawings, photos and 

step- by- step instructions 9W x 1 1 tt. 

Ong Pub 3111000 Haw complete ed Only 14 98 

528649 MAKE IT WITH MADEMOISELLE. By the Editors Ol 
Mademoiselle magazine 300 Illus., 24 Pages in Full Color. 245 
labulous cralt and design protects Irom the greatest collection ot 
design and fashion how-to ever put together Clear, easy-to-follow 
directions with "inside tips" Inci 21 ways to fan up a fee Shirt, 42 
Fantastic Scarf Tricks: Wallpapering with Sheets; more. 6'/> x 11. 
PubatS14 95 0nryJ4.9B 

ART ft ARCHITECTURE 



VllFI y - 



102080 MICHELANGELO THE PAINTER, By V Manani 121 Illus in- 
ci. 106 gorgeous Full Color plates Published under ihe auspices ol 
the Italian National Committee to Honor Michelangelo, this 
magnificent volume contains all of Michelangelo's art. from the 
designs, sketches and paintings to the great frescoes ot the Sistine 
Chapel. Deluxe binding of green cloth with simulated gold lettering 
10yixt4%.2'/!thlck. 
Pub at $75.00 Only $24.95 

L03817 NORMAN ROCKWELL ILLUSTRATOR. By Arthur L. Guptill. 
Preface by Dorothy Can field Fisher. 437 Illus, 43 in Full Color 
Beautiful, best- selling volume which shows the works ol America's 
most beloved artist and otters a pictorial panorama ol a growing and 
changing America Thirty years ol Saturday Evening Pest covers, hun- 
dreds ol anecdotes, all of Rockwell's most famous works and special 
illustrations done jusi for this book. 9x12. 
Pub. at S1 7.50 Only $7 98 

254220 TNE COMPLETE WORK OF RAPHAEL. Over 925 Illus . Inci 
49 Full Color plates Gorgeous vol fully explores the artwork ol this 
High Renaissance genius. Raphael achieved universal lame for his 
paintings, drawings and architecture Eight of Italy's leading scholars 
examine his artwork— his intense use ot color, his extraordinary sub- 
reel matter, his astounding influence on later artists— along with a 
thorough discussion ot his tile. Accompanying the text are hundreds 
ot iltus., many in lull color, making this study the most complete one 
on Raphael in the English language 732 pages 1 1 x Wfy. 
Ong Pub at $60 00 New. complete ed. Only $29 95 




258625 THE ART OF WALT DISNEY: From Mickey Mouse lo Ihe 
Migic Kingdoms. By C Finch 251 Illus , 170 in Full Color Lavish 
presentation ot sketches, drawings, phoios, as well as an 
authoritative text traces the entire history ol the Disney studio From 
Ihe i ii si Mickey Mouse cartoon through animated features such as 
Snow White and Fantasia to live action features like Mary Pepsins, 
culminating in the elaborate fantasies of Disneyland and Wall Disney 
World. 9x11'/:. 
Pub. al $15 95 Only 13 98 

LITERATURE, FICTION* POETRY 

263114 WORKS OF CHARLES DICKENS. 70 Illus Collection ol his 
best novels Great Expectittoni, The Pickwick Papers, Oliver Twist, A 
Chrtstmai Carol, David CoppertleM, Tata ol Twa Chios. Enhanced with 
beautiful illus. by George Cruikshank, EG Dalziel. H French "Phiz" 
and others Handsomely bound in simulated leather and gold 1126 
pages 

Extraordinary Value Only 14 98 
268493 Sherlock Helmet: THE WEST END HORROR. By Nicholas 
Meyer, author ol Toe Seven- Per- Cent Solution, Another "posthumous 
memoir" of John H Watson, M.D Fabulous, fascinating fun. 
Pub at $7.95 Only It 98 



I* 



P* 











Open from 9:00-9:00 Mon.-Sat. 
Sundays Dec. 3, 10, 17-1:00-5:00 




i 



A 




KANSAS STATS HJS1 M 50CIETI 

TOPtKA, KS 6661k! EXCtl 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Tuesday 

Decembers, 1978 

Kansas State University 

Manhattan, Kansas 

Vol. 85, No. 68 



Nobody told Acker 

Confusion shrouds renovation costs 



By PAUL RHODES 

Editor 

and BRUCE BUCHANAN 

Collegian Reporter 

K-State President Duane Acker told an 
Associated Press reporter two weeks ago he 
had been advised that labor costs for the 
renovation of his suite of offices in Anderson 
Hall should about equal the cost of materials 
for the project. Acker's information was 
wrong. 

As early as Aug. 18. Gene Cross, associate 
vice president for University Facilities, 
knew the labor costs were more than $21,000 
over material costs for the project. This 
information was not presented to the 
president, according to Cross. 

A memorandum dated Aug. 18, sent to 
Cross by Jim Shepard, acting assistant vice 
president of University Planning, outlined 
that $55,tM4.51 had been spent on labor 
through Aug. 16 and $34,237.11 on materials 
for the project through Aug. 15. Shepard 
received the information from Doug Elcock, 
an accountant for University Facilities. 

Acker was not informed of the difference, 
Cross said, because the project was not 
completed and the labor figures in the 
memorandum could have been misleading. 

"The labor costs were top dynamic a 
figure at that lime," he said. "We gave him 
the material cost, but not the labor because 
we didn't have what we felt was a good 
figure on the labor. 

♦'We felt the material figure was a good 
figure. 

DESPITE THE day-to-day tabulation of 
costs on the project by University Facilities 



accountants. Cross said Acker was just 
informed on the progress of the renovation 
and not the figures involved. 

When the president asked for cost figures 
in August, he was told the amount for 
materials but was not informed of the labor 
costs, Cross said. 

Cross said Monday that at no time until 
the completion of the renovation project 
were exact labor figures available, because 
"there was still more labor to be com- 
pleted." 

Cost records for the project, however, 
were kept as a running total by University 
Facilities accountants, and could have been 
checked at any time, Elcock said. 



"There would only have been a couple 
days lag before the labor figures were 
recorded,'' Elcock said. Lag time for 
recording materials was between five to 
eight days from the time they were pur- 
chased, he said. 

LABOR FOR the renovation project, 
started nearly a year ago, was done by 
University employees. The employees fill 
out daily time slips, identifying by job 
number the project they worked on and the 
hours Ihey worked on the project that day. 

These figures are then recorded by 
University Facilities accountants according 
to that number, including the amount the 



project was charged for that work 

The original estimate of the cost of the 
renovation was not available Monday, but 
Shepard said whatever the figure was, it 
was just an estimate. He said the cost on an 
estimate of that nature could vary as much 
as 20 to 25 percent. 

Acker said he couldn't remember the 
amount of the estimate, but that it was less 
than the final $99,648.38. 

Cross said he was not concerned with the 
final cost (compared to the estimate) of the 
project because by the time he took over on 
July 1, the job was close to completion. 

"My principle concern was to get the job 
(See RENOVATION, p. 3> 



nsi 



ide~ 



BIGGER CUTS may be in store for K 
State athletics due to NCAA probation. 
Seepage 7... 

FORMER KU COACH Don Fam 

brough will return to the Jayhawk 
football line-up, again as head coach. 

Details, page 8... 




RENOVATION REASONING. Gene Cross (left) 
discusses the renovation of K-State President Duane 



Stall pfioto by Pete Sows 

Acker's office with Collegian reporters late Monday 
afternoon while Acker looks on. 




Ounce of prevention 



Warning . i aC king from Lafene? 



By JULIE DOLL 
Staff Writer 

Last Wednesday, Lisa Sandmeyer, senior in journalism 
and mass communication (JMC), went to Lafene Student 
Health Center complaining of nervousness and insomnia. 
At 4: 16 p.m. she was called into Dr. John Watkin's office; 
seven minutes later she left the building with a 
prescription of Valium . 

"Valium may be the most prescribed drug in the U.S.," 
Robert Sinclair, director of the Lafene, said, "Before 
them (Valium*, people somehow faced these problems 
without drugs." 

But now, Valium- along with other tranquilizers and 
barbiturates- are being used by many people to help 
them cope. 

"We have people coming in all the time trying to milk us 
for these (tranquilizers)," Dr. Steven Mosier, Manhattan, 
said, "They're a very popular drug." 

But Valium and similar drugs are not only popular, they 
are potentially dangerous, said Dr. Edward Walascek, 
chairman of the University of Kansas Medical Center 
pharmocology department. Patients can suffer addiction 
with prolonged use, Walascek said, and mixing Valium 
and similar drugs with other drugs can cause significant 
problems 

VALIUM IS used to treat tension and anxiety resulting 
from stressful situations, Larry Davison, pharmacy 
supervisor at Providence-St. Margaret's Hospital in 
Kansas City, Kan., said. 

"Valium is a relatively safe drug for short-term use in 
smnll dosages." Sinclair said. But. patients do need to be 



warned against driving, operating machinery or taking 
other drugs while taking Valium, he said. 

"They (Valium) do potentiate (increase the effect of) 
other drugs," Sinclair said. 

"I received no warning of any kind," Sandmeyer said. 
"No one said I shouldn't take them if I've had alcohol or 
that they are potentially addicting," she said. 

"Valium is a very safe drug," Walascek said. "But, 
there is one serious danger; if you mix it (Valium) with 
alcohol, you're in trouble." 

Walascek agreed with Sinclair about cautioning 
patients of the effects of Valium, and added that 
marijuana and beer also act with Valium, sometimes with 
fatal consequences. 

SANDMEYER, a Collegian staff member, was given six 
5-milligram tablets of Valium. Eight other Collegian staff 
members, all JMC majors, went to Lafene complaining of 
nervousness, stress and resulting aches. One other staff 
member, sophomore Bruce Buchanan, went to Lafene 
complaining of depression. Nine of the 10 persons 
returned with prescriptions. 

None of the nine persons who received prescriptions for 
Valium, Dalmane, Librium, Elavil, Darvocet and 
Fiorina) were warned that the drugs could be fatal if 
mixed with other drugs, and none were fully examined. 

Doctors at Lafene see 30 to 40 patients a day, Sinclair 
sa id . Laf ene is open rrom 8 to U : 30 a.m , and 1 to 4 ; 30 p. m . , 
leaving about 10 minutes for the doctor to examine a 
patient 

Buchanan saw Dr. Daniel Martin, who prescribed the 
(See TRANQUILIZERS, p. 10) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, To*,, DaewntMr 5, 1S7S 



Iran's anti-shah oil workers plug production 



TEHRAN, Iran (AP)— Thousands of oil 
workers, again spearheading the anti-shah 
movement, launched a new round of work 
slowdowns Monday hoping to topple Shah 
Mohammad Reza Pahlavi by drying up 
Iran's all-important oil revenues, reliable 
sources reported. 

In Tehran, three days of massive and 
Moody anti-government protests appeared 
to be winding down Monday. But in a new 
twist to what has been a one-sided struggle 
by unarmed dissidents against the 



Campus 
Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENT! 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL has scheduled the final oral 
defense of (he doctoral dissertation of William Seeker for 
4730 p. m. today in Ward I JS. 

ASME CHRISTMAS BANQUET Is Friday, tickets are 
available in Seaton 108. 

CONCERT JAZZ ENSEMBLE will hold a concert at 10730 
a.m. Wednesday in the Union, 

FRUIT CAKES are now on lala In Shellenberoar 201. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS will nave a book sale In the 
EE library today and Wednesday 11 a.m. 3 p.m. 

PRELAW ADVISING OFFICE will present Oppor 
unities in Law at Southern Methodist University School of 
Law 2* p.m. today in Union JOS. 

PHI ALPHA TNETA will be selling Unicet Christmas 
cards in me Union Wednesday and Thursday 10 a.m. 1 p.m. 

TODAY 

BLACK STUDENT UNION Will meet in Union 70* at S p.m. 

CHIMES will meet at the Douglas Center at 6730 p.m. 

PHI ALPHA THBTA will meet In Elsenhower 1 27 at 7 p. m. 

SOCIETY OF ETHNIC MINORITY ENGINEERS Will 

meet in Seaton 117 at •?» p m 

PEP COORDINATING COUNCIL will not meet 

CLOTHING AND RETAILING INTEREST GROUP will 
meet in Justin 249 at 4730p.m. 

LI VIMS GROUP ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet in the 
Union Little Theater *t 7 p.m. 

AG mech CLUB will meet in Seaton 23s at 1 p.m 

PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY Will meat In Ackert 116 at 7 
BJK 

•AKERY SCIENCE CLUB wilt meet In Shellenoerger 
Conference Room at I7J0 p.m. 

AUK will meal In the Union Bio-I Room at 7 p.m 

LITTLE SISTERS OF THE STAR AND LAMP will matt at 

the Phi Kappa Phi House at 9 p.m, 

FCD will meal in Justin's lounge at A p.m.; bring IT and 
canoed lead 

SPURS will have a Christmas parly al ttie International 
Student Center et 4 730 p. m. 

SHE DUS will meet at the Delta Upsiloo House atmo p.m. 

CROP PROTECTION CLUB Will meet In Art XXI03 at 7 

p.m. 

WEDNESDAY 

OERMAN TABLE will meet In Union Stateroom I at 1J7J0 
p.m. 

GO CLUB will meet in Union 20* 7 10 p.m. 

STUDENTS FOR HANDICAPPED CONCERNS will meet 
in Union 709 atl p.m. 

ECON CLUB will meet In Waters 16 at 7 p,m. 

TRANSFER STUDENT TASK FORCE Will meet In 
FairthildTQl at « p.m 




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DRINK SPECIALS GOOD 
1 1:30 A.M. CLOSING! 



military's guns, an urban guerrilla band 
attacked a police station, killing one officer 
and wounding another. 

Youthful protesters also set fire to a bank 
in the heart of the city, causing considerable 
damage. But otherwise the armored 
military patrols stationed at key points in 
the city seemed generally in control. 

THE GOVERNMENT reported its troops 
killed 17 persons and wounded 50 in Tehran 
and the southern city of Isfahan since the 
latest violence exploded Friday night. But 
diplomatic sources put the death toll at 
more than 30 here and in provincial cities, 
and some of the shah's opponents claim as 
many as 3,000 persons have been killed, a 
figure most observers believe to be wildly 
exaggerated. 

"We're fighting to the death now. We have 
shed too much blood to stop," one militant 
who identified himself only as Hassan told a 
reporter at the burial of a half-dozen slain 
protesters in a Tehran cemetery. 

"The shah is the enemy of the people and 



of Islam," he said. "We will kill all who 
support him." 

The opposition is both religious and 
political— orthodox Moslems who want to 
reverse the shah's Westernization of this 
traditional Islamic society, and political 
dissidents who want to end his authoritarian 
rule. 

SOURCES SAID the new slowdown by 
many of the 37,000-man work force in Iran's 



southwestern Khuzestan oil fields im- 
mediately cut Iran's daily oil production by 
2 million barrels, one-third of the normal 
level. 

Sources in the oil fields said the refinery at 
Abadan on the Persian Gulf was not affected 
by the slowdown Monday but probably 
would be Tuesday, along with at least two of 
four offshore fields in the gulf. 





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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tue., Decembers, 1978 



Briefly 



By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 



Aides reveal Jones 9 embassy ties 

JONESTOWN, Guyana— Senior aides of suicide cult leader Jim 
Jones maintained much closer relationships with American Em- 
bassy consular officials in Georgetown, Guyana, than has so far 
been officially admitted, according to Jones' personal papers. 

One U.S. official promised to find out "discreetly" who within the 
embassy was spreading rumors questioning Jones' religious 
beliefs. 

The cult aides also vehemently demanded advance lists of 
Jonestown residents whose relatives had asked the embassy to 
investigate. The embassy complied. 

The personal papers from Jonestown acquired by The Associated 
Press make it clear that the intention of getting the names in ad- 
vance was to fully brief the subjects before the American officials 
arrived at Jonestown. 

The U.S. State Department has said that in 75 interviews by 
consular officials with Peoples Temple members in Jonestown, no 
evidence was uncovered of repression or of people wanting to leave 
the community., 

Trial in London— it's got it ail 

LONDON— It's a courtroom drama with a bit of everything— the 
charges involve sex, politics, a murder plot and blackmail. 

The principal defendant, Jeremy Thorpe, could hardly be more 
unlikely. Former leader of the Liberal Party, he is the embodiment 
of England's patrician class, a man educated at Eton and Oxford, a 
barrister, a privy councillor to the queen. 

Yet Thorpe, 49, faces a charge of conspiring to murder a 
discarded homosexual partner, ex-male model Norman Scott. 

The result, in the language of Britain's racy tabloids, is "the case 
of the century." 

There hasn't been a scandal like it since War Minister John 
Profumo resigned in 1963 after disclosures that he shared a 
mistress— Christine Keeler— with the naval attache at the Soviet 
embassy. 

Its lurid sexual allegations rival the infamous Oscar Wilde court 
action of 1895 which resulted in the Irish writer serving two years in 
jail for homosexual offenses. 

* 'Frisco gets first woman mayor 

SAN FRANCISCO— City Supervisor Dianne Feinstein, who 
tearfully announced the assassination of Mayor George Moscone 
and Supervisor Harvey Milk last week, was named Monday to 
replace Moscone and become San Francisco's first woman mayor. 

One of her first duties will be to appoint three city supervisors- 
one to replace herself, one to replace Milk and one to replace former 
Supervisor Dan White, who recently resigned and has been charged 
with the shootings of Moscone and Milk. 

Feinstein, 45, is the ninth woman in the country to run a city with a 
population over 100,000. Only women mayors in San Antonio and 
Phoenix have larger constituencies. 

Her selection to the $55,596-a year position— she won votes from 
seven of the eight other members of the Board of Supervisors— was 
virtually guaranteed Sunday when Supervisor Robert Gonzales, 
who had announced an interest in the mayor's job, withdrew and 
threw his support to her. 

Congressman's plane crashes 

ANCHORAGE, Alaska— Senate Minority Whip Ted Stevens (R- 
Alaska) was seriously hurt and his wife, Ann, reportedly was killed 
Monday when the private plane they were in crashed at Anchorage 
International Airport. 

Stevens was listed in serious but stable condition at Providence 
Hospital here, according to nursing supervisor Yvonne Cairns. She 
said Stevens was "alert and awake." 

Witnesses at the scene said Mrs. Stevens was killed. 

Carlin: a united farm voice 

TOPEKA -Declaring he believes he has the background to be an 
effective spokesman for Kansas agriculture, Gov. -elect John Carlin 
told the Kansas Farm Bureau Monday he plans to take a leadership 
role in espousing the farmers' cause in Washington. 

"I certainly feel I have the background to understand those 
issues," Carlin told the 60th annual meeting of the state's biggest 
farm organization. 

"I feel a responsibility as your governor to provide leadership ..." 
Carlin said. "I think we need to work to make our influence more 
successful (in Washington). 



Weatfier 



Renovation cost confusion 
swirls through Anderson 



(continued from p. 1) 

done in the most efficient and economic way 
possible," Cross said. "What I had to do was 
finish up the last 10 percent. I had nocontrol 
over what was done before 1 took over." 

BEFORE CROSS officially took office 
July 1, the administrative supervisor for the 
project was Paul Young, then vice president 
for University development. 

Project coordinator for the renovation 
work was originally Vincent Cool, then 
assistant vice president of University 
Planning. Cool left the University Aug. 4 to 
take a temporary position as director of 
state architecture in Topeka, at which time 
Shepard took over as project coordinator. 

Original cost estimates of the renovation 
project were made by the planning 
department while Cool still headed the 
department. Acker said. 



Shepard said Monday he did not know if 
Cool's records contained the original cost 
estimates because he has not examined 
them. Cool may return to the University in 
February, Shepard said, so he began bis 
own files on the project when he took over 
Cool's position. 

On Nov. 27, Cross released what he said 
were the final costs of the project. Total cost 
for labor was $63,555.99 and materials were 
$36,092.39, according to his figures. 

Shepard said Monday, though, that there 
were still a few small things left to do in the 
suite of offices. 

Don't be 
fuelish. 

Off ICE Of tNISCV CONSERVATION 
Of IMt HDEHAl tNEICV OFUCE 



A warming trend continues today as highs reach the upper 40s to 
lower 50s. There will be increasing cloudiness tonight with lows in 
the upper teens to lower 20s. 




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Opinions 



Examine priorities 

A referendum raising about $2.5 million in student fees for the 
construction of an all-purpose fieldhouse at K-State will be voted on 
by Student Senate Thursday night, and if passed, students will have 
an opportunity to approve or defeat the fieldhouse proposal during 
spring elections. Student senators and other students should be 
wary of approving the proposal for several reasons. 

The referendum calls for an increase in student fees in the fall of 
1981. There is a fundamental problem here with regard to taxing a 
group of people without their consent. If the students of 1981 and 
beyond are going to pay for a new fieldhouse, those students, not the 
students in 1979, should decide if and how their money is to be spent. 
Although they can vote to void the referendum, they shouldn't have 
such a proposal hanging over their heads without prior approval. 

The proposal relies on alumni, private, and state and city 
government contributions to get the ball rolling on building a new 
facility. Since the complex is mainly for student use, it is the student 
body and not outside forces which should make the first move and 
start collecting money through student fees. Money in the bank is 
more likely to enhance outside contributions, and if student fees are 
to be raised for a fieldhouse, waiting two years for the inevitable 
increase only prolongs the ribbon-cutting of a new facility. 

Spending money for a sports facility instead of for academic 
needs isn't in keeping with the educational goals of a university. 
There are many academic areas, especially the University library 
system, where $2.5 million can be readily used. While it isn't the 
responsibility of the student body to pay the upkeep on academics, it 
is obvious that no one else is going to. 

Students need to decide for themselves about the referendum and 
where their priorities lie at K-State, and they need to examine the 
problems the referendum will solve versus the ones it is likely to 
bring. 

DOUGLASS DANIEL 
Editorial Editor 



Letters 



Who is lying 
about Iran? 



Editor, 

Since a large majority of the letters in this 
paper have been anti-Shah and anti-Carter, 
I thought I'd raise a couple of points for the 
other side— just to make things interesting. 

First of all, I've been amazed at all the 
pleas of the Iranian students at K-State 
slating that their movement is strictly 
religious, and that the Shah and Western 
sources have been spreading "lies" con- 
cerning a communist movement. 

Being a transfer student from a smaller 
college in Oklahoma for the past two years, 
and having made friends with a number of 
Iranians there, 1 was informed that, yes, 
once having overthrown the Shah, Iran 
would become a communist nation. These 
were not spies of the Shah, but ordinary 
Iranian students. So who's lying? Is it really 
the Shah"' 

Dickey worth 
his salt 

Editor. 

Re: "Up Your Optimism." 

It is said that actions speak stronger than 
words. Although people may make remarks 
which are pessimistic in tone, their actions 
are often the opposite. How about the person 
who tells you that he's going to flunk a test 
and then studies for il as hard as he can? He 
obviously believes there is a chance to 
salvage something. His actions show he is 
basically optimistic. Optimism is not words, 
it is an attitude. 

As an example of an optimist worth his 
salt (whieh Mr. Daniel said couldn't be 
found), I suggest K-Si ale's football coach, 
Jim Dickey. Although he may not always 
say optimistic things about the football 
program, he still believes it will be suc- 
cessful. If Daniel doesn't believe Coach 
Dickey is worth his salt, he is free to argue 
with the 15.IKKI other people at (his. univer- 
sity. 

Scant lipsham 
junior in pre*vel 



I could never understand why the U.S. was 
educating these students while monetarily 
supporting the Shah (or why the Shah 
allowed them to come to the U.S. in the first 
place), and I still can't. 

Second, the plea, "Iran: The Next Viet- 
nam", seems slightly ridiculous to me 
considering how sick the American people 
were concerning the Vietnam conflict. The 
government does a lot of things that don't 
make much y^nse, but I hardly feel that we 
will get involved with another Vietnam. 

In Vietnam, our mistake was that we 
didn't fight to win. If put in a similar 
situation in Iran, I don't think we'll make the 
same mistake again. 

Ken Murphey 
junior in civil engineering 

Definitions 
confused 

Editor, 

Re: "Up Your Optimism " 

I think, Mr. Daniel, that you have your 
definitions confused. An optimist is one who 
sees a problem, believes that it can be 
solved, and works to accomplish this goal. 

A pessimist is «one who, to use your own 
words, "is always looking for the muck at 
the bottom of the pond because he realizes 
there will always be muck in his way." A 
person who looks at the world through rose- 
colored glasses is simply naive. 

Martin Luther King, Jr. did not strike me 
as a pessimist. He was a man who had a 
dream, a man who believed problems could 
be solved, a man who worked to overcome 
these problems because he had a dream. 
This man was an oplimist. 

The time has come. Mr. Daniel, for you to 
stop looking for the muck in the world and 
start looking at the world as il really is, 
optimistically 

Sandra Mi eel 
sophomore in special education 




We or en 9 t buying 



This may seem an innocuous subject. It is, 
nonetheless, an irritating one. Women's 
shoes. That's right, those marvelous things 
you put on your feet every morning that are 
supposedly designed to protect your toes, 
heels and soles from the elements. Well 
folks, not any more. 

The latest "fashion" in women's dress 
shoes are little dainty things with no heels 



Ka y Coles 



and no toes. That's right, sandals for winter. 
Of course, if you are wearing jeans or 
slacks, you have your choice of homely 
shoes with ties or expensive boots. 

If you want a dress shoe, sandals are your 
only choice. Now, I think sandals are fine for 
summer, but in winter? You've got to be 
kidding. 

These dainty delights offer no protection 
and the heels are slim and high, just right 
for falling flat on your face. But hey, they 
are fashionable. 

Our marvelous magnates of fashion have 
deemed that women want to appear more 
feminine, primmer and more proper. And 
what could be sexier or more alluring than a 
pair of delicate shoes requiring the ex- 



tension of the leg in such a manner to make 
it appear shaplier? 

Well boys, I've got news for you. These 
shoes you have so carefully thrust upon us 
will not be purchased, except of course, 
during the summer months when sandals 
are appropriate. Who in her right mind is 
going to traipse around in the snow wearing 
such dainty do-nothings? 

This is another prime example of the 
power fashion merchandisers believe they 
have over women consumers. It seems they 
believe no matter what they thrust upon us, 
we will buy, buy, buy. Every woman's 
dream is to be the ideal fashion plate, no 
matter the discomfort or the expense. The 
man who believes that should look for his 
head in an appropriate place. 

Women are not toys, nor are they stupid. 
Offering no alternative to those high-heeled 
monstrosities simply means women won't 
be buying as many shoes this year. 

So, think about that during the next '%. 
fashion season. When your sales fall down, * 
it's because your product isn't needed, isn't 
wanted and in this case, is just plain im- 
practical. 

So, don't bother making those $30 shoes 
which look as though they contain $5 worth 
of leather. We just aren't buying. 



As the dust settles 



Another election has come and 
gone— finally! 

In the wake of this year's election, the 
reactions of many political candidates have 
been ignored, so a little post-election 
analysis is in order. 

Governor Robert Bennett, attempting to 
look at the bright side of his defeat to dairy 
farmer John Carlin, said today he was 



Todd Sherlock 



thinking of marketing his book, How to Lose 
With a Winning Campaign in Fifteen Days 
or Less. The book has an appropriate 
preface by Martha Keys and ends fittingly 
with philosophical poetry by Bennett's wife, 
Olivia. 

Meanwhile, Governor-elect Carlin is still 
in shock and has not convinced himself that 
he. in fact, actually won the close election. 
When contacted at his Smolan residence, 
Carlin peered up from his milking stool and 
rattled off one of his many "concede defeat" 
speeches written by his staff. After all, they 
had nothing else to do during the seemingly 
hopeless campaign. 

"Well, we gave it a hell of a try," Carlin 
said. "But I don't worry— I have the best of 
faith in Kansans and I know we will do well 
with the leadership of Bob Bennett for 
another four years. ' ' 

So, fear not, Bob. You may be governor 
after all— by means of default. 

Other winners in this year's election are 
also just as confused. Jim Jeffries, for 
example, is so excited about going to 
Washington he has already purchased a 
home in Seattle. 

It is reported that Jeffries' family has 
some reservations about moving to 
Washington. When asked if he has a solution 
to make his family more receptive to the 
idea, Jeffries replied, "I'll tempt I hem with 
a £.1 percent lax cut. That idea seems to 
work all the time.'' 



On the senate side of the race, Nancy 
Landon Kassebaum managed to easily 
defeat the Harold Stassen of the Kansas 
Democratic party, Dr. Bill Roy. Kassebaum 
credited her success to her unusual display 
of naivele which drew her statewide at- 
tention. 

She said she was also prepared to handle 
the toughest of issues that could arise in the 
campaign, including abortion. 

Curt Schneider, although he lost his bid for 
re-election to the attorney general's seat, is 
relieved at the outcome of the election. He 
will no longer have to worry about the press 
snooping into his kinky habits with state 
cars, out-of-state motels and the like. 

Looking back on the election, the can- 
didates are probably still as confused about 
the results as the rest of us may be. It seems 
as though everyone who was supposed to 
win lost and vice-versa. 

But the time for rehashing and 
reminiscing is now over. Serious work needs 
to be done in this state and in Washington. I 
wish our newly -elected officials the best of 
luck and to those defeated, well, hang in 
there. 



Kansas /-_.|| __:'"""""" 

sue Collegian 

Tuesday, December 5, 1978 

THE COLLEGIAN It published by Sluilpni 
Publications, Inc . Kinin State University, daily 
except Saturday. Sundays, holidays and vacation 
periods 

OFFICES are in the north wing ol Kedite Hall, phone 
531 *S5S 

SECOND CLASS postage paid at Manhattan. Kanui 
MUi 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: US, one calendar year, 
ST SO, one semester 

THE COLLEGIAN (unctions in n legally autonomous 
relationship with the University and >s written and 
edited by students serving the university community 

* Paul Rhodes, Editor • 

Terry Brungardt, Advertising Manager 






Benefits plus tight loan policies 
spell stress for student veterans 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Ti».,Dtctmh«r5,1«78 



By KAREN CARLSON 
Collegian Reporter 

Student veterans at K-Statc are finding 
themselves between a rock and a hard place 
in trying to finance their education through 
velerans' benefits. 

According to Larry Moeder, coordinator 
lor veteran affairs al K-State, the Veterans 
Administration has started a new program 
railed Operation Boost to encourage 
veterans to take advantage of their benefits. 
Itut at the same time the VA is making it 
(hi ficult to obtain educational loans due to a 
high loan default rale. 

'It goes in one big circle. First they want 
them to come to college, then they prac- 
tically run them out by making loans hard to 
obtain," Moeder said. "The VA gets a good 
program and then doesn't handle it well at 

all." 

Congress passed a VA Education Loan 
program in 1974 to provide money for 
veterans wishing to further their education 
where the cost oi education is high. The VA 
managed the program poorly resulting in a 
50 percent default rate on paying back loans, 
he said. Moeder said he believes K State 
reflect* the national average. 

According to Moeder, for the first three 
years the VA loaned money too freely; 
veterans would go lo school for a semester, 

New parks head 
to start Jan. 15 

Manhattan City Commissioners have 
named a new superintendant of parks 
replacing Jim Manning, who resigned 
earlier this year, 

Marvin Cullison, former park superin- 
tendant of Muscatine, Iowa, will officially 
take the position Jan. 15. 

According to Bruce McCallum, 
Manhattan's director of services, 
Muscatine's park system is comparable to 
the one in Manhattan. 

For example, McCallum said, the acreage 
of Muscatine's parks is approximately the 
same as Manhattan's. The city also has a 
zoo comparable in size and number of 
animals as Manhattan, he said. 

"Because of the similarity of the park 
systems, Cullison's background fits in very 
nicely to our needs," McCallum said. 

Prior to his work experience in Muscatine, 
Cullison worked with the engineering crew 
with the DuPage County Forestry Preserve 
District at Lombard, III. 

McCallum said Cullison's duties as park 
superintendant will include four major 
areas: Manhattan's parks, the city's 
forestry operations. Sunset Zoo and the 
city's cemetaries. 



drop out and still receive loan money for the 
entire year. They also would loan money to 
veterans who had overpayments existing al 
the time of the loan, he said. 

"CONGRESS overreacted to the default 
rate. Although it is high, they are making it 
very difficult to obtain a loan," Moeder said. 

In May of last year, the VA revised the 
regulations for veterans requesting loans 
under pressure from Congress, Moeder 
said. Now they only give out loans one 
semester at a time and will not make loans 
to veterans with existing overpayments, he 
said. Moeder said he believes these 
revisions are fair and worthwhile. 

**A veteran applying for the loan may no 
longer claim expenses that the VA considers 
non-educational," Moeder said. He said this 
includes claims for living expenses for 
dependents, debts, car payments, car in- 
surance, car repairs, life insurance, home 
improvements and dependent's tuition (if 
any). 

The restrictions of such claims limits the 
married veteran lo few benefits while at- 
tending school, Moeder said. At K -State, 70 
percent of the veterans are married, he 
said. 

The VA loan will only cover those ex- 
penses which the school determines an 
average student should receive, Moeder 
said. 

But, "the veteran is not an average 
student. A majority of them are married 
and seem to be discriminated against if the 
veteran tries to get an education," Moeder 
said. 

"If the veteran does get a loan that in- 
cludes living expenses it's only for the cost 
ol living in a dorm," he said. "Out of ap- 
proximately 1.000 veterans attending K 
State, about a half a dozen live in a dorm." 






West Loop 
Shopping Center 

539-6001 



Industrial recruitment, 
tourists on city agenda 



Manhattan city commissioners Tuesday 
night will consider a contract with the 
Chamber of Commerce to provide industrial 
recruitment services for 1979, 

According to Manhattan City Manager 
Don Harmon, similar agreements have been 
entered into in the past, but the chamber's 
budget for this activity needs to be approved 
by the city commission. 

Commissioners will also consider ap- 
proving a contract with the chamber of 
commerce to provide convention and 
tourism activities within the city. 

Under this agreement the city would 
transfer all monies it receives through 
Transient Guest Act to the chamber for this 
purpose, Harmon said. 

Commissioners will also hear a report 
from city staff members on the status of 
low-and moderate-income housing projects 
forthecity. 



According lo Bruce McCallum, 
Manhattan's director of services, 
developers working on these projects must 
develop the land and then turn the 
properties over to the city for rental to the 
public. 

City commissioners will also authorize 
city staff members to negotiate the disposal 
of any undesirable and unneeded real estate 
owned by the city. 



BULLOCK, PRICE 
& YOUNG P.A. OPTOMETRIST 

Dr. Bullock, 404 Humboldt 

776-944S1 

Dr. Price It Dr. Young 

1 1 19 Westloop Center 

537-1118 

winner un * omm rraence 



m 



LET'S TALK ABOUT... 

TURMOIL IN IRAN 

with 
Dr. Burton Kaufman 

KSU Dept. of History 



12:30 P.M. 
Wed., Dec. 6 

K-STATE UNION 
CATSKELLER 




msl002 



mk^teu 



.MP»on 




I 



4 






m 



The Souths Gonna Do It Again! 

iCESAUEI 

with special guest appearance by 

Billy Spears & The Billy Spears Band 




?'■■ 





Thursday December 7, 1978 

9:00 EM. 
Hoch Auditorium 

Lawrence, Ks. 

$6. and $7. / $5,50 and $6.50 for Students (before Dec. 1) 



Tickets available at the SUA Box Office. 
Also at Kief's, Capers in K C The Record Store in Manhattan, 
Liberty Sound in St Joseph. Mother Earth in Topeka, 
Tiger's, and David's in Emporia. 









KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tim.. DMembor 5, 1978 



Future federal and state guidelines 
to regulate K-State power plant 



K-State will be required to meet federal 
and state regulations for its proposed power 
plant, but the regulations can not be set until 
the plant size has been determined. 

Raymond Buergin, chief of the Air- 
Engineering and Enforcement Section, 
Division of Environment, Bureau of Air 
Quality and Occupational Health of the 
Kansas Department of Health and 
Environment, discussed the Kansas Air 
Pollution Emission Control Regulations and 
the State Air Quality Control Act with the 
Manhattan Environmental Board Monday 
night. 

The discussion was in relation to the 
development of a power plant for K-State. 

Buergin said that all he knew about the 
proposed plant was what he had read in the 
Topeka Daily Capital. 

"This is my first contact with K-State," 
Buergin said. 

According to Buergin, K-State must 
contact him 60 days before construction is 
initiated. Buergin defined construction as 
the initial pouring of cement for the foun- 
dation. 

"We have the authority to not allow them 
to begin if it fails to meet our standards," he 
said. 



K-STATE HAS several alternatives open, 
Buergin said. 

He said natural gas was not available to 
K-State, but fuel oil, although expensive and 
limited in supply was available. 

Other alternatives for the power plant 
include the use of coal and contacting 
Kansas Power and Light for service, he 
said. 

The use of coal raises the question of 
pollution and the amount of particulate 
matter in the air, he said. 

Particulate matter is defined as the 
amount of dust and other particles in the air. 

Buergin said as far as particulate matter 
was concerned, Kansas falls into a category 
which only allows a 20 percent increase in 
particulate in the air. 

We have some particulate matter in the 
air in Kansas but most of it is natural wind- 
blown dust, he said. 

"I think we have some clean coal-burning 
plants in Kansas," Buergin said. 

"Once the plant is operational we will 
require a report quarterly on how the plant 
is continuing to comply with regulations," 
Buergin said. A physical inspection is made 
annually and checks are done more often if a 
problem is suspected, he said. 





HAPPY BIRTHDAY 

STEVE!! 

WE LIKE YOUR 
BIRTHDAY SUIT. 

HAVE A HAPPY 21st 
from all of us. 

J.C., A.M., A.K., L.K., D.L.M., 
D.M., L.C., V.S., C.S., S.S., K.D. 



WANT INSTANT 
RESPONSIBILITY? 



^ 




^ 



Being o missile launch officer in the Air Force is on awesome respon 
sibility But its an exciting job with leadership opportunity Irom the 
word "go" 

Air Force ROTC can help you prepare tor mis exciting field by grant- 
ing two, three or .four-year scholarships These will poy for tuition, 
books, ond lob fees, and give you $100 o month for some of your other 
college expenses 

Then, il you can qualify lor the missile field, you con work on an ad- 
vanced degree through special graduate education programs, ond the 
Air Force will help with the expenses 

It you re the type who s looking for on exciting future, a future of com- 
mitment ond pride, look into this one See it you qualify to be an Air 
Force missile launch officer and help perpetuate the traditions that 
have made Our country greal 

Get the details right away You'll be glod you did. 
For more information, contact 
Major Grenier, Military Science Bldg.. 
Room low, or call him at (9H) 532-6600 



^ra^ra^ 



ROTC 

Gotewoy to o great way of life. 



k> 



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1 



you say you don't 
know what to give... 




give-a-book ! 

•for Birthday 
•for Christmas 
•for Any Occasion 

The give-a~book certificate is a new promotion 
offered through the KrState Union bookstore 
in cooperation with the American Booksellers 
Association and the National Association of 
College Stores. 

These certificates are redeemable for books at 
face value at any one of over 700 participating 
bookstores nationwide. 

Its the perfect gift ! 




k-state union 

bookstore 




0301 



Two-thirds of the pie 
better than nothing 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Ttw., Ptcwnbf 5,1978 



By JIM GIBBONS 
Sports Editor 

Four Big 8 teams are on their way to bowl 
games this season, which means more 
money for the other four teams in the 
conference. But for K-State, it could mean 
an even bigger cut in funds. 

"It's tough for me to guess (how much 
revenue we'll get from the bowls)," K-State 
Athletic Director DeLoss Dodds said. "We 
just don't know yet." 

The money from the bowl games, after 
expenses, is divided into eight equal por- 



Sports 



lions and distributed to the Big 8 schools. 
But since K-State is on probation and has 
been penalized one-third of its conference 
revenues, it stands to lose a great deal of 
money. 

As an estimate, if the money from the 
bowls is $3.2 million and it is split eight 
ways, each school would receive $400,000. 
But K-State would get two-thirds of that 
figure or $266,666. That means K-State 
would be penalized $133,333. 

"It appears that the Big 8 revenues are 
going to be up," Dodds said. "But we'll have 
to wail and see how the post-season 
basketball tourney does before we know. 
That could net us $25,000 depending on which 
teams are in it. 

"Besides the bowls, we've had a lot of Big 

'Cats to battle Gophers 

Jack Hartman's Wildcats host Minnesota 
i ranked I9th by UP1 ) in Ahearn Field House 
tonight at 7:30. K -State's junior varsity will 
play Dodge City Junior College before the 
varsity contest. 

Head Coach Jim Dutcher led the Golden 
Gophers to a 17-10 mark last season but lost 
five lettermen and three starters to 
graduation, including all-American Mychal 
Thompson and his 22.1 point average. 

Kevin McHale, a 6-11, 230-pound forward 
who scored 13. 1 points a game last season 
should be Minnesota's big gun. He scored 14 
points and pulled down 10 rebounds against 
Nebraska last week. Also returning is 6-4 
junior guard James Jackson, who averaged 
10.7 points last season. 

Brian Federson (6-10 and 3.2 points per 
game) will start at center with Trent Tucker 
(6-5) at forward and Leo Rautins (6-7) at 
guard. 



8 teams on TV this season, which raises 
revenues. All that would make our one-third 
cut even bigger." 

WHERE DOES the extra money go? 

"They (the Big 8) haven't decided yet. 
They should decide in March at the Big 8 
meetings," Dodds said. "They could either 
divide the money up between the other 
schools or use it for general office funds. 

"It (the one-third cut) was a topic of 
discussion at the Big 8 meetings in 
December and possibly they could make an 
announcement in March." 

K-State receives two checks a year from 
the Big 8, one early in the year and another 
in June. The check in June will contain the 
money from the bowl games and from the 
basketball tourneys. 

Dodds said that a new Big 8 rule could 
affect K-State in the future. Beginning next 
year, there will be a $175,000 maximum on 
gate receipts to a visiting Big 8 team. 

CURRENTLY, conference schools split 
the gate 50-50, after officials are paid, with 
no limit. Officials receive $250 for football 
games and $135 for basketball games plus 
traveling expenses. 

"1 want to emphasize that no one in the 
conference is paying that much now 
($175,000)," Dodds said. "The rule was 
passed so that if schools like Nebraska and 
Oklahoma expand their stadiums, they 
won't pay out more than $175,000. " 

Under the rule, both the host and visiting 
teams split an $8 ticket 50-50. If the ticket is 
sold for more than $8, the host team pockets 
the rest of the money, supposedly for 
stadium expansion or improvement. 

However, the school doesn't have to use 
the money for expansion. In basketball, in 
order to charge a subsidy they would have to 
get permission from the Big 8. In football 
there is no longer any such restriction. 

Dodds said he believes the Big 8 "has the 
most truly balanced financial sharing of any 
conference in the nation." 

HE CITED the Big 10 as an example. 
Each school there is required to guarantee 
the visiting school a minimum of $100,000. 
which can put a burden on the smaller 
schools in the conference, 

"If we had to pay that kind of a minimum, 
it would really be tough on us," Dodds said. 
"We're just tickled to death to be in the 
situation we are (with the Big 8)." 



Jamaica 




MAY 19-26 
„$349 



_uuijri 



ln-cooe«l: Jan. rock, country 
blue* and pop. Today s myilc 
I by today * arott*. 




"5th Anniversary Special" with Host 
Harry Chapin 




8:00 Sat., Dec. 9 

CHANNEL 11 cs© 

PRODUCED FOR fUBUC TEiEVlSJO* BY WiTW/CMCACO 



■FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES' 

Interested persons are invited to share in beginning a new 
F.C.A. Chapter. 

On Friday, December 8, 1978 at 6:30 p.m. an F.C.A. supper at 
The First Presbyterian Church, 8th & Leavenworth. 
For reservation please call 537-0518. 



The word is out! ^7 

or©®? IMS" 

is coming 

December 8 &9 8pm. 

$2.00 at the door 
union catskeller 

I k-state union 

Jupc coffeehous* 



LISTEN TO THE GAME 

TONIGHT-9:30 p.m. (tape delay) 

THE WOMEN WILDCATS 

vs. 

THE NEBRASKA C0RNHUSKERS 

...on KSDB-FM 88.1 

"THE VOICE OF THE WOMEN WILDCATS" 



What our veterinarian/ 

know oboul animal/ 

ho/ helped a lot of people 

In the Air Force, Veterinary Officers are 
vital members of our Medical Service 
team. For example, their duties include 
preventive medicine for potential trouble 
areas in public health. They apply the prin- 
ciples of veterinary and biomedical sci- 
ence to implement preventive measures. 
They're the experts looked to for guid- 
ance and assistance in breaking the chain 
of infection from animal to man. In return, 
the Air Force rewards them with benefits 
and satisfactions that are difficult to match 
anywhere. 

Become one of our Veterinary Officers. 
Contact your local Air Force recruiter for 
information. 



Capt. Donald Towner 
Citadel Bldg.— Suite 417 

1734 E. 63rd St. 
Kansas City, Mo. 64110 

(816) 926-5424 Collect 



Air Force. A great way of life. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tu«„ D«c«mb.r 5, 1878 



Fambrough to return 



LAWRENCE <AP>— Don Fambrough, 
who four years ago was forced out as 
Kansas coach, said early today that he was 
given a four-year contract to return as the 
head of the Jay hawk foot ha li program. 

Fambrough coached KU to a 19-25-1 
record and one bowl appearance from 1971- 
74. Ironically, it was Bud Moore, dismissed 
Nov. 16, who replaced Fambrough at the 
Jayhawk helm when Fambrough resigned 
after the 1974 season. 

Fambrough, it was announced Monday, 
was the top choice of Athletic Director Bob 
Marcum and Chancellor Archie Dykes to 
succeed Moore. Marcum and Dykes were 
expected to make the announcement this 
morning, but Fambrough leaked word of the 
contract at 12:30 a.m. today. 

Lawrence Daily World Sports Editor 
Chuck Woodling said Monday Kansas 
alumni are apparently divided on the 
selection of Fambrough. 

The newspaper said assistant coach John 
Had), 38, who had campaigned for the head 
job, will probably join Fambrough as of- 



Rose stays in National League 



KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP)-Ewing 
Kauffman, who started a pharmaceutical 
empire by bottling pills in his basement, has 
had more than a few doors slammed in his 
face. 

But when that happens, says the owner of 
the Kansas City Royals, you just move on to 
the next house. 

"We'll be back next year, trying even 
harder," Kauffman declared Monday after 
the Royals' pursuit of free agent Pete Rose 
ended in defeat. 

Rose, who played out his option with the 
Cincinnati Reds, said he was rejecting the 
Royals' offer— reported to be near $3 million 
for five years with an option year— to 
remain in the National League. 

"The reason was he wanted to set those 
records in the National League," said 
Kauffman, whose offer was reportedly more 
than any National League team's. "They 
were too important to him." 
The Royals tried to counter Rose's am- 

K-State women 
play Nebraska 

The K-State women's basketball team 
returns to the road tonight to play Nebraska 
in Lincoln, 

K-State wilt try to even its record for the 
season. The Wildcats are currently 2-3 after 
splitting a road trip to Texas over the 
weekend. 

Expected to start for K-State are Beth 
Boggs at center, Laurie Miller and Eileen 
Feeney at forwards and Tami Johnson and 
Gayla Williams at guards. LeAnn Wilcox, a 
junior guard, Margo Jones, a senior center, 
and Kim Price, a freshman forward, should 
also see action. 

Game time is set for 7:30. K-State's next 
game is Dec. 12 against Missouri in Ahearn 
Field House. 



bit ion to surpass Stan Musials National 
League record of 3,630 career hits by of- 
fering him a chance, as a designated hitter 
in the American League, to chase Ty Cobb's 
major league mark of 4,191 hits 

"He said he wanted to go where he had 
some friends and stay in the National 
League to go after Musial's record. He 
didn't say (who he would sign with) but I 
presume it'll be Philadelphia because he has 
friends there, " Kauffman said. 

It was the second such disappointment 
suffered recently by the Royals, who have 
not signed a major free agent since the 
market opened up three years ago. 

This reluctance sparked criticism from 
Royals players after Kansas City lost its 
third straight American League playoff to 
the New York Yankees in October, and 
Kauffman and General Manager Joe Burke 
apparently resolved to be more aggressive 
this time. 



ATTENTION 

VETERANS and 
DEPENDENTS 

STOP BY THE 

OFFICE OF VETERANS' 

AFFAIRS TO COMPLETE 

YOUR SPRING 

ENROLLMENT 

INFORMATION FORM 



>M/> 



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XXXXXXXXK5CL 



HOME OF THE K-STATE BUMM-fflON 

EVER/ TUESDAY EVENING 

TWO FER NIGHT 

1 far I On Any Bmmp (bmpt CwHM 
TttMtiO 50* Afatefei wttfi tab* U>. 



WIN A TRIP FOR 2 TO STEAMBOAT. 5 DRAWINGS 
EVERY WEDNESDAY (STARTING AT 8:») FINAL 
DEC. 13. BE A WINNER THIS WEDNESDAY NIGHT IN 
STEAMBOAT DRAWING. 



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fensive coordinator, although that an- 
nouncement may not come until later in the 
week. 

Fambrough and Hadl were described as 
close personal friends. 

They were among four candidates 
scheduled to be interviewed by Marcum and 
his advisory search committee Monday 
afternoon. 

The other two, according to the Journal 
World, were Mike White, San Francisco 
49ers offensive line coach and former 
California head coach, and John Cooper, a 
former Kansas assistant who just signed a 
new three-year contract as Tulsa head 
coach. But neither had appeared by mid- 
afternoon. 

The Journal World said Fambrough ap- 
parently emerged as the leading candidate 
last week and that the only roadblock to his 
quick selection has been some alumni 
discord, principally from the Wichita area. 

A KU spokesman said Fambrough was 
asked by Marcum two weeks ago to consider 
applying for the job. 




'■■■WAV 

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Wed. 



Si:!: 1 * • 



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•w.v. •«•■■• -■-■ 



-•_•_• 




FREE FILMS 



♦:i 

vvv.v.v 




News Parade 1941 
!%%%■ Dec. 6 Marx Brothers Festival l\\\ 



«■: 



.W.V. 

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10:30-11:30-12:30 
Little Theatre 



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k-state union 

upc feature films 



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iff (71 k-state union 

LWJ upc issues & ideas 



BADLANDS 

STARRING 

MARTIN SHEEN 

AND 

SISSY SPACER 

7 P.M. WED., 

Dec. 6 
K-State Union 
Little Theatre 

Admission $ 1 



and the College of Architecture and 
Design Dept. of PDP 

1 002 VSR 




SOUTHERN DINNER 

Bhiemont Room 11:30 am- 1 pm 
December 5, 1978 

featuring: Fried Chicken 

Barbecued Beef 



Complete Buffet 
S250 

SALADS RS» RJVIE 

vtGamg man g mg. 

BREAD CESSER, 
SVRAGE 



Salad Buffet 

SL75 

*XRQOCEOF 

SALADS JBJ94 PLATE 

BREAD 

BEVBJAGS 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tu.. ( 0.cemb.r5, 1978 





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ROBERTBOYD 



Staff prtolo by Nancy Zoglemsn 



Congressional staffer advocates 
tighter budget in coming years 



By KELLY SWOFFORD 
Collegian Reporter 

The U.S. Congressional Budget for the 
next two years must be significantly tighter 
than the budgets of the last three years, said 
Robert Boyd, minority staff director for the 
U.S. Senate Budget Committee. 

Boyd was speaker at a seminar Monday in 
Waters Hall sponsored by the K-State ec- 
nonomics and political science depart- 
ments. He is the staff director for Sen. 
Henry Bellman (R-Okla.), a position he has 
held since the budget committee was for- 
med in 1975. 

"It's incredible that an organization with 
control of hundreds of billions of dollars had 
no way of predetermining totals; no 
mechanism for discussing priorities and no 
trade-offs," Boyd said of the Congress 
before 1974. 

"There was no single entity on Capitol Hill 
responsible for looking at the total spen- 
ding," he said. 

IN 1974, things began to change. The new 
Congressional budget process went into 
effect late that year. 

This new budget process includes the 
budget committee which is the first 
organization that works year-round on the 
budget. 

The process of establishing the budget 
begins in October of the previous fiscal year, 
Boyd said, and continues throughout the 
year, ending^by Oct. 1, the first day of the 
new fiscal year. 



It begins with three months on long-range 
analysis of the next fiscal year's spending 
options, Boyd said. By the third week in 
January, the President of the United States 
submits his version of the budget. 

The Senate and the House of Represen- 
tatives budget committees then spend 
February and March gathering background 
information. By March 15, all other Senate 
committees submit their budget requests, 
he said. 

The Senate budget committee makes their 
budget resolution. This resolution goes 
before the Senate, resulting in the Senate 
Budget Resolution, according to Boyd. 

THE CONGRESS as a whole then debates 
the Senate Resolution and the House 
resolution and establishes one resolution. 

This budget resolution is given to the 
Appropriation Committee by May 15, he 
said, where each budget request is analyzed 
and either approved or disapproved. 

With checks on the economy throughout 
the summer, and possible revisions made, 
the process continues until Sept. 15 when the 
final Congressional budget is completed. 

Since the committees introduction four 
years ago, the Congress has been able to 
stay within the budget outline, Boyd said. 

"We are in the late stages of a fairly long 
economic recovery," Boyd said. 
"Something must be going right with fiscal 
policy in the last three or four years, and I'd 
like to believe the budget process played a 
fairly significant role." 



Bio one r! 







Students Entertaining Students 

rnsMimg 

SALLY SHUTLER & LYNNE KIRIAKOS 

Easy listening & Comedy 

TODAY! 12:00-1:00 p.m. 

K-Stoto anion CatskeUer 



FOLKSINGER, GUITARIST 

JOHN IMS 
in concert 
Pec. ft & 9 in the Catskelier 






HELP IN PREPARING FOR FINAL EXAMS 

HAS ARRIVED! 

The Counseling Center is offering two one-hour 
workshops on preparing for exams. 



Wed., Dec. 6 

3:30-4:30 p.m. 

KSU Union Rm. 205 



Thurs., Dec. 7 

10:30-1 1:30 a.m. 

KSU Union Rm. 205 




It's a 

TGIF PARTY 

Friday, Dec. 8, 1-6 p.m. 

Dork Horse Tavern 



HEY SENIORS 

Shirts and Activity Cards still on 
Sale at Hollis House 



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FOR SALE DEC. 7 & 8 

At Upper Research Greenhouses 
Directly North of Dickens Hall 
from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

By HORTICULTURE CLUB 

All pre-cracked-ln 
multiples of 5 lb. bags only 

>1.30/lb. 

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Proudly Presents 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tue. December 5. 1978 



'They're a very popular drug' 



Tranquilizers commonly prescribed for stress 



(continued from p. 1 ) 
anti-depressant Elavil after Buchanan 
complained of headaches and fatigue. There 
was no physical examination, Buchanan 
said. 

"Elavil should never be prescribed, ex- 
cept to people who are under psychiatrist's 
care," Walascek said. Elavil counters the 
effects of depression, he said, but the 
depression returns when the patient stops 
taking the drug. 

"Martin said it would take three months 
for the Elavil to really help," Buchanan 
said, "and, if I just stopped taking it, the 
depression would return." 

Dr. Stephen Phillips prescribed 30, 5- 
miligram tablets of Valium for Paul 
Rhodes, junior, after he told Phillips that he 
was suffering from "tense muscles, 
headaches and insomnia, possibly caused by 
stress." 

"A quick examination of my neck was 
performed, checking for tight muscles," 
Rhodes said. "From this and my discussion 
with Phillips, he prescribed Valium which 
were to be taken once at midday and one or 
two before I went to bed. Phillips told me 
that the pills were viewed as dangerous by 
some doctors and that I shouldn't leave 
them setting out where roommates or 
friends could get a hold of them. He said 
nothing about taking them with alcohol." 

Another staff member, junior Debbie 
Rhein, was given 28, 10-milligram tablets of 
Librium by Dr. Donald McCoy. 

"1 told him I had not slept since 8 a.m. the 
day before 1 went to see him," Rhein said. "I 
said I had been having headaches and 



couldn't sleep too well. He asked me if I had 
any history of sleeplessness; I told him I 
had. 

"Except for looking at my hands (for a 
rash) and the nurse taking my blood 
pressure, I wasn't examined," she said. 

Rhein said she was not cautioned about 
mixing the drug with alcohol or that 
habitual use can cause addiction. 

LIBRIUM IS similar to Valium, Walascek 
said. A 10-milligram dose of Librium is 
almost identical to a 5-milligram dose of 
Valium, he said. 

Both Librium and Valium are potentially 
addicting, Walascek said, but only if 
patients take large dosages over a long 
period of time, he said. 

Between 75 and 100 milligrams per day 
over a three- or four-week period would 
result in withdrawal symptoms when the 
patient stopped using the drug, Walascek 
said; but, the dosage and time would vary 
great ly with the pa tient , he added. 

Valium and Librium are generally used 
for short-term solutions, to stressful 
situations, Sinclair said. "Most doctors 
won't give over a week of medication. ' ' 

"I think you would find that there would 
not be repeated renewals (of prescriptions 
for Valium and Librium)," Robert Sinnett, 
director of mental health at Lafene, said. "A 
lot of these complaints are subjective; the 
trouble is determining how subjective." 

NONE OF the prescriptions received by 
staff members are renewable without a 
doctor's approval. 



All 10 staff members said the symptoms 
they described were accurate; but 
Buchanan said he exaggerated the degree of 
depression and Jan Davison, senior, said 
she exaggerated her symptoms of nausea. 

Davison complained of severe headaches 
which aspirin did not relieve, occasional 
nausea and trouble sleeping at night. The 
nurse took her temperature and blood 
pressure, Davison said. 

"I was called to see Dr. (Loren) 
Augustyn. He asked about my 
headaches. ..and wanted to know if 
migraines were in my history; I said yes," 
Davison said. "He examined my neck and 
said I had swollen lymph nodes. He also 
asked if I was congested and if 1 had a 
cough. 1 said no to the first and yes to the 
second. He also pressed on my stomach to 
see if I had internal pain when outside 
pressure was present; I said I didn't," she 
said. 

Augustyn then prescribed Darvocet, 
Fiorina! and Veetids, Davison said. 

Darvocet is a "semi-narcotic" that 
contains Darvon derivatives, Walascek 
said. 

"It's not a drug that is very good," 
Walascek said. "I would never prescribe 
it." 

Fiorina 1 is a compound containing aspirin, 
caffeine and a mild barbiturate, Walascek 
said, and should only be used in cases where 
migraine headaches are frequent. 

Veetids are penicillin, he said. 

"He (Augustyn) did not asked me if I was 
allergic to penicilten, nor did he warn me to 
avoid drinking (alcohol) while taking the 



downstown 

7 

I BROUGHT tDO 
A PRESENT, 



by Tim Downs 




Y\ 



MISTER POTATO 

HEAD. ORGANIC 

RJNFORTHE 

ENTIRE FAMILY" 



^ 



V. 




GOOD GRIGF, MOM, 
I CANT PLAY WITH 
THIS1 



"N 





PEANUTS 



by Charles Shulfc 



m STILL WORKING 
ON /VW 500K ABOUT 
THE LIFE OF BEETHOVEN 




ffcMEMfcKHOU in CHAPTER 

one there was this 
frustrate? gi& who 
kickephis Piano ?_ 




WELL, GUESS Ll>HAT 
HAPPENS IN CHAPTER TUK) 





SHE 

poes it 

iv 



1 




Crossword By Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 
1 Actor: 

Walter - 
5 Malay gibbon 
8 Newspaper 

section 

12 Part of 
GWTW 

13 Uncle 
(dial.) 

14 Arabian ruler 

15 Canadian 
prov. 

16 Enjoyable 
period 

IK Greeting or 
farewell 

20 Badger like 
animal 

21 Moray 

22 Crowd 

23 Disdain 
26 Mexican 

dishes 

30 Leap about 

31 Swiss river 

32 High note 

33 Applicant for 
admission 

36 Diminutive 
38 Macaw 



39 Chinese 
pagoda 

40 Rooms in 
Roman 
houses 

43 Adieu 
47 The Bible 

49 Lively 
dance 

50 Scottish 
Gaelic 

51 Land 
measure 

52 Exclamation 

53 Marsh grass 

54 Cognizance 



55 Miss 
Teasdale 
DOWN 

1 Biblical king 

2 Philippine 
knife 

3 Within: 
comb, form 

4 Commander 

5 Lawful 

6 Chinese port 

7 Early auto 

8 Jerusalem 
thorn 

9 Leave out 
10 Occasion 



Average solution time: 24 min 




Answer to yesterday's puzzle. 



11 Russian city 
17 A weight 
19 Cozy room 

22 Jostle 

23 Haggard 
novel 

24 To study 

25 Choose 

26 Make lace 

27 Meadow 

28 House wing 

29 Girl of song 
31 Miscellany 

34 Attacked 
suddenly 

35 Semite 

36 - Paulo 

37 Fine cotton 
fabric 

39 Visible sign 

40 Dyer's vat 

41 Ripped 

42 — of Sharon 

43 Author Vidal 

44 Bartok or 
Lugosi 

45 Time period 

46 Lohengrin's 
bride 

48" the Old 
- Tree" 




CRYPTOQU1P 12-5 

RYEY RXQDN NHYLK DSK QLXKHO- 

EM SJEXOYM NSJFFKL 

Yesterday's Cryptoqulp - PRIM GIRL IN GLASSES 
DISDAINS MALE PASSES. 

Today's Cryptoqulp: H equals N 



medication," Davison said. 

Fiorinal potentiates other drugs in the 
syslem more than Valium or Librium, 
Walascek said; so patients should be 
cautioned against mixing Fiorinal with any 
other drug. 

FIORINAL IS also slightly more habit- 
forming than Valium or Librium, Barry 
Sarvis, pharmacist at Barry's Drug Center 
in Manhattan, said. 

Another Collegian staff member, senior 
Julie Doll, also was given Fiorinal after she 
complained of headaches, backaches and 
insomnia resulting from stress. 

"I was in his (Dr. Robert Tout) office 
about seven minutes. He asked me what was 
bothering me, and I told him I had a lot of 
class work and an interview coming up," 
Doll said. "He said he couldn't change my 
personality, but he could give me something 
to relax my muscles. That was on a Thur- 
sday (Nov. 30) and on Monday I went back 
and got the prescription refilled," she said. 

"When I went back in, Dr. Tout asked me 
how much longer I thought the pressure 
causing my headaches would last; I said 
that after this week I would be home free," 
Doll said. "He then told me that I might try 
taking one instead of two tablets every four 
hours." 

Tout prescribed 20 tablets of Fiorinal both 
times, Doll said. The prescription label 
instructions said to take one or two tablets 
every four hours as needed. 

TWO STAFF members, juniors Dave 
Kaup and Grant Sanborn, were prescribed 
Dal mane, a sleeping aid. Kaup was given 
six 30-milligram tablets of Dalmane by Dr. 
James Christensen. 

"The doctor showed great concern about 
my psychological status and was reluctant 
to prescribe anything," Kaup said. "He 
recommended that I consider enrolling in 
biofeedback therapy or therapy at Lafene 
mental health. He also told me to come back 
ifthesymptoms continued," he said. 

Kaup told the doctor suffered from 
depression, anxiety and tension and could 
not concentrate. 

Sanborn saw Augustyn and complained of 
insomnia and sore neck and back muscles. 

IT TOOK 11 minutes to get the sleeping 
pills, Sanborn said. 

Dalmane is "probably the safest sleeping 
aid we have," Sinclair said, "although we 
don't use it much except here at the 
hospital." 

Walascek echoed Sinclair's approval of 
Dalmane, calling it his "number one drug 
for sleeping." Walascek, however, warned 
against taking Dalmane during the day 
because it can cause extreme drowsiness. 

Kim Meyer, senior, was the only staff 
member not to receive a tranquilizer, 
barbiturate or anti-depressant, although Dr. 
Watkins prescribed Ornade Spansules for 
bronchial congestion. 

Meyer told Watkins she had been sick and 
she felt "run down." 

"The history (medical history of the 
patient) is the key to everything," Sinclair 
said. "There is nothing a physician is going 
to find in an examination that would in- 
dicate the severity of stress and tension." 

Sandmeyer's medical history on record at 
Lafene includes a physical examination her 
freshman year, treatment for colds, an ear 
infection and the flu, she said. 

"The only time I had been to Lafene 
before this," Buchanan said, "was in the 
spring or 1976 when 1 had Herpes Zoster, 
also known as shingles." 



Collegian 
Classifieds 



FOR SALE 



MANHATTAN USED Furniture, 317 S. eth. Com* In and 
browse 77M 112. 13-75) 

WE SELL Mara nli and Phillips TbcH E lee Ironic Warehouse 
aero st from VI St* On ve Inn on Tuttle Creek Blvd. (23tf| 

MOSSMAN GUITARS— due to factory ahut down I have for a 
Short time soma very nice acoustic steel siring guitars at 
last than half original puce Call altar 5:00 p.m. 3t6 2?t 
2825 or 221-3968. Wlolield, KS [52-71) 

STUDDED SNOW I ires New. lit 13 Inch wheels 5394126 si 
tor 5 00 pm (87-69) 

MUST SELL 1972 mobile home 12x70. with patio and Shad 
Call 539-1639 alter 5:00 p.m. Of anytime on weekends (67- 
ft 

1077 BELLA Vista trailer house, two bedroom, furnished, 
skirted, shed Just Ilka new and in excellent location 537 
9503. (67 71| 

MOBILE HOME. 12x60. two bedroom, lots ot living apace, 
built in dressers. Skirted and tied down Nice lot 537 7198 
(67-7K 



(Continued on page 11) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tim., 



M*n 



11 



(Continued from p*g« 10) 

MUST SELL Nlc« 13 * 10. two bedroom mobile horns, par 
(tally furnished, fully carpeted, waehertdryer. Possession 
lit ol yaw. 537- 1 556 or i 4954401. aak »w Kathy (6448) 

1969 EL Camtno pick-up. full power, air conditioning, CB 
radio, air shocks, V-8, automatic. Mlcheiln ataal belted 
Ufa* Excellent condition, antra clean. Phone 7 76 ■6436. (84 

m 



12 x 65 KIRKWOOO, 3 

drapaa, skirled, shod, 

<B44ei 



i, two bath, new carpal and 
yard. Altar 600. 1 494-2735 



HE LP 1 1 I'M graduating and naad to aall my trader noma, 
Claan 10' x 88' comaa comptataly furnished and raady to 
mow* Into. Chiapsr than living In dorm or spartment. Call 
770-5882.(644*) 



1973 FRONTIER 12x80 two 
dryar, skirted, partially 



mobile home. 
778-3088 (8448) 



1978 HOMETTE mobile noma, 14x70, thraa bsdrooms, com- 
pletely lurnlshed, central air, aklrtad, lie downa. Excellent 
condition. Call 537-4086 after 5:00 p m. (6549) 

GUNS, NEW selection, Colt, Ruger, SAW, R.G.. Llama, Ex 
can, Lugar, Titan, Winchester, others. Excellent selection 
ol caliber. Treasure Chest, Old Town. (6549) 

COINS MAKE excellent gilts. Complete selection U.S. and 
Foreign. Blrlhyearand anniversary sets available. Treasure 
Cheat, Old Town Mall— Agglevl lie. (65-76) 

CHESS SETS, hand carved, wooden and onyx. Also Cheas 
tables and backgammon sals. Ideal Christmas gilts. 
Treasure Chest, Agglevllle. (65-78) 

ANTIQUE JEWELRY and watchea, nice selection ol the 
classic old styles lor Christmas. Old Town Mall and 
Agglevllle. (65-74) 

JUST PURCHASED 500 used science fiction paperbacks. 

Remarkable selection. Treasure Cheat, 1124 Moro, 
Agglevllle. Also have westerns, romances, novels, detec- 
tives. (8549) 

1972 javelin, power brakes, steering , excellent condition. 
sharp looking. Only *999 Call tor Lou at 539-5033 (6549) 

SEARS 14,000 BTU air conditioner Used two summers, ex- 
cel lent condition. Only tlOO. Call 7784763 altar 5:00 p.m. 
(8849) 

1988 CHEVROLET Slacayne, 8 cylinders, air conditioner, 
everything In perfect condition. Beat offer over 8350. Call 
7764763 after 5:00p.m. (6540) 

STEREO SYSTEM In excellent condition. Realistic STA44B 
stereo receiver, two Realistic electros tat 2* speakers, 
Sony TC 270 real to real stereo laps recorder with 
speakers, all this lor only 1400. Call 7784783 attar 5:00 
p.m. (6549) 

SNARK. MACH II sailboat 88 square foot sail. Phone 837- 
0827 (6648) 

TYPEWRITER SMC 2200, three years old. 7784301. (6648) 

OAK ROCKER, oak swivel desk chair, oak library labia, hall 
tree, oak dresser, pla cupboard and cheat. 776-9705 after 
5:00 p.m. (67-71) 



NEW 14 WIDE HOMES 
AS LOW AS $8,850! 

Payments Less Than Rent 

Used Homes For Sale 
F Homes For Rent 

WOODY'S MOBILE 
HOME SALES 

2044 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 

Manhattan, Kansas 66502 

913-539-5621 

Approved FHA-VA Financing 



"MARBLE CHESS Sal". Bowling ball, mechanical nut 
cracker. 50 gal. Iron pot with aland Telephone 776-5050 
(8748) 

USED KINS alia water bad; complete Kit Included 7740336. 
(68-711 

1S74 HONDA Civic, 89,000 miles. New paint, rebuilt engine. 
American racing wheals, T.A. radlala 537-2050 (6S70) 

1974 GREMLIN, black, lull power, V4 engine. New tires Call 
537-2050. (66-70) 

HEATH H4 mtcromplor wllh 4K memory. Complete with sof- 
tware and documentation. Will build complete system at a 
reasonable cost. 539-5958. (88 72) 



"ROCK N ROLL" 
GOODIES! 

Guitars, Amps & P.A.'s demon- 
strated in a Large club size area. 
( NOW FULLY CARPETED) 
Come in and SEE! 
Gibson L6S-Custom vv/case 
was 688.00 now $349.00 

Gibson EB series Bass gtr. 
was 329.00 now $199.00 

Fender Stratocaster Nat. (New) 

♦Special* 
Ibanez Les Paul Cust. Copy 

(collectable) 
was 349.00 now $239.00 

Gibson J-45 Dlxe Acoustic ( new) 
was 519.00 now $379,00 

at 

MUSIC VILLAGE 

417 Humboldt Downtown Thurs. till 8:30 



14 x 70 WIN0SOB, two bedroom excellent condition Good 
Investmeni. tow monthly payments, fenced yard, stereo, DW. 
GO central air. large shed. Located near Tuttle Creak 
Available Jan tst 5379132 (68-71) 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS TI-57 programmable calculator. $45. 
Th25 scientific calculator, 125. TI-59 software: S tatlstics. 
electronic engineering, securities enf printer utility 539- 
5958 (68 72) 



Pecans 

FOR SALE DEC. 7&8 

At Upper Research 

Greenhouse directly 

north of Dickens Hall 

from 7:30 a.m. to 

5:30 p.m. 

By Horticulture 
Club 

All pre-cracked-in 

multiples of 5 lb. bags 

only$1.30/lb. 



SONY NR 115 professional Dolby noise reduction adapter. 
One year warranty. Calibration tapes are Included for 
casssette and reel-to reel recorders. 539-5958 (88-72) 

ONE MINI GYM quedrlcap and hamstring leg machine. Ex- 
cellent Christmas present lor an elhlele, 778-1054. (66-71) 



FOR RENT 



TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electrics and manuals; day, week 
or month. Bunsils, 511 Leavenworth, across from post of- 
fice. Call 7749480. (Hf) 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS: Excellent selection. Hull Business 
Machines, 1212 Moro. 539-7931. Service most makes of 
typewriters. Also Victor and Ollvalll addara. (tetf) 

SANTA SUITS. Reserve yours now. Treasure Cheat, 
Agglevllle. (43-76) 

LARGE TWO bedroom apartmant with two steeping lofts, 
1270, bills paid, at 1018 Osage. 537-4233. (57-71) 

LARGE ONE bedroom furnlahed apartmant at 221 N. Juliette. 
Water, trash, and heal paid, *160 per month. 776-3868 or 1- 
496-9814(84 76) 

AVAILABLE JAN. 1 -One bedroom furnished apartmant, car- 
peted, S155/month. Call 7764274 after 6:00 p.m. (6448) 

COZY ONE bedroom baeemenl apartment. One block Irom 
campus Available January tat. 8130 a month. Call 776- 

3007 after 5:00 pm (8448) 

DUPLEX, FURNISHED, Mont Blue apartments One block 
from campus All conveniences, available tor second 
semester. 5374058. (4549) 

UNIVERSITY PARK, fumlehed house Throe bedrooms. 
Modem. Call 536-4 162. (8549) 

NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 

from $165 

• FREti shuttle service to 

KSU 

• portion of utilities paid 

• adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

PHONE 

539-2951 

or see at 
1413 Cambridge Place 



SMALL ONE bedroom apartmant, shower, near campus. 
I115and electricity. 5374141 efterSiOOp.m (6549) 

PLUSH, TWO bedroom furnished apartment, carpeted, cen- 
tral air, laundry dishwasher balcony, near campus. 
Agglevllle, January. $260 7764600 after 5 00 p.m. (66-70) 

NOW AVAILABLE newly carpeted two bedroom house Call 
532-3121 or 537 1269. Ask for Terry. (66-70) 

TWO BEDROOM basement apartment, furnished. 
Washer/dryer hook up. J1S0 plus KPL, at 1822 Hunting, one 
half block from KSU. 5304401 . (8840) 

LARGE FURNISHED apartmant at 1018 Osage, bedrooms 
and sleeping lolls, good for 34 people. 1250. bills paid. 
537-4233,(66-95) 

FURNISHED BEDROOMS, kitchen and laundry facilities, 
tree parking and walk to KSU. S55 and up, bills paid. 537- 
4233(66-95) 



WILDCAT INN 

2nd Semester 

Seniors Graduating 

Make Limited Availability 

For 2nd Semester 

Occupancy 

Call 

CELESTE 

for Information 

539-5001 



ONE BEDROOM furnished basement apartment with private 
entrance. Call 776 3562. (8748) 

THROUGH MAY, furnished two bedroom apartment Dish- 
washer air conditioned. Available January 1 Close to cam- 
pus Call 537 7268 alter 5:30 p.m. (67-71) 



HUGE ROOM to rani, US/month, all utilities paid, kitchen, 
laundry (acuities Five minute walk to campus. Call 532 
6850 (94). Leave massage for Rich Etteneon, will return 
call. (64-71) 

LARGE. FURNISHED, two bedroom apartment. One and one 

hall blocks from campus, ground floor, clean. No leese, no 
patl. 1 150 plus electricity, 539-4275. (68-72) 

UNIQUE ONE bedroom lumrahed apartment. On* Mock from 
campus. Ideal for married couple or singles 539-1324. (68- 

89) 

MUST SEE this large one bedroom furnished duplex. 
Redecorated, country setting, close to town. 1186. No 
pets. 7764646 (68-72) 

ONE BEDROOM furnished apartmant. Utilities paid, dapoalt 
required no pats. 537-9734 or 776-5763 (68-71) 

NEAR CAMPUS, 2 or 3 males, private rooma, nice brick 
home 5374283 or 539-2683. (88-76) 

ONE BEDROOM, near campus, spacious, all street parking, 
heal paid, available Jan. 1st. S 180 1 131 Valtler 776-9698 
evenings. (68-70) 

EFFICIENCY APARTMENT, near campus, haat paid, 
available Jan. 1, |135, quiet person preferred, 1131 Vetller. 
7764696. (6B- 70) 



SUBLEASE 



SECOND SEMESTER. Large, partly furnished two I 
house, one hell block Irom campus and Agglevllle 
Available Jan. 1st. (185, Rick or Wade. 7784108. (68-71) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

FEMALES TO share exceptional house al KSU. furnished, 
private bedrooms. 865 and up. washer and dryer, no pets, 
st 809 N 1 1th 5394401. (5746) 

TWO FOR great house two blocks from campus. Own 
bedroom, two baths, basement, garage, pets, |70/month 
plus 10 utilities, Proa cable and HBO. 7764204. (6448) 

QUIET, NONSMOKING male to share one bedroom fur- 
nlahed apartment tor spring semester. (94Amonlh plus 172 
utilities. 539-5932. (6448) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester. Private bedroom, laundry. 
Four blocks Irom campus. 875 per month plus one fourth 
Utilities. Call 778-3644. (6549) 

FEMALE NEEDED for spring semester to share furnished 
thraa bedroom apartmant. Large private room. 896. 
Utlllt les pah). Call Catharine, 5394444 (8549) 

RESPONSIBLE MALE to share two bedroom mobile homa, 
880 month plus one half utilities. Aak lor Don 5324620, 
776-4920(6648) 

MALE TO share large house one block from KSU. Private 
bedroom, furnished. 170 at 1106 Stuemont 5394401. (86- 
95) 

FEMALE TO share two bedroom furnished apartment close 
to campus. 1 100 month plus electricity. 776492a (6646) 

LIBERAL MALE or female roommate tor second semester 
Two bedroom spsrtment one block Irom campus. 880 mon- 
th. 776-7368 attar 4:00 p.m. (66-70) 

FEMALE FOR apring semester, low Mils, 1100 month, private 
bedroom, 776-7368 after 4.00 pjn. (64-70) 

FEMALE WANTED lo share luxurious large new two 
bedroom trailer house, convenient local km. S80 plus one 
third utilities 776- 7610(86- 70) 



MALE TO share nice baaemsnt apartmant two blocks horn 
AgoktvMIe and four blocks from campus. Can Korby 774- 
J064.a»6-70) 

TWO FEMALES for apring semester lo sham large four 
bedroom house Private rooma tor 888 plus one sixth 
utilities. Call 5374904. (67-71) 

NON-SMOKING female roommate needed tor Spring 
semester Share nice apartmant with two others. 887-50 
month plus one third ulllttlee. 776461 1. (B744) 

NEEDED: TWO roommate* for next semester Pais allowed. 
Cheap and close to campus. Call 778-3570. (67-76) 

FEMALES, TO share large furnished apartmant. Walk lo cam- 
pus. 175 month. Utilities paid Call 539-2663. (87-76) 

U8ERAL MALE lo share nice, completely furnished apart- 
ment lor spring semester. $90 month plus one third 
utilities. Call Don 7764071.(67-71) 

MALE ROOMMATE wanted, two bedroom apartment, close 
lo campus. 885 plua one third utilities. Call 539-5175, keep 
trying. (8749) 



HELP WANTED 



EXTRA HOURS earn you $500 per 1000 stuffing envelope* 
with our circulars. For Information: S&S Enterprise, Oept. 
11, P 0. 1158, Mlddletown, OH 45042, (53-77) 

OVERSEAS JOBS— Summer/lull time. Europe, S. America. 
Australia, Asia, etc. All field*, $500-1200 monthly, ex- 
penses paid, sightseeing. Free Info. Write: International 
Job Center, Bos 4490-KB, Berkeley, C A 94704 (80-79) 

AGGIE STATION I* now taking applications for waitresses 
waiters. Apply In parson, 1 1 15 Moro after 4:O0 p.m. (65-70) 

JANITOR— FULL lima, mostly day*. Ap-i/ in parson, ofllce 
525, Rameda Inn. 18549) 

BURGER KING wants Individual 10 work two nights during 
the week. 7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. One weekend night 
required 7:00 p.m to 3:00 e.m. Start $2.65 par hour. $3 after 
one month. Contact Mr. Wagner or Mr. Nelson In parson. 
(68-76) 

STUDENT WITH knowledge and background In swimming 
pools snd swimming pool maintenance. Pay $3 hour. 
Inquire al Neletortum olllce or call Karen el 5324390, (47- 
88) 

WAITRESS-WAITERS end bus persons part-time work. Good 
working conditions, good wsges plu* meel*. Apply now In 
person to start when you come back for second sameater. 
Reynard 'a Restaurant. (66-71) 



SERVICES 



RESUMES WRITTEN Irom scratch, 818 end up Also general 
typing, wrillng. edlllng. Fast Action Reaumee, 415 N. 3rd, 
537-7294 (84-76) 

STEREO REPAIR, over 600 replacement styles In stock The 
Circuit Shop, 776-1221. 1 204 Moro SI (6-78) 



SOUPENE 
COMPUTER 

WHEEL 
ALIGNMENT 

1 14 South 5th Phone 776-8054 



THE OFFSET Press prints anything: resumes, brochures, let- 
terheads, posters, pamphlets, newspapers. Let u* do your 
nevt job 317 Houston. 776-4889. 122 If) 



ENGAGEMENT RINGS, wadding sets Custom designing kt 
gold and silver. Jewelry repair Including antique Jewelry. 
Cuslom Jewelers, 539-3225. 41 IN Third. (55-74) 

CHRISTMAS PORTRAITS. P**W, charcoal and pencil 
likeness, g u aran teed Prices from $5 to $15. Live or from 
photo. Call 7763684. (80-78) 

WILL DO typing Harm papers, resumes, etc ) any type of 
malarial. Am experienced Call 7784088. 186-69) 

IS YOUR Volkawagon hard to shift In cold weather? Wa can 
install a transmission oil that make* your shifter easy lo 
shltt and protect* your transmission batter. Call JAL Bug 

Service for Information. 1 494-2368. (88-70) 

WOULD LIKE to have typing fobe, either Mg or small 
Reasonable rates Contact Debbie after 5:00 or weekends 
at 5374922 (6749) 



ATTENTION 

FREE MOTHER ol Pearl or turquoise earring* with every $46 
purchase while supply lasts. Buy al our sale prices 1/3 oft 
all Inventory except gold and scrimshaw and receive your 
tree pair. Men's choker* $10. Man's beautiful gold and 
sliver hand-made turquoise rings $46, Wooden In laved belt 
buckles $9 Ladies' mother ol pearl necklace $10. Ring* $6. 
Bracelet s $6. Opal pendants only $21 . We also have scenic 
picture Jasper, tiger eye. fire sgale* and malachite, all 1/3 
off. Ladles Sterling silver chokers 1/2 oft only $3 Stickpins 
$6. Over 300 pair assorted earrings $2 each Wlndftre 
Jewelry, 230 N 3rd. Open IftOO a. m -5:30 p.m. Do your 
Christmas early I (62 76) 

ATTENTION LADIES: KSU football recruiting has started and 
wa need you lor Kitten Krulter*. Involves Saturday af- 
ternoons hosting recruits lor lunch and lour of Manhattan. 
If Interested, call 532-5678. (65-71) 

THE FOLLOWING people have not picked up their 1978 
Royal Purples. Please come lo Kedile 103 and do so. Lan- 
ce David Colls. Cynthia A. Collins, Roberto Colons, James 
Colvln, Lawrence Combs, Clyde Connaly, Brant Alfred 
Cook, Lisa Anna Coon. Sharyl L. Copenhaver. (6846) 

WEST HALL weak I* roll In' I Tonight I* a Gold Room dinner 
wllh 315 karats, than a super program. Happy Tuesday! (68) 



NOTICES 

MANHATTAN PAWN Shop, 317 S. 4th Street, 77S- 
6112— stereos, 8-1 racks, TV's, typewriters, guitars, 
cameras. Buy-sell -I red*. (3-751 

THE FOLLOWING people have not picked up their 1978 
Royal Purples. Please coma to Kedile 103 and do so. Lan- 
ce David Colle, Cynthia A. Collins, Roberto Colon, Jama* 
Colvln, Lawrence Combs. Clyde Connaly, Brent Alfred 
Cook, Llss Anne Coon, Sharyl L. Copenhaver, (8848) 



Men's & Women's 
Hair Cuts 
$5 ALONE 

Lucille's— WestLoop 

SHIPPING OVERSEAS after graduation 7 Call Overseas Ship- 
ping Consultants for rata* and tree estimate: 7764213, 
Box 095, Manhattan. (68-76) 

DISCO FANTASY 

Sponsored by 

Aggie Sound Enterprises 

1606 Fairchild, Manhattan 
776-9279 or 532-3439 

Now taking bookings for the 
Spring semester. Prices any- 
where from $50 to $250, depending 
on location and equipment you 
desire. 

Call for an appointment to see and hear 
the disco show in operation, 

Steve Pfannenstiel, D.J. 
Jeffrey K. Johnston, owner 

SAVE 5014 on down garments by sewing them yourself. An 
Altra lactory representstlve will show you how st the Path- 
finder today. Dec. 5 at 4:00 p.m and 7:30 p.m. (68) 

WOULD YOU Ilka to hear Christmas carols sung In Chinese? 
See tomorrow's Collegian lor details. (68) 



WANTED 



MmLE TWENTY plus to share recently remodeled home on 
Valtler SI. Musi enjoy living in clean house and be willing 
to do his part lo keep It clean. 5394206. (6549) 

CHRISTIAN ROOMMATE for spring term. Call 539-1513 aak 
lor John (68 72) 



LOST 



SLUE BACKPACK In Darby Food Canter Including three 
books, Important notebooks and calculator. Reward. 902 
Haymaker Hall. 532-3870 (68-70) 



FOUND 



SET OF keys on leather key chain. Call 539-2373 and aak tor 
Robfc-I. (8648) 

FEMALE GERMAN Shepherd pup. 12 weeks old. al Manual- 
tan and Thurston Av*. Pleaee contact Animal Shelter 
before D*c.ll.r»7-7i) 

CALCULATOR. CLAIM and Identity In Weber 117. (68-70) 



PERSONAL 



TRICIA, I'M the person who lost the billfold you found. Now 
I've lost your number, pleaee call back— Vsl. (6748) 

SENIORS— DON 7 lorget Friday's big TO IF party at Da** 
Horse Tavern Deo. 8, 1 flO p.m 4:00 p.m. (87-71) 

KSU MARCHING Bend-Thenke lor tha great season this 
year. Our Banddaddy's the Greatest I Watch the Bart tone * 
become II . Hare wa come Londonl Jeff (8748) 

D. KNOLL, since when do you sleep wllh a "supporting" 
blind fold. In the powder room, and all tied up? (68) 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY Jennlferl YouYe the greatest little slsterl 
Your PI Kappa Phi big brothers, Dave and Kelly, (88) 

MICHAEL I'M ju-eteln' to tall you the last live are Just trie 
beginning Three's to ye— Dear (68) 

JIM, THERE'S no one elae I'd rather work all night with. You 
ware great. Love, Monica. (88) 

THE PERSON who had tha four year ofd mala britlany lor 
sale, please call 532-3329, aak for Mary. (68) 

TO MY favorite person In the whole work), happy an- 
niversary I love you, Jan. (88) 



KANSAS ST AT a ursTnorn*. 






<* /i rt r ^m»# 



12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tu*.,Dw»mtorS,10?S 



- 



K-Sfaf e professor receives 
minority education award 



By JEAN HARNESS 
Collegian Reporter 

K-State's minority 
has earned James 
curriculum and in- 



Contributions to 
education program 
Boyer, professor of 
struction, the first Presidential Award for 
Distinguished Service to Minority 
Education. 

The honor, created by President Acker, 
will be an annual award. It is given to a 
professor or administrator who has con- 
tributed the most for the improvement of K- 
State's image in the eyes of minorities and 
the low-income white. 

"I feel this is quite an honor, and 1 want to 
thank the students who nominated me," 
Boyer said. "I think other professors and 
administrators do a lot for the minorities, 
and I was pleasantly surprised when I 
received the award." 

Boyer said he believes his professorship is 
more than just a job, "it is a way of life." 

BOYER SAID he is involved in fostering 
and understanding what the minority people 
are all about. 

"I was a real disciple of Martin Luther 
King, and I was a grad student when be was 
killed," he said. "I made my decision then, 
not to give my life, but my career, to bring 
higher equality understanding between 
minorities and non-minorities. The way I do 
that is through teaching, speaking, writing, 
research and being personally involved with 
students and people. 

"1 have tried to create courses for people 
on campus and in the state that will broaden 
their knowledge of minorities," Boyer said. 
Courses created by are Education of 
Economically Disadvantaged, Topics on 
Multi-cultural Understanding, Curriculum 
in the Inner City, and Curriculum Materials 
for Ethnic. 

Boyer has written proposals and received 
funds to conduct race desegregation 
training institutions. He is presently 
working on a multi-cultural institution in 
Kansas City, Ten senior and junior high 
schools are involved with the institution and 
are beginning a curriculum for reductions of 
stereotypes and cross-radical un- 
derstanding. 

"So many instructors think of minorities 
as a problem instead of an asset and a 
challenge. Their differences and strengths 
should be built upon in an academic process. 
Instructors should have the ability to see 
these strengths but it is difficult for much of 
the staff. 

"Many instructors think if they are not 
like me they will be hard to work with.' 
Minorities have varying styles of com- 
munication, styles of learning and different 
reference points on discussion issues, and 
that seems to make an instructor shut 
minorities out," Boyer said. 

HE SAID many teachers, professors and 
administrators see how little they can get by 
with doing for minorities, instead of the 
positive approach of seeing how much can 
be done. 

"Many are not aware of how to approach a 
class about minorities. Visual aids, required 
reading, is mainly a caucasion and 
European experience and exceptionss are 
rare," Boyer said. 

The libraries need to change and have 
more diversity, so people can benefit from 
other societies than that of their own, he 
said. 

"I have elected to remain in the 
professorship position so I can work closer 
with the students. In the future 1 hope to 
strengthen student ties. My long-range goal 
is to achieve a distinguished professorship, 
it is the height of a professorship. The way a 



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professor earns the distinguished 
professorship is through much writing and 
research. So I intend to write more books, 
and reach a wider audience of educational 
equity," he said. 

Boyer received the Martin Luther King 
Award in 1976, and also the Bicentennial 
award the same year. Boyer will be 
recognized at the president's reception for 
fall term graduates Sunday afternoon, Dec. 
10, in the K-State Ballroom. He will receive 
an inscribed plaque and a $500 cash prize. 

"1 do applaud President Acker for 
establishing such an award and I hope it will 
be included in the commencement program 
where a larger Kansas community can see 
what K-State is doing for minorities," he 
said. 




JAMES BOYER 



Stall pnotq by Com Anderson 




The book 

no college student 

should be without. 

It may not contain any great reading material, but it does 
contain some truly wonderful eating material. 

That's because our indispensable book is a book of 
McDonald's® Gift Certificates. It costs only five dollars (it's an 
inexpensive soft cover edition). And each of the ten 
certificates inside is worth fifty cents toward the purchase of 
delicious McDonald's hamburgers, our golden fries and all our 
other good food. 

So, when your scholar is starved for more than knowledge, 
make sure he has a book of our Gift Certificates around. 

It'll give him food for thought. 

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KANSAS STATS HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
TOPEKA, KS 66618 



EXCll 




We're gonna getcha! 

K-State Coach Jack Hartman 
shakes hands with and points a 
finger at Minnesota Coach Jim 
Duteher before Tuesday nighfs 
basketball game at Ahearn Field 
House. Hartman's gesture turned 
out to be a warning to Duteher as 
the Wildcats beat the Golden 
Gophers, 72-62. See related pictures 
and story, pages 15 and 16. 



5la)t photo by Bo Racier 






Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Wednesday 

December 6, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol.65, No.69 



Members feel uninformed 



LRPC: 'Rubber stamp' 




9 $ 



y 



Inside 

fz:nr\r\ ur 



By DEBBIE RHEIN 
Collegian Reporter 

After a history of what some members 
call being sidestepped, used as a scapegoat 
or just plain ignored, K-State*s Long-Range 
Planning Committee has a chance of 
changing that tradition. 

The committee is charged by the 
president with making recommendations on 
the following: setting up general guidelines 
for the physical development of campus, 
setting priorities among building and 
campus development, choosing building 
sites and reviewing the final plans to ensure 
they meet campus development guidelines. 

"What it amounts to is if it goes wrong, it 
is pretty easy for him to say the long-range 
planning committee OK'd it and they 
represent faculty and students,' " said Jim 
Griffin, a student representative on the 
committee. 

Although the committee was set up to 
advise the president, many members and 
former members said they haven't had 
enough informat ion to do their job, 

THE DECISION regarding what the 
committee looks at has been made in the 



past by Paul Young, the vice-president for 
University Facilities, If there was anything 
Young believed didn't have to be con- 
sidered, it wasn't brought before the 
committee, said Tom Hollinberger, a for- 
mer student member. 

The renovation of Anderson Hall, the work 
done on Stonehouse and the playground are 
all improvements that weren't brought 
before the committee, Young said. 

"In a very general way, they were looked 
at," Young said. "We would report a list of 
projects that we were going to request 
funding for and they would approve it as a 
group." 

Young said there was no need for the 
committee to review renovations, unless the 
possibilty of tearing a building down is being 
considered, 

Jeff Stafford, a student member of the 
committee and designer of the Stonehouse 
playground, said he believed that project 
should have been brought for the com- 
mittee's consideration. 

"When I was on the committee, the 
committee didn't make any decisions 
concerning the placement and priorities of 
any buildings on the list," Don Gibson, 



another former student member, said. 

HOLL1NGBERGER said the amount of 
time involved in planning a building was 
such that by the time the committee con- 
sidered a project, plans had already 
progressed so far they couldn't recommend 
any changes without throwing away money 
spent on research. 

"That is what made us into a rubber- 
(see HAPHAZARD, p. 6» 



GOOD MORNING, tenants of Wit lard 
Hall are having trouble with ventilation 
and believe it warrants a new building. 
Details, page 6... 

KSDB WILL have to go through some 

changes due to a FCC regulation. Details, 
pages... 

HOWARD BAKER and Shirley 
Temple Black are two of the Landon 
Lecture speakers slated for spring 
semester. Details, page 20... 



Supreme Court defines 
saloon in liquor law 



Dole tells farmers ' summit 
Congress will listen to them 



COLLEGE STATION, Texas (AP)-Sen. 
Robert Dole (H Kan.) said Tuesday night 
that he could understand why the American 
farmers were frustrated but that perhaps 
some time soon, "Congress will come to 
grips with reality." 

Dole, speaking at the National Farm 
Summit in this Central Texas university 
community, said he remembered the 
American Agricultural Movement's visit to 
Washington last year and "I believe people, 
all people, have the right to petition this 
government." 

The AAM has been a vocal and viable 
force during the three days of the national 
summit, a session aimed at solving the 
major problems of the American farmer. 

Dole, the Republican vice presidential 
nominee in 1976, said he believed this farm 
meeting "would be the type of forum that 
could move toward a final agreement 



among the the agriculture industry," 

The senatpr said that commodity 
agreements establishing minimum and 
maximum prices are "inherently un- 
workable, A number of past commodity 
agreements have failed. ...The U.S. 
producer can do better in a free market 
environment." 

Dole said that when the 96th congress 
convenes in January two immediate con- 
cerns will be "assuring consumers adequate 
supplies of food and meat import 
legislation." 

A Kansas farmer advised conference 
delegates earlier Tuesday, "This nation was" 
built on the profit motive and not on a free- 
market system." 

James Kramer, speaking during a session 
in farm income problems, said, "The far- 
mer wants to get out of the back of the 
economic bus. 



TOPEKA lAP)— The term "open saloon" 
means any establishment open to the public, 
without discrimination, where alcoholic 
beverages are dispensed or sold and served 
for consumption on the premises," a 
majority of the Kansas Supreme Court said 
Tuesday. 

But a dissenting minority of the seven 
Supreme Court justices said that under 
restrictions written into a 1978 law seeking 
to authorize the sale of liquor by the drink in 
restaurants, such establishments would in 
no sense be "sa loons , ' ' 

The views were outlined in formal 
opinions setting out the reasoning of the 
court in the 4-3 decision announced Nov, 13 
holding the restaurant liquor law to be 
unconstitutional. 

At the same time, in separate actions, the 
Supreme Court granted the Kansas 
Department of Revenue and the Kansas 
Motel and Hotel Association until Dec. 15 to 
file motions for rehearing in the case. 

The Department of Revenue was the 
named defendant in the case, filed by 
Attorney General Curt Schneider, to test the 
validity of the law. The Motel and Hotel 
Association was allowed to intervene in 
defense of the case. "A food service 
establishment which is open to the public 
and dispensing or selling alcholic beverages 
for consumption on the premises is an open 
saloon, and the comparative revenue 
derived from food or alcoholic liquor is 
immaterial," the majority said. 

Under the 1978 law, restaurants deriving 
at least 50 percent of their receipts from the 
sale of food could be licensed to sell 



alcoholic beverages by the drink in counties 
were approval was voted. 

In the Nov. 7 election, voters in 15 counties 
approved the plan. Voters in 30 counties 
rejected it. There was not sufficient interest 
to petition elections in the other 00 counties. 

THE VIEWS of the Supreme Court were 
set out in, three opinions. The majority 
opinion was written by Chief Justice Alfred 
Schroeder. A separate opinion agreeing with 
the majority decision was writen by Justice 
Kay Mc Far land, with agreement by Justice 
Perry Owsley. The fourth justice on the side 
of the majority was Alex From me. 

Justice Richard Holmes wrote a 
dissenting opinion. Joining in the dissent 
were Justices David Prager and Robert 
Miller. 

In the majority opinion, the chief justice 
said that prohibitory provisions in a con- 
stitution are self-executing to the extent that 
anything done in violation of them is void. 

He noted that the constitutional provision 
legalizing the sale of alcoholic beverages in 
Kansas, but prohibiting the open saloon, did 
not give the legislature authority to define 
the term "open saloon." 

JUSTICE Schroeder said it is true that the 
Legislature may enact legislation to 
facilitate or assist in the operation of a 
prohibitory provision provided the 
legislation is in harmony with and does not 
annul the provisions of the Constitution. 

"However," he added, "this does not give 
the Legislature carte blance (full 
discretionary power) to circumvent the 
mandates of the Constitution." 






KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wed., Pocembf 6, 1»7» 



City approves $30,000 for industry recruitment 



By MICHAEL REAM 

and JILL FORGY 

Collegian Reporters 

City commissioners unanimously ap- 
proved funds totaling $30,000 to be used by 
the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce to 
recruit new business and industry to 
Manhattan. 

Jim Rothschild, director of economic 
development for the Chamber of Com- 
merce, said the money will help "provide 
services for economic development" and 
"bring in outside industry" to Manhattan. 

Some money will be used to expand 
Manhattan's industrial park, he said. 

He said more jobs will be available as new 
businesses come to Manhattan. This creates 
more money for people to spend, Rothschild 
said. 

Rothschild said some funds will be used to 
study industries in other cities that might be 
beneficial to Manhattan. 

According to United States Chamber of 
Commerce studies, for every too jobs 
created in a community, approximately $1 
million in economic revenues are created, 
Rothschild said. 

This money will be turned over ap- 
proximately seven times; this means it will 
change hands from person to person about 
seven ti mes, he said . 

Commissioner Ed Home described the 
funds as "money well spent." 

Commissioner Terry Glasscock said, "I 
can't think of any money that gives us better 
return (to Manhattan)," and said if any 
more money was available he would be in 
favor of giving it to the Chamber of Com- 
merce for this purpose. 

Glasscock said Manhattan is quickly 
being recognized as one of the cities "tops in 
the state ... for bringing in good clean em- 
ployers." 

Commissioners also approved a contract 
with the Chamber of Commerce providing 



convention and tourism activities in the city. 

THE CITY will transfer all funds obtained 
through the Transient Guest Acts to the 
Chamber of Commerce for this purpose. 

Rothschild said funds are now obtained by 
a 1.5 percent tax on motel and hotel rooms. 

He said the money is used primarily to 
attract tourism and conventions to 
Manhattan. 

Home said the Chamber of Commerce has 
a good track record with these activities and 
it's headed in the right direction in this area. 

Bids were received for the second time on 
the Sunset Zoo winter quarters by the 
Manhattan City Commission in Tuesday 
night's meeting. 

The contract was awarded to R.M. Baril 
General Contractors, Inc., of Manhattan, 
the lowest bidder at $63,671 . 

According to Bruce McCallum, 
Manhattan director of services, the bids 
received earlier this year by the com- 
mission all exceeded the amount of money 
available. 

The proposed plans for the winter quar- 
ters were then scaled down and an ad- 
ditional $5,000 was added to the budget, he 
said. 

The building will be attractive, McCallum 
added. 

"In the future it will have limestone to fit 
in with the buildings already in the area," he 
said. McCallum said the building will be 
equipped with plants and skylights which 
will enlarge its lighting capabilities. 

A park located north of Fort Riley Blvd. 
and Westwood Road is being considered for 
sale by the city. 

The property was dedicated to the city as 
park land but because of its character it is 
difficult to maintain, said Gary Stith, chief 
city planner. 

THE CITY will encounter problems in 
attempting to dispose of the land, said Bill 
Frost, city attorney. 



It is a general rule that it is improper for 
the city to use land for anything after it is 
dedicated as a park, he said. 

The city could declare the land unusable 
and unsuitable for park land and inform the 
public that they would benefit by the 
transfer of the land's ownership, he said. 

City manager Don Harmon advised the 
commission to delay a work session to 
discuss the matter until after the holidays. 
According to Harmon, owners of adjacent 
properties would be difficult to contact in 
the next few weeks. 

A work session has been tentatively 



scheduled for Jan. 2 to further discuss the 
disposal of the land. 

Harmon informed the commission that 
court-appointed appraisers of the Scrithf ield 
property may appraise the land for an 
amount exceeding the $55,000 allocated for it 
inthecity'sbudget. 

Harmon said the city may abandon the 
suit if this happens. "If the suit is not 
abandoned, we may end up with the land 
and no money to develop it," Harmon said. 

The city is proceeding in a condemnation 
action suit that will allow them to develop 
the land for the Aggieville Parking Lot 
Project. 



International Christmas Festival 




7:00 Friday, Dec. 8 

International Student Center 

AH Students Welcome 

Refreshments will be provided 

Tree trimmings and a program on how Christmas 

in other countries is planned. 

Sponsored by: ISG, Spurs, Phi Upsilon, I' KM 




Cam pus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE INTERNATIONAL CHRISTMAS PARTY It at 7 p.m. 
Friday '" the international Student Center, all students are 
Invited. 

ASME CHRISTMAS BANQUET I* Friday, tickets are 
available In Seaton IM. 

CONCERT JAZI ENSEMBLE will hold a concert at 10:30 
a.m. today In the Union 

FRUIT CAKES are now on sale In S he 1 1 enter ger 701 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS will have a book sale in the 
EE library today 11 a.m. 3 p.m. 

A SUMMER EMPLOYMENT ORIENTATION meeting Is 
scheduled lor J» p.m. Thursday in Kedile 104, any 
student Interested tn summer employment is invited, 

PHI ALPHA THETA will be selling Untcer Christmas 
cards in the Union today and Thursday 10 a.m. J p.m. 

* TODAY 

GERMAN TABLE will meet In Union Stateroom 1 at 11:30 
p.m 

OO CLUB will meel in Union 70S ? 10 p m 

STUDENTS FOR HANDICAPPED CONCERNS will meet 
in Union 30? atS p.m. 

ECON CLUB will meet In Waters lit at J p.m. 

TRANSFER STUDENT TASK FORCE Will meet in 
FairchildlOl at 4 p.m. 

TOUCHSTONE will meet In Union !0J at 8 p.m. 



NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN STUDENT BODY will 
meet in Union 205 at 1 : 30 p.m 

UNIVERSITY FOR MAN will Show the movie "Tne 
integral Urban House" at 7 30 p.m at the UFM House. 1211 
Thurston. 

THURSDAV 

A.I.Ch.E. will meet in Denlson U3A at 4:30 p.m. 

BUMPATHON EXECUTIVE BOARD Will meet at the 
Alpha Chi Omega House at 7 p.m. 

ALPHA EPStLON RHO will meet In McCain 325 at 7 p.m. 

RHOMATES will meet at the Alpha Gamma Rho House at 
»prr>. 

ALPHA K APPA PS I will meet in Union 3OT at? p.m. 

KANSAS ASSOCIATION OF NURSING STUDENTS will 

meet in Union 103 at 7 p.m. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS will meet at 2:20 p.m. In 
Seaton before leaving on the Jeflreys Energy Center lour 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wtd., D«Ctmt»r 6, 1 978 



- Briefly 



By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 



Vereen appeals for Jackie Wilson fund 

NEW YORK— Actor Ben Vereen appealed to performing artists 
Tuesday to help a new medical trust fund for singer Jackie Wilson, 
who remains semi -comatose in a New Jersey nursing home. 

Vereen announced that he and four other men were starting the 
trust to raise funds to restore Wilson to "maximum health." 

Wilson, 44, suffered a heart attack Sept. 25, 1975, while performing 
in Cherry Hill, N.J. He has been a patient in a Medford, N.J., nur- 
sing home for Vfc years. 

During the late 1950s and early 1960s, Wilson's songs, including 
"Lonely Teardrops,""Alone at Last" and "To Be Loved," topped 
the popular music charts. 



Idaho find: Gem-quality 1,400-carat garnet 

CLARKIA, Idaho — An Orofino man says he has found a gem- 
quality almandite garnet that could be one of the 100 largest in the 
world. 

Mike Carrillo, 27, found a garnet that weighs more than 1,400 
carats and could be worth as much as $140,000, some experts say. 

Carrillo says he found the garnet in a creek near this North Idaho 
town, and he estimates it's worth at least $10,000. 

Carrillo says he has spent "thousands of hours" studying rocks, 
and hopes to find a star ruby the size of the garnet, estimating such 
a gem would be worth about $20 million. 



Students' royal flush turns into a fold 

BALTIMORE— Students at the College of Notre Dame who dealt 
the school a royal flush have wound up in hot water over their ef- 
forts to get a longer Christmas vacation. 

By Tuesday afternoon, about 20 students admitted taking part in a 
synchronized flush of all 68 toilets in Doyle Hall, a dormitory 
housing 100 women. 

The students said they hoped the protest would force the school to 
postpone midterm exams and thus hasten the start of Christmas 
vacation, both scheduled for the week ending Dec. 22. 

But apparently all the Sunday night action, dubbed "Operation 
Royal Flush," did was knock out the dorm's water supply until 
plumbing was repaired Monday afternoon. 

Sister Kathleen Feeley, the college president, said the Sunday 
night action failed to change the college's exam and vacation 
schedules. 




The right shoe for both feet. 




Flash 




Pelican 




Dusty 



Sunkei. Shoe* 



m nnu -mMiuii 



1 PRE CHRISTMAS 



Now— will it be super-sheer or no-run mesh? § SAVINGS SALE 

LMMiiuniKi /~»„i:* Dnnt.ihnoa mill ka ii7ni-n cruxn hi/ olanH ?' Wm M WW Ml 



SAN PASQUAL, Calif.— Pantyhose will be worn soon by eland 
antelopes, a rare breed in Senegal, West Africa. 

Curator Jim Dolan of the San Diego Wild Animal Park says an 
expedition will go to Senegal in February to capture the giant 
animals. 

The pantyhose, said Dolan, will be put on the antelopes to prevent 
abrasion in transit. He is asking women employees of the park to 
donate any they don't need. 



Fontana's trees: no more plastic Santas 

DETROIT— Shoes by Gucci. Fashions by Halston. Now there are 
Christmas trees by Fontana. 

Jeff Fontana hires out to affluent Detroit-area folks who pay him 
$300 to $1,000 to decorate their Yule trees. 

His only rules: no colored spotlights shining on aluminum trees 
and no plastic, revolving Santa Clauses. 

TU even decorate a plastic tree if it's in keeping with the look a 
client wants to achieve. You have to look at the house, talk with the 
people. Things have to balance." 

For the client trying to buy elegance, Fontana might remove 
some inner branches and twine silver garlands around the center of 
the tree. Pheasant plumes, gold sprays and satin bows go on the 
branch tips. 

"1 try not to overdo a tree," the decorator says. "But some of my 
clients go a little gaga at Christmas. One, he's an attorney, he's like 
an 8-year-old kid at Christmas. 

"He s got a plastic Santa with a button for a nose. You press the 
nose and Oriental voice says "Melly Clissmas." I've tried hiding 
that thing bust he insists on using it every year." 



Sweaters 

Selling Elsewhere $12-$24 




Blouses 

Selling Elsewhere $12-$ 17 

$ 5- $ 7 



Jeans 

Selling Elsewhere $ 15-120 




1 



Big Tops 

Selling Elsewhere $12-$ 14 




3015 Anderson Ave. 



Village Plaza 



¥ 



WeatFier 



Today will be cloudy, windy and colder with occasional snow 
flurries. Today's high will be in the low to mid 30s. Thursday will 
continue cloudy and cold, with a chance of snow; highs in the mid 

20S- 




Sunday 12:30-6:00 P.M. 
'f- Monday thru Friday 10:00 A.M. to 9.00 P.M., Sat. 10: A.M. to6: P.M. 



Opinions 



Drugs, anyone? 

A story in Tuesday's Collegian presented facts that readily lead to 
the conclusion that some of the doctors at the Lafene Student Health 
Center are handing out drug prescriptions with less than adequate 
precaution. 

Evidently, almost any student who wanders into Lafene with 
complaints of anxiety, tension, depression or other mental 
discomforts can walk out in short order with a prescription for 
tranquilizers, pain-killers or other symptom-treating drugs. 

Decisions to prescribe these drugs are made on the basis of the 
student's complaints— thorough examinations are rarely given and 
would probably be of little help in determining the validity of such 
complaints anyway. Although a review of the student's medical 
history may influence the prescribing of drugs at Lafene, it would 
be nearly impossible to obtain extensive medical histories of all 
incoming students. 

The possibility is very real that students exaggerate their 
problems to obtain drugs. EXWri if the problems are real, the easy 
accessibility of these drugs encourages students to rely on them as a 
panacea. It's so much easier to pop a pill, sit back and let the pain 
subside than to face the source of your problems. After all, our 
television sets have taught us since early childhood that all of life's 
little discomforts can and should be eradicated through the use of 
pills, syrups, nasal sprays, etc. 

This predilection for drug use coincides closely with the methods 
of the American medical profession. The manufacture and sale of 
drugs, be they necessary or not, are very profitable enterprises. 
The American consumer seems to have a neurotic eagerness to 
swallow anything the doctor prescribes him. It seems to make little 
difference that the safety and effectiveness of many drugs and non- 
prescription remedies have never been fully verified. 

Another disturbing point brought out in the story is that some of 
the doctors at Lafene don't always warn their patients about the 
dangers of mixing drugs or of driving under the influence of the 
medication. Such a lackadaisical approach to prescribing drugs, if 
indeed it is the rule rather than the exception at Lafene, indicates a 
serious need for upgrading the standards of practice at the clinic. 

SCOTT STUCKEY 
Assistant Editorial Editor 



Looking down on man 



"How tall are you?" "How's the weather 
up there? " "Why don't you saw off your legs 
and give some of your height to me?" "Do 
you play basketball?" 

These are the questions that try men's 
souls, when they happen to besix-and-a-half 



Kent Gaston 



feet tall. Especially when they don't play 
organized basketball anymore. 

It's sometimes disconcerting to know that 
my height is the main topic of those quick, 
do-nothing conversations and greetings on 
campus. 

It's even more disconcerting when this 
particular attribute is something I can't 
control and have done nothing to earn. 

But, whatever will be, will be, so permit 
me to answer some of the questions that 
have been asked and that people would like 
to ask. 

No, all big people are not dumb. We just 
sometimes a little sloe but most of us is able 
to usually keep up in class, you know, so I 
just don't think that argument holds no 
water. 

The weather is usually fine up here. Don't 
ask me that at Vista— I may just pour my 
Icee on your head and tell you it's snowing 

No, I don't play basketball. I did in high 
school. But, instead of playing small college, 



1 decided to take a crack at journalism at 
big K-State (What a waste of protoplasm, 
you're saying. All you need for journalism is 
typing fingers and some semblance of a 
brain). 

My most emphatic answer is to your silly 
question,"Why don't you give me some of 
your height?" 

I mean really, that's quite a sacrifice. 
Besides, I like it. And if your question is 
more in the form of "Why don't you get a 
little shorter and come down to our 
level?"— then you're really messed up. See, 
that Steve Martin record wasn't really 
factual; it was funny, comedy stuff. People 
don't really get small. 

Whew! I'm getting tired of jumping 
around from key to key typing this thing. 

And, of course, the "hi, shortie" greeting. 
1 don't think that one deserves much 
comment, because I can't counter with "hi, 
tall-ie. " It just doesn't have the ring to it. 

The only brief respite from the onslaught 
of dumb questions occurs when I go home. 
My dad is 6'5", my 22-year old brother is 
6'4", my 14-year old brother is about 6'2" 
< my jeans are blue and my shirt is vivid 
red). 

But, until all of the short people around me 
grow, or I shrink, I guess I'll have to endure. 
I think I'll begin my quest to feel more "in 
place" by standing around the basketball 
courts all day and singing "short people got 
no reason to live." 



*Se Collegian 



Wednesday. December*, W8 



*-^ iuspsmi »»> 



THE collegian is published by Student Publications. Inc.. Kiniw Stat* University, dally except Saturday, 
Sundays. Holidays and vacation periods 

OFFICES are in the north wins ot Kedtie Had, phone Ml 4S5S 

SECOND CLASS postage paid at Manhattan, Kansas MH1. 

SURICR I PT ION R AT ES : Si S, one calendar year, S7.S0. one semester 

THE COLLEGIAN functions in a legally autonomous relationship with the University and Is written and edited by 

students serving the University community. 

Paul Rhodes, Editor 
Terry Brungardt. Advertising. Manager 




Zonker's other roommate 



Hi! My name is Cort, and I am Zonkers 
other roomie. You remember him— he was 
the cat you read about last week in this same 
spot in the Collegian (or the Cow, as we refer 
to It in the basement of Kedzie Hall) . 

You see, I am a Collegian photographer, 
and we live in the basement. We are not as 



Cort Anderson 



bad as word people ( the rest of the Collegian 
staff) think we are. Why, Craig, Bo, Nancy, 
Sue, Scott, Dave, Pete and I can be 
downright human at times. The problem is, 
those times are few and far between. 

Many word people think photogs can't 
write their own names. But I am here to 
show you otherwise. We can write as well as 
anyone upstairs. 1 figure if they let an R2 
write a column about how tough it is to be an 
R2, then they would let a photog, who is 
lower than an R2 around here. 

Back to the fact I am Zenker's other 
roomie; I share the same trailer as Zonker 
and Jett. Now don't get me wrong, I really 
do like cats, but I am allergic to them. So Z, 
being the true feline he is, occasionally 
starts the eyes itching, the nose running and 
sets off a fit of sneezing which lasts a week 
or two. A couple of Contacts or A.R.M.s will 
do wonders. The problem is, they also put 



you to sleep faster than an Intro to 
Philosophy lecture. 

Most of the problem stems from the fact 
Zonker would rather sleep with me than 
Jett. Many of you might ask why 1 don't just 
close the door to my bedroom when I go to 
bed. Well, I can't because I sleep in the 
living room on the floor. 

Why do I sleep on the living room floor, 
you ask? The roof over my bed leaks and I 
am still waiting for my mattress to dry out 
from the last rain. I guess I can't complain 
too much because 1 only owe three months 
back rent . 

I can live with the fact I am allergic to 
"good 'ole Z," but I can't live with a cat that 
prowls the dirty dishes at five in the mor- 
ning looking for a snack. This, too, would be 
acceptable if he could do it quietly, but 
Zonker is clumsy and is constantly knocking 
over a pot or a pan, making more noise than 
a tornado test whistle. 

I guess if 1 absolutely had to, I could live 
with the noise. But, Zonker's real class act is 
to leave little surprises hidden around the 
trailer. First you smell it, then you go 
looking for it, and eventually you find it— a 
small brown pile hidden behind the chair or 
between the big pillow and the wall. The 
only answer is to try and pick it up and douse 
the area with half a can of Lysol. 

Last, but by no means least, is Ann and 
I... but, hey. That's another story altogether. 



Letters 



Fired-up 
over the 'Cats 



Editor, 

Re: Heather Spence's letter, "Cool it, 
Willie." 

As a band member, I apologize for our 
actions. We as a group do get carried away 
in our loyal support of the basketball team. 
You might find that here in America, we 
have a very curious habit of supporting our 



Goin' wrong 

Editor, 

I was really disgusted after seeing "Goin' 
South." U was a fairly average movie, until 
the scene where the "hero" ties his wife to 
the bedposts and rapes her after she refuses 
to have sex with him. 

What is really incredible is that in the 
movie, she becomes his adoring, submissive 
wife thereafter. Is the normal relationship 
between men and women supposed to be 
sadistic-masochistic? 

I think it's really sad that movies such as 
this glamorize unequal and even cruel 
relationships, leading men and women to 
believe that is what women want, and 
women to believe that is what they should 
expect. 

If any of you guys think rape is the way to 
a woman's heart, please think again. 

Barbara Wherry 
freshman in elementary education 



college teams. We yell, scream and jump up 
and down. (Yes, even wave our arms oc- 
casionally.) 

I'm sure I speak for Willie in stating that 
we really don't care about how they do it 
overseas, but we do give a hoot about how 
we fire up our team here at K-State. For a 
school that has won the Big 8 sportsmanship 
award as many years as we have, I don't 
think you have a leg to stand on. 

Again, we as a group are sorry for our 
"very poor taste" in cheering. Maybe we 
should confine ourselves to toe tapping, 
finger snapping and, if we get carried away, 
loud eye blinking. 

Rodney Funk 
senior in community services 



Wanting doctors 9 time 



Editor, 

I feel you have irresponsibly used Lafene 
Health Center for purposes of "investigative 
reporting." Valuable doctors' time has been 
wasted in securing the information which 
serves as the basis of Julie Doll's article. 

My thanks and support goes to the staff of 
Lafene for the many students they have 
helped. 

Jacob Slonim 
graduate student in computer science 






( 



1 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wed, Decembers. 1978 



Letters 



EAC stalled by hard times 



! 



Editor. 

Re: Luke Brown's column, "Junking 
America." 

The Environmental Awareness Center 
(EAC) would like to correct some 
misconceptions created by your column. 
The EAC is a volunteer organization that 
receives no funding from any source, except 
what money we raise ourselves. 

Our goals are to provide a resource center 
of environmental information and to be a 
focal point for environmental activism at K 
State. We run recycling programs to 
establish interest in recycling and to provide 
funding for our organization. We must cope 
with the realities of extremely limited time 
and manpower. Therefore, we must pick 
those areas where we can put these 
resources to work most efficiently. 

We have run a program of recycling high 
quality bond paper continuously for about 
four years. We have worked periodically on 
recycling newspaper, but we have found 
newspaper recycling to be a risky, time- 
consuming venture in which we have often 
lost money. 

Here are the facts on the newsprint 
business in Manhattan; Last spring the EAC 
attempted a campus-wide program with 
pickup points which included the library, 
residence halls, the Union and the printing 
service. The coordinator of this project often 
spent 20 hours a week working on it, and 
many others spent a great deal of time and 
effort working. 

We were rewarded by seeing the price of 
newsprint drop from $40 per ton to $20, and 
then we couldn't find a local buyer at all. We 
notified our pickup points we could no 
longer afford to recycle. We ended the 
semester by being given much less than 
promised in payment for the newsprint by 
the buyer. 

This semester we are short on volunteers, 
in poor financial condition with no local 
buyer, no storage space and no tran- 
sportation. Having been caught holding tons 
of unsaleable paper before, we put the 
program on hold. This temporary measure 
was, unfortunately, the only solution to 
these problems. 

And yes, as you ask in your column, we 
have either investigated or run programs of 
recycling glass and aluminium. We have 
found that it is not a profitable way to spend 






PfV I u 





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D.$490 E. $356 

425 POVNTZ MANHATTAN, KANSAS 



our resources. But this is not to say we 
couldn't run such programs or get 
newspaper recycling going again. 

What we need is more people to put in 
hours working on these programs. When I 
read your column, I assumed that we were 
lucky enough to have found one such person 
in you, but my hopes were dashed when 
upon calling you I found no willingness on 
your part to back up your words with action. 

You are welcome to come over and help 
work on political issues, as is anyone else, 
whether it be a returnable bottle bill (which 
we have supported from our inception) or 
expressing concern about nuclear war or 
whales. We have done everything from 
cleaning up local areas (and winning an 
award for doing so) to helping lobby on 
national issues. 

You are right, though, in one sense: we 
want and need to do more. But the way 
things get done is not to sit back and criticize 
those who are woking. Rather, it's pitching 
in and helping to get the work done. 

Members of the EAC 



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• KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wed., Decembers, 1978 

Willard Hall's fumes 

cause nausea, delays 



By LUKE BROWN 
Collegian Reporter 

Leaking pipes, exhaust hoods which don't 
work and overcrowded conditions are 
among problems plaguing the chemistry 
and biochemistry departments in Willard 
Hall and causing the departments to seek a 
new building. 

"The chemistry in 1938 (when Willard was 
built) is different than the chemistry in 
1978," William Fateley, head of the 
chemistry department, said. "Our hood 
situation, which was adequate in '38, is not 
adequate now. 

"It is impossible to build a hood situation 
into here that would remove the vapors that 
need to be removed." Fateley continued. 

In several laboratories, a check by the 
Collegian found that the hoods— which are 
designed to suck air containing chemical 
vapors out of laboratories— either don't 
work, work inadequately or do the opposite 
of what they are supposed to do. 

In one laboratory, a test with a smoke 
bomb showed none Of the hoods worked. In 
another lab, the hood can vent exhaust into 
the lab on the floor above it . 

FATELEY said he smelled cyanide gas in 
the hall a couple of days ago, and could not 
find where it came from. Fateley said he 
didn't think enough toxic gas could ac- 
cumulate to cause death. 

"I don't think that, with the gasses we 
have, we could kill anybody. We could make 



some people sick for a day or two, but there 
would be nothing more serious," Fateley 
said. . 

Other instructors agreed with Fateley. 

"People have gotten nauseous during 
some experiments and many of those ex- 
periments have been stopped. It is not a 
common problem but an occasional one," 
David Cox, head of the biochemistry 
department, said. 

Joe Paukstelis, associate professor of 
chemistry, said students sometimes faint or 
become ill. He said classes had been driven 
from laboratories because of the fumes. 

Fateley said the fumes also posed a 
problem for wearers of contact lenses. The 
manufacturers caution contact lens wearers 
not to come into contact with toxic fumes, 
and Fateley said he had issued warnings, 
although he didn't know what would happen 
if the lenses would come into contact with 
the fumes. 

In addition, some of the chemicals are 
suspected of causing cancer. The problem is 
not so much for short-term students who 
aren't in the labs very long, but with 
graduate students and instructors who are 
in the labs from six to eight hours each day, 
Fately said. 

"My own life may have been shortened 20 
years, who knows?" Fateley said. 

"Chemistry, in some ways unavoidable to 

us, is a dangerous field. We've been very 

lucky; we've not had anything dangerous 

(see WILLARD. p. 7) 



'Haphazard' long-range 
committee sees change 



(continued from p. 1) 

stamp committee," Hollingberger said. 
"We would bring up questions, and it seems 
like we would always be told it was either 
too early or too late to change anything." 

"It seemed like we could never hit on the 
right moment," Gibson said. 

Young said part of the frustrations the 
committee members experienced were built 
into the system because many buildings 
take as long as eight years to plan, and few 
members are on the committee long enough 
to follow those projects through to com- 
pletion. 

Several of the committee members said 
they should have been able to make 
recommendations on projects if they had 
had information about them at the right 
times. 

YOUNG, who set the agendas, said the 
members received information and con- 
sidered the projects at the right time to 
implement changes. 

"It appears to me as if we have a very 
haphazard approach to long-range plan- 
ning," said Sam Brownback, student body 
president and member of the committee. 

Some of the members said it wouldn't 
have made much difference if they had 
worked on the projects in time to change 
things; the committee's recommendation 
might still have been ignored. 

"There should have been and there were 



some major decisions made," Gibson said. 
"However, it seems like the. administrators 
with the real power had already made up 
their minds and simply weren't very open to 
change." 

However, some members say a change for 
the better is insight. 

Paul Young has been replaced as chair- 
man of the committee by Gene Cross and 
University Facilities has acquired Campus 
Landscape Architectural Planner Larry 
Wilson. 

"In the first couple of meetings we have 
had, we have someone doing the work in a 
professional manner," said Bernd Foerster, 
dean of the College of Architecture and 
Design and committee member. 

"Right now, with Gene Cross, things may 
improve some," said Bob Smith, faculty 
member who is the liason to the committee 
from the Traffic and Parking Council. 

SMITH said he had "tremendous respect" 
for Wilson, and believed "we need to give 
the new people a chance. ' ' 

Cross said he was considering changes on 
the committee and might cut the mem- 
bership, which now totals 16. 

"Right now, it is a bit premature for me to 
say exactly what changes will be made," 
Cross said. 

"I do feel that the long-range planning 
committee has a very responsible role to 
play," Cross said. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wod, December 6, 1978 




SMOKE GETS IN YOUR 

EYES.. .Alan Goldstein, senior in 
pre- veterinary medicine, and Joe 
Paukstelis, professor of chemistry, 
ignite a smoke bomb Tuesday 
afternoon to demonstrate one of 
Willard Hall's defective ventilation 
hoods. 

Slatt photo by Dave Kaup 



Willard Hall: flooding 
utilities plague staff 



{continued from p. 6) 
happen with our students but it's not 
something that might not happen any one 
(lay," Kateley said. 

THE OVERCROWDED conditions create 
another problem with Willard Hall. 

The biochemistry department has offices 
in Leasure Hall and will put some more in 
Burt Hall. Cox sees this as possibly partially 
isolating students and faculty. It also is seen 
as a handicap in attracting new teachers. 

Utilities are another concern for the 
teachers and staff. 

"Most of the utilities are buried in walls, 
so if something goes wrong or if you want to 
change the function of the room, which you 
are bound to want to do, it turns out to be a 
rather sizable job," Cox said. 

Cox also said the building doesn't have 
enough electricity to meet its needs, 
although Fateley said there was enough. 

Water adds to the problems of Willard 
Halt in several ways. 

Cox complained of "very frequent 
Hooding problems" which "happen to affect 
biochemistry much more than it affects 
chemistry because we are downstairs." 

Pointing to an approximately seven-inch 
hole above his desk. Cox said a stream of 
water had come through it. He said it had 
not caused any damage to his desk because 
it had happened when he was there and he 
was able to contain it. 

"There are occasions when getting your 
desk wet is a major disaster, or getting a 
piece of equipment wet," Cox said. 

A leak from the still on the fourth floor 
caused damage to ceilings, floors and of- 
fices on all floors in March. 

Fately said fire is not seen as a problem in 
Willard Hall because it is contructed of 
concrete. 

"The orginal chemistry building burned, 
and that's why (we have) Willard Hall, and I 
think Ihey learned their lesson from that," 
Fateley said. 

TO COMBAT flash fires caused by solvent 
tires in the laboratories, all of the tabs have 
fire blankets and fire extinguishers, as well 
as two exits, 

Cox said he is more concerned about 
Leasure Hall burning than he is about a fire 
in Willard Hall. 

"We worry a great deal about fire in that 
building," Cox said He said the people in 
the biochemistry department in Leasure 



ARTS and CRAFTS FAIR 

Dec. 6, 7 and 8 

K.S.U. BALLROOM 

10-4 p.m. 




Hall would have to crawl out through a 
w i ndow onto the roof of a shed . 

"There would be a very little chance to 
save any material or equipment," Cox said. 

Willard Hall does not have a central fire 
alarm system or a sprinkler system. 

Everyone interviewed said Willard Hall 
should be renovated rather than torn down. 

"This building is one of the best buildings 
on campus. This building can be renovated 
for, I think, anything outside of chemical or 
biochemical laboratories. It's great for 
office space or lectures. You know, these big 
labs could be taken out and made into lec- 
ture rooms," Fateley said. 

One reason the departments give for 
needing a new building is that it would at- 
tract teachers and grants. 

"We'll have a lot more opportunities as 
we're reaching retirements of 
people... about the time the building would 
be coming up. Our opportunity of hiring 
really bright young scientists would really 
be Improved. Also, it helps in getting 
government grants. A new building shows 
that the state has condfidence in that 
program, and the government likes to see 
that. "Fateley said. 



FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES' 



Interested persons are invited to share in beginning a new 
F.C.A, Chapter. 

On Friday, December 8, 1978 at 6:30 p.m. an F.C.A. supper at 
The First Presbyterian Church, 8th & Leavenworth. 
For reservation please call 537-05 18. 



LET'S TALK ABOUT... 

TURMOIL IN IRAN 

with 
Dr. Burton Kaufman 

KSU Dept. of History 
12:30 P.M. 

Wed., Dec. 6 

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• KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wd.,D«cemt>f e, 1978 

FCC ruling presses KSDB 



KSDB FM (Radio 88), K-State's campus 
radio station, will have to undergo some 
changes in the future because of a law 
passed by the Federal Communications 
Commission last summer. 

The FCC law bans 10-watt radio stations. 
KSDB, which is a 10-watt station, has three 
alternatives to choose from, according to 
Tom Tuck wood, KSDB manager. 

The first alternative, Tuck wood said, is to 
move from 88 to 87.9 on the radio dial. He 
said radio receivers don't pick up stations 
well from this location on the dial but 
because of the ban, KSDB would have to 
change bands. 

The second alternative is to put KSDB on a 
commerical band and the third alternative 
is to increase KSDB's power to at least 100 
watts, Tuckwood said. 

There would be no cost involved in the 
first two alternatives, he said, but the 
audience would be at a disadvantage 
because KSDB would be difficult to find on 
the dial. 

The cost of increasing KSDB's power to at 
least 100 watts would range from $10,000 to 



$40,000, he said. The cost would depend upon 
factors such as whether KSDB would 
change to stereo. 

The proposed alternative KSDB selects 
must be sent to the FCC by Feb. 1, I960. 
Tuckwood said KSDB will start on the 
proposal in January. 

"We are trying to determine what is best 
for us,'* Tuckwood said. "We are looking 
strongly at a power increase." 

Tuckwood said KSDB is looking at a lot of 
sources for funding, but most of the funding 
will come from the Department of Jour- 
nalism and Mass Communications. 

"In the past, the journalism department 
has spent a lot on TV, but not much on 
radio," Tuckwood said. 

Besides selecting one of the alternatives, 
Tuckwood said KSDB will have to make 
other changes. 

"Along with the power increase, if we 
choose this alternative, we would keep a 
closer eye on the type and form of 
programming we put out and be more aware 
of programming quality," Tuckwood said. 
"Any changes KSDB makes will be for the 
better." 



'Badlands' combines everyday life 
with a surrealistic background 



By DEBBIE RHEIN 
Staff Writer 

"Badlands" grabs at you like a Salvador 
Dali painting; surrealistic with a 
background sense of time ticking eerily 
away. 

The plot is simple: 15-year-old Holly falls 
in love with garbage collector Kit. Widower 



Colle gian Review 



father disapproves and forbids the couple to 
see each other. 

Kit decides he doesn't want to be 
separated from Holly and goes to her house 
and starts packing her clothes. Father 
walks in and starts provoking Kit, who then 
shoots father. The couple hide the body, 
burn the house down and set off on their 
escape, knowing somehow it is all futile. 

They build a home in the forest, and live a 
Robinson-Crusoe existence until bounty 
hunters find them. Kit shoots them down 
and the couple sets off on a murder-crazy 
spree. 

I don't say trigger-happy, because there 
doesn't seem to be any pleasure in this 
movie. 

They just seem to do things: kill people in 
a matter-of-fact way and continue with their 
daily lives. 

It is this quality which contributes to the 
unreal mood of the film. They are 
surrounded with all of the everyday signs of 
life; Holly even wears curlers in her hair, 
and yet they are capable of such shocking 
acts. 

There is a particularly shocking scene 
where Kit has just shot a man. Holly calmly 
walks in and asks the dying man whether or 
not his spider bites. This complete disregard 
for any human emotion provides the surreal 
atmosphere. 

Sissy Spacek as Holly is an example of 
perfect casting. The horrifying events 
related in that soft, Southern, matter-of-fact 
voice, complement the innocent little-girl- 
look Spacek wears, 



Martin Sheen does an excellent protrayal 
of Kit, whose mind you never glimpse. What 
makes him that way— why he does such 
things— are all questions which remain 
unanswered. 

The closest answer is the couple does 
things because they're there. 

This is a movie which truly defies 
description, leaving you with an empty 
emotional void as you walk out. 

Trial delayed 
in sub plot case 

ST. LOUIS (API— The trial of two men 
charged with conspiring to steal a U.S. 
nuclear submarine from its base at Groton, 
Conn., was postponed indefinitely Tuesday. 

U.S. District Judge James Meredith said 
he had another case ahead of the trial, but 
that he also understood government 
prosecutors might seek amended in- 
dictments against the men. 

The trial was scheduled to begin Monday, 
but was postponed until Wednesday because 
of a crowded court docket. Meredith said he 
did not know when the trial might start. 

Edward J. Mendenhall, 24, of St. Louis 
County, and James W. Cosgrove, 26, of Ovid, 
N.Y., were indicted Nov. 2 on the conspiracy 
charge. The government dropped charges 
against a third man, Kurtis J. Schmidt of St. 
Louis County. 

Mendenhall and Cosgrove are accused of 
plotting to steal the USS Trepang from its 
base, kill its crew, sink a submarine tender 
and sell the stolen sub to an unspecified 
buyer in midocean. 

However, MendenhalTs attorney, Donald 
Wolff contends the defendants never in- 
tended to go through with the plot. He said 
they plotted to fleece up to $300,000 in front 
money from the buyer, a man they believed 
linked with organized crime. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wad., Docambar 6, 1978 



Regulations, cuts in funding 
hurt University research 



By SANDY KOELSCH 
Collegian Reporter 

Federal expenditures for basic research 
have declined by 15 percent from- 1968 to 
1976; these declines, plus increases in 
federal research regulations have cost the 
nation's universities both time and money. 

K State president Duane Acker said 
faculties must spend many hours to meet 
federally-mandated compliances. This is 

Japanese know 
their onions 

By The Associated Press 

It's enough to bring tears to your eyes! 
The Japanese are buying up America's 
onions. 

Not all of our onions, of course. The big 
demand seems to be for the Spanish-style 
onions— the ones some people erroneously 
call Bermuda onions. No one knows exactly 
why; it could be an increased taste for 
hamburgers. There also are reports that the 
Japanese onions were smaller than usual 
this year. 

Idaho and Oregon are the biggest 
producers of the big, Spanish style slicing 
onions. Last October and November, they 
shipped 4.6 million pounds of onions to 
Japan. This year, in the same two months, 
unofficial figures show shipments of 43.7 
million pounds. 

Prices, meanwhile, are up. "Rather 
dramatically, '* said a U.S. Department of 
Agriculture spokesman who asked not to be 
identified by name. A 50-pound sack of 
Spanish-style onions with a minimum 
diameter of three inches sold for $3.50 at 
Idaho and Oregon shipping points in the first 
half of November. By the end of the month, 
(he same sack was going for $6. 

"That is a very high price for onions. No 
question about it," said the USDA 
spokesman. 

Adding to the problem is a disease that 
has struck the onions in storage, meaning 
many of them must be culled out. "We can't 
put our finger on what we call the cullage, 
but it reportedly is running very heavy," the 
agriculture spokesman said. 

It should be pointed out that there is no 
shortage of onions. The storage 
crop— onions of all kinds on hand throughout 
the country for marketing during the 
coming months— stands at 18.2 million 
hundredweight, up 5 percent from last year. 
The storage crop of Spanish-style onions in 
the West is almost as large as last year's. 



the time they would otherwise be using to 
work on their projects. 

Acker spoke Tuesday in the K -State Union 
to a joint luncheon of agriculture and 
engineering experiment station staff and 
faculty members on the topic of basic 
research. 

According to Acker, half the basic 
research being done today is carried out at 
the university level. 

However, he said that it is difficult to sell 
basic research to society. This is because 
most Americans want to see immediate 
results from their spendings. 

This attitude is reflected by the govern- 
ment's cut in expenditures for basic 
research, Acker said. 

"The federal government must remain a 
principle patron of university research," he 
said. 

Along with cuts in federal funding, federal 
regulations have cost the universities time 
and money. Acker said. 

As an example, Acker said that requiring 
the use of consent forms when working with 
human subjects has affected research 
programs. Otherwise-willing subjects often 
turn away from a program when asked to 
sign a consent form, he said. 

Acker said he believes some of the initial 
federal regulations were needed, but ex- 
panded regulations seem to go too far. 

K-State wants efficiency, Acker said. But 
he said it is hard for officials in Washington, 
D.C. to correctly tell universities how to best 
organize their programs. 

Acker proposed an increase in the use of 
funds from the National Institute of Health 
and the National Science Foundation to help 
out university research programs. 

Each year, K-Slate receives about $80,000 
from the National Science Foundation and 
$40,000 from the National Institute of Health. 
This money is used for exploration, for seed 
money for new ideas and for updating 
campus equipment. 

Also, Acker suggested that a program of 
partial deregulation of funds be im- 
plemented to help college researchers. 

HE SAID THIS would enable universities 
to distribute funds more evenly, give less 
stop-and-go funding, and give the resear- 
chers more time to spend working with their 
projects. 

It is important to recognize that good 
basic research requires stability and long- 
term commitment, Acker said. He said the 
feasibility of a research program may not 
be immediately recognized by the public. 




6t6 N . 12th 



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10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, w«d., D**mb«r6. 1978 




TV's Cronkite to get back into print 



CAMDEN, Maine (AP>— CBS Evening 
News anchorman Walter Cronkite is going 
to go back to print journalism. Cronkite has 
become part owner of the Camden Herald, a 
weekly newspaper in this tourif' haven 
along the Maine coast. 

"I see a great economic future for the 
coastal area, and I am delighted to be a 
small part of the Camden Herald," said 



Cronkite, who owns a 43-foot yawl which he 
frequently sails on Penobscot Bay. 

Publisher W. Douglas Hall sold the 
newspaper last week for an undisclosed 
sum. The new majority owner is Whitney 
Communications Corp, of New York City, 
with Cronkite and editor James Martin 
each holding a 10 percent interest. 



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The Hilton Inn Supports the K-Slate Wildcats! 



Squirreling around 



Stall photo by Pete Souto 



A squirrel takes a lunch break on a tree north of Willard Hall. 



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The givc-a- book' certificate is a new promotion 
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These certificates are redeemable for books at 
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KANSAS STATE COLLECMAN, Wad M D#c«fflbf 6, 1 ffl 



11 



Overdue for facelift 



naue tor jaceiin 

Centuries of sun, sandstorms ravage Sphinx 

WW! , - JL. II- neck could power of the king and face bearing his sands. It was last cleared from 



CAIRO, Egypt iAP)-The lion's body of 
the Sphinx is firm, but the human face of the 
majestic monument is showing the effects of 
5,000 years of howling sandstorms, scor- 
ching desert days and chilling nights. 

Its seven-foot nose has been missing for 
centuries. The left eye is sagging and the 
entire left side of the 13-foot face is distor- 
ted 

"The Sphinx is sick," the daily newspaper 
Al Akhbar reports. "It's suffering from 
acute anemia. Unless the right medication 

Searchers find 
21 survivors in 
Colorado crash 

WALDEN, Colo. (AP) -Searchers on 
snowmobiles resued 21 persons Tuesday, 
including an infant in his mother's arms, 
who survived the crash-landing of a twin- 
engine commuter plane on a mountainside 
and spent the night in a near-blizzard. 
Authorities said one person died in the ac- 
cident. 

The survivors were taken out from the 
crash site 10,000 feet up in the Colorado 
Rockies on Sno-Cats through a foot of fresh 
snow, some riding inside and others 
wrapped in down sleeping bags and 
strapped to the outside of the tractor-like, 
tracked vehicles. 

Only four survivors were able to walK 
unaided when they reached a rescue center 
set up in remote log cabin. The others were 
carried in baskets and on plywood boards^ 

Kocky Mountain Airways Flight 217 had 
left the ski-resort town of Steamboat Springs 
at 6:55 p.m. Monday on a scheduled 45- 
minute flight over the Continental Divide to 
Denver Fifteen minutes later, the pilot 
radioed that he was having trouble with ice 
and was heading back to Steamboat 

Springs. . ,. 

Vern Bell, 19, of Lakewood, one of the 
* passengers, said the plane had been in the 
air about an hour and there was no warning 
before the crash. 

"All of a sudden we hit a little turbulence 
and ran right into the ground," said Bell. 

It was about 6 a.m Tuesday when the first 
rescue crew, following the signal from an 
emergency locator transmitter on 
snowmobiles, reached the crash site south- 
west of Walden 



To serve with 
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$4.10. The matching dated mug, 
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and treatment is applied, the neck could 
give in to begin with." 

But the method of treating the time- 
honored patient sharply divides art and 
restoration experts so proud of the aging 
wonder just outside Cairo, near the 
Pyramids at Giza. 

It's been five years since the Sphinx 
received a facelift-an "injection" of 
barium pigments to strengthen the area 
from the neck up. 

"It badly needs another shot, said tarn 
Hawass, inspector of the pyramids section 
of Egypt's antiquities department. "The 
outer layer is peeling off all over." 

BUT ANOTHER expert, Ahmed Saleh, the 
department's director of research and 
restoration, advocates building a "wind- 
shield" around the 65-foot-high unprotected 
monument. 

"It needs trees around it to protect against 
sandstorms," he told Al Akhbar "Those 
sand particles become a cyclone-they hit 
the Sphinx on the face, drop to the feet and 
the wind lifts them up again in a continuous 
cyclical motion." 

Saleh said the proud monument s latest 
ailment is a recently noted unevenness in 
the water table underneath it. Some experts 
fear this may cause it to lose its balance. 

Although the Sphinx looks as solid as a 
five-millenium-old sculptural marvel can, 
Al Akhbar kicked off a public campaign for 
urgent measures to protect one of Egypt's 
prime attractions. "Speak up to authorities 
for restoration, ' ' the paper appealed. 

The latest problems are only an episode in 
the turbulent history of the monument. 



power of 
features. 

Because it faced the rising sun, it was 
considered a sun god and later acquired the 
name Abou El-ho), the father of terror. 

Over the centuries, the Sphinx often had 
trouble keeping its head above the shifting 




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KING KHEPHREN, the builder of the 
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length, the lion's body representing the 



(iTfflk-State union 

|V^J upc issues & ideas 



sands. It was last cleared from the dunes 
only 40 years ago. 

Its nose was damaged centuries ago. One 
legend says Napoleon had it lopped off to 
display French supremacy after he landed 
in Egypt in 1798. 



BADLANDS 

STARRING 

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7 P.M. WED., 

Dec. 6 
K-State Union 
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Admission *1 

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Design Dept. or PDP 

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12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«d. ( D»c.mb«r 8, 1 978 



Anything you want to know, ULN has the answer 



By RICH CURRY 

Collegian Reporter 

Two old, comfortable-looking couches in 
back and an assortment of plants about the 
room present a calm, deceiving appearance 
in contrast to the constant and almost 
electric excitement felt in the air. 

At the first glance, the University Lear- 
ning Network (ULN) office appears to be 
like any other office on campus. 

But the excitement is there and quite real. 
It's reflected in the faces of each ULN staff 
member. It's an excitement of doing 
something worthwhile; of helping others. 

An oversimplification of the ULN is: they 
provide answers. Providing those answers, 
however, is another matter. 

The walls of the ULN office are lined with 
books, encyclopedias, almanacs, bulletin 
boards, newspapers and reference files 
telling where to call to answer a question. 

ULN staffers man two incoming phone 
lines which operate on a rotating basis off a 
single number (532-6442). A third phone line 
is kept open in reserve to call for help in 
finding an answer while the questioning 
party is waiting. 

THERE ARE 19 categories of questions 
most frequently asked of ULN staffers. 
They range from requesting information on 
the academic institution, babysitters, 
campus services, financial aid, law, 
locating people, movies, plants, politics, 
sports, trivia, tutors, and weather to zip 
codes. 

The ULN came into existence in 1970 
through the work of Joe DeOrdio, faculty 
member on the staff of the Center for 
Student Development, After presenting his 
plan for a student-operated information and 
assistance center, the Student Governing 
Association voted to fund the project. 

A part of the Center for Student 
Development, the ULN is currently under 

Agents fired 
in illegal spying 
of Weathermen 

WASHINGTON (AP)-FBl Director 
William Webster said Tuesday he will 
fire two FBI agents for their part in con- 
ducting allegedly illegal surveillance 
against the radical Weather Underground in 
the early 1970's, but will take no action 
against 59 other agents. 

In addition to firing two agents, the 
director announced he will demote one 
agent and suspend one for 30 days. 

He also said he will reprimand two street 
agents who conducted unauthorized sur- 
veillance against the Weather Underground. 

Webster said he decided against any 
discipline for 59 other agents, including one 
supervisor, on grounds they were acting 
under orders from superiors and without 
clear legal guidance from FBI headquarters 
or the Justice Department 

"It seems clear to me that to discipline the 
street agents at this late date for acts per- 
formed under supervision and without 
needed legal guidance from FBI 
headquaters and the Department of Justice 
would wholly lack any therapeutic value 
either as a personal deterrent or as an 
example to others," Webster told a news 
conference. "It would be counterproductive 
and unfair." 

Webster announced the results of an in- 
vestigation of 68 agents and supervisors 
accused of involvement in breakins, 
wiretaps and mail openings that were in- 
tended to ferret out Weather Underground 
fugitives between 1970 and 1975. 



ATTENTION 

VETERANS and 
DEPENDENTS 

STOP BY THE 

OFFICE OF VETERANS' 

AFFAIRS TO COMPLETE 

YOUR SPRING 

ENROLLMENT 

INFORMATION FORM 



the direction of Pat Bosco, assistant dean of 
students. The staff consists of Brad Bran- 
son, coordinator; Paula Elliot, assistant 
coordinator; five work -study students and 
approximately 25 student volunteers. 

As assistant coordinator, Elliot is directly 
involved in supervising the ULN staff. 

"We are constantly looking for ways to 
streamline our system because we aren't as 
categorized as any full-fledged library We 
try to keep our resources organized in a way 
where we know where they are. A lot of what 
I do is to train staffers in what is here in the 
office and how to use it." she said. 

THE ULN staff maintains a record of calls 
received, Branson said. According to these 
records; ULN received 27,813 calls and 1,352 
walk ins during the 1976-77 school year and 
33,142 calls and 1,354 walk-ins in 1977-78, a 19 
percent increase. 

In fact, during October of this semester 
ULN answered 7,855 questions. 

"This is the highest number of calls we've 
ever received in any month and in some 
semesters, during the last eight years," 
Branson said. 

The top questions asked during that month 
concerned student locations, campus ser- 
vices and department information, faculty 
location and academic information. 

In talking about how 30 persons handle 
such a volume of calls, Elliot said, "It's 
based largely, I guess, on the principle of 
synergy (using the combined knowledge of 
the staff to solve a problem >." 

"Because this is a network, we are able to 
help one another out. We're constantly not 
only in touch with each other here in the 
office to find out how much they know, but 
also using the services of the University and 
the community. We rely heavily on the 
academic departments to help us answer 
our questions " 

WHEN ASKED if such a volume of calls 
ever gets to be too much, Allison Dollar, a 
ULN staffer, said, "Only when you're 
working alone in the office. " 

Elliot compared such times to the job of a 
switchboard operator. 

"If there 're not two people working when 
both phones ring, you pick up the phone, tell 
them to hold and answer the other line. It 
gets hectic, but I don't think you could call it 
too much, "she said. 

Elliot said the ULN succeeds because of 
the enthusiasm and dedication of the staff. 

"This is not an easy job. The work here is 
a mix between the very querulous and very 
helpful. These traits are what makes a 
successful ULN staffer. This is also what 
keeps staffers coming back," she said. 

Working as a ULN staff member also 
provides a sense of satisfaction, Bob Elliot, 
ULN staffer, said, 

"I get satisfaction when I can answer a 
question without having to look up the an- 
swer, "he said. 



ELLIOT SAID ULN is always interested 
in gaining new volunteers who possess an 
enthusiasm to help others know things. 

According to ULN records, 476 of the 
phone calls received through Oct. 31 this 
year were trivia questions. 

"We do get some really academically- 
inclined questions and on the other hand we 
get, 'Where can I get a bag of chicken 
feathers?' 

"Learning is an exchange of knowledge. It 
doesn't always have to do with sitting and 
cramming for an exam. Learning is finding 
things out that are important to oneself. 

"I can't think of any trivia questions we 
haven't answered. And yet, I don't consider 
our primary function as continuing to be 
stumped by trivia," Elliot said. 

Among some of the trivia questions asked 
recently was, "How many tiles are there on 
the Union floor?" In response to that one, 
Elliot said she sent a ULN member over to 
count them. Another question asked 
whether or not sap of an arrowhead plant 
was poisonous. 

"I once got a question about when the 



buzzards return to Hinkley, Ohio," Allison 
said. 

"I didn't know there were any buzzards in 
Ohio," Elliot said. 




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THE TALL 
WITH ONE 



BLOND MAX 
BLACK SHOE 






Bugging, break-ins and 
Watergate-style shenanigans 
are the objects of timely satire in 
this hilarious farce A young 
violinist unknowingly becomes 
the decoy in a cut-throat battle 
between political spies They 
turn his life into total mayhem; 
but through it all the tall blond 
man remains a naive and 
lovable modem day Buster 
Keaton narrowly escaping pent 
at every turn. 





"The kind of story that might 
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ABC-TV 

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it's so crammed with funny 
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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W»d.,D»c«mtm6,197B 



IS 



Separation leads to marriage of Nancy, voters 



WICHITA (AP)-Nancy Landon 
Kassebaum says her place as a woman 
would still be in the home, rather than the 
U.S. Senate, had she and her husband not 
separated. 

When she and Phil Kassebaum, an at- 
torney and businessman, decided to 
separate three years ago, it was not a result 
of any desire to break out and become her 
own person, she said in an interview. 

But although she won't say what caused 
the split— "it was really something that's 
hard to explain"— Kassebaum believes it 
was partially responsible for giving her a 
taste of Washington politics that later led 
her to run for the Senate. 

Had she and her husband been together 
when a year ago Sen. James Pearson (R- 
Kan.) announced he would retire, the 



Republican senator-elect said, Kansas 
would not have its first woman senator. 

"Sen. Pearson made his decision and I 
was from this area of the state and it was a 
good time for a woman and the children 
were at a point where I felt I could be gone 
and my own marital status had changed," 
she said. 

"Otherwise, I would not have been able to 
participate— because 1 would not have left 
home to go off on my own career. As I've 
said, my first priorities were family and 
they still are, really, but they've changed so 
that I feel I can utilize interests I've always 
had." 

THE 46- YEAR-OLD Kassebaum has 
gained as much attention in becoming the 
first woman elected to the Senate without 
following her husband to Congress, as she 



Tightened gas supply 
squeezes fuel prices 



NEW YORK (AP) -Motorists will be 
paying a couple of cents more tor a gallon of 
gasoline within a week because of the 
current tight supply of the fuel, industry 
analysts predicted Tuesday. 

"Before next week is out, you will 
probably see a 2 or 3-cent increase in most 
markets," Dan Lundberg, publisher of the 
Lundberg Letter, an influential industry 
newsletter, said. "This won't take place in 
specific areas, it will take place on a 
national level— and especially in rural 
areas." 

"There's no question the shortage is going 
to bring some increase," said Charles 
Matties, a West Hartford. Conn., Exxon 
dealer who is president of the National 
Congress of Petroleum Retailers. "I would 
expect to see a few cents' upward 
movement." 

The increase is expected to last as long as 
#> there is tightness in supply. The oil com- 
panies estimate that the tight supply will 
last about a month, but some experts say it 
will be longer. The oil companies and the 
Energy Department say there is no shor- 
tage. 

ACCORDING TO figures compiled by 
Lundberg, the price increase has already 
started. The national average price of a 
gallon of gasoline rose about a half-cent in 
November. So far this year, the national 



average is up by 4 cents a gallon. 

In Indianapolis, for example, premium 
gasoline containing lead rose 1.3 cents to 
73.3 cents a gallon in November. In Des 
Moines, it was up 2 cents to 76.7 cents a 
gallon, according to Lundberg. 

The price rises stem in part from tight- 
ness in gasoline supplies. Shell Oil Co., the 
nation's largest gasoline producer, has cut 
supplies of all products to service stations. 
Standard Oil of Indiana, which sells Amoco 
gasoline, has cut dealers' supplies of 
unleaded gasoline. Other major oil com- 
panies say their supplies also are tight, but 
they haven't announced plans to ration the 
product to dealers. 

Dealers are raising their prices to com- 
pensate for what in many cases, especially 
Shell and Amoco, will be lower volume. 

"It's just economics," Matties said. "If a 
dealer now only has 75 percent of the 
product he was getting, he's going to have to 
increase his profit to offset his loss in sales. 
Theoverhead goes on." 

The tight supply is the result of an 
unusually high amount of driving in the late 
summer and fall. Gasoline demand, which 
traditionally drops off markedly after Labor 
Day, failed to do so this year as Americans 
look advantage of good autumn weather. 
Although the oil companies had plenty of 
crude oil on hand, they couldn't make 
gasoline fast enough to keep up with 
demand. 




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has for being the daughter of 1936 GOP 
presidential nominee Alf Landon. 

But in interviews at her campaign office 
and comfortable home in a rural area west 
of Wichita, she said she felt no special 
responsibility to the women's movement 
when she becomes the only woman senator 
in the 96th Congress. 

Among other points she made were : 

—She hopes to serve in the Senate two 
terms and has no desire to seek higher office 
as her father did. 

—The person she admires most is Abigail 
Adams, wife of the second president 
because "somehow I myself have admired 



women who have been strong behind the 
scenes and I still do." She counts her own 
mother in that category. 

Kassebaum had left Wichita with three of 
her four children in 1975 to work for a year 
on Pearson's staff in Washington because 
she believed "maybe it was a good time to 
get a tittle breathing space." That ex- 
perience, she said, led to her candidacy. 

Kassebaum said her 91 -year-old father did 
not hesitate to offer advice during her 
campaign— advice she noted but did not 
always follow— and that she expects it to 
continue when she's a senator. 

"Ill never need to ask," she said. 



Jamaica 




May 19-26 



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14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«d., D«»mbir 6, 1978 




Flags filched outside sheriff's office 



>t 



LAWRENCE (AP)— Lawrence and 
Douglas County authorities are looking for 
the hold thief who took the Kansas and 
American flags from poles at the Douglas 
County Law Enforcement Center over the 
weekend . 

The flags, property of the county, flew just 
outside the office window of Sheriff Rex 
Johnson But he was not in his office when 



they were taken sometime Friday evening 
or Saturday morning 

Police and sheriff's officers were a little 
emharrassed that the theft happened right 
outside their building, but they also chided 
the county for not following a rule for theft 
victims. 

County officials waited until Monday, 
more lhan two days after the theft, before 
reporting the flags missing. 



Christmas tale 



Stafl photo bv Sue Ptannmuller 



During a break in the singing at Tuesday's nooner in the K- State Union 
Catskeller, Sally Shutter, freshman in music, let out Cynthia, the 5-year- 
old she said she has inside her, to talk about Christmas. 



Inflation plan workable solution, /r 
says former Carter adviser 



TOPEKA (AP)— Robert Strauss, 
President Carter's former chief inflation 
fighter who now is his main foreign trade 
negotiator, said Tuesday the ad- 
ministration's anti -inflation program will 
work if given a chance. 

"It isn't so complicated, but it's com- 
prehensive, it's fair, and it will work if we 
give it a chance," Strauss said of criticism 
from some quarters of the voluntary wage 
and price controls Carter has espoused in an 
effort to control inflation. 

"If you don't want voluntary controls, 
what do you want? Mandatory controls? We 
don't need any more controls. You can get 
government into your business real easy, 
but it's almost impossible to get them out," 
Strauss said in addressing the 60th annual 
meeting of the Kansas Farm Bureau. 

The former Democratic national chair- 
man said Carter "has committed this ad- 
ministration to self-restraint that I haven't 
seen in the two decades I've been around 
Washington" in the fight against inflation. 

Strauss said a key element of the anti- 
inflation program will be the monitoring of 
food prices at the farm level and at the retail 
level. 

"We are going to hold the line on retail 
prices," he declared. "If there is a drop at 
the farm level, we expect the savings to be 
passed on to the consumer." 

IN THE PAST, Strauss said, the big in- 
creases on food have at the processing and 
retailing levels, not at the farm level. 

The way to keep prices farmers get for 
their products at a reasonable level is to 
expand U.S. exports of agricultural com- 
modities, Strauss said. 

He said the current trade negotiations 
should provide improvements in those 
markets. 

American farmers can expect modest 
improvements in their trade positions in 
foreign markets as a result of the 
negotiations in Tokyo and Geneva, but 
Strauss cautioned them not to expect too 
much. 

"I'm not going to over-promise you, but 
we're going to make progress" in expanding 
world trade for U.S products, agriculturally 
and industrially, Strauss said. 



"I don't want to over-state it, but I'm very 
optimistic," he said. 

He said farmers could expect a "C-plus, or 
R minus" rating on how much the trade 
negotiations now nearing conclusion would 
help open up world markets. 

Strauss, Carter's special ambassador on 
trade negotiations, said the key for the U.S. 
is to "chip away" at trade restrictions 
imposed by foreign governments. 

He said tentative agreements on beef and 
citrus products was reached with Japan just 
Monday night, but declined to give specifics. 
He said they would be made public when all 
negotiations are concluded so farmers and 
others can study the entire package. 

STRAUSS, a Texas native, said he is 
hopeful the package of trade agreements 
with Japan and the European Common 
Market can be completed yet this year and 
submitted to Congress early in 1979. 

He urged Kansas farmers to study the 
package, judge it on the basis that small 
improvements now could lead to bigger 
things later, and if they can support it tell 
their congressmen. 




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SHC AWARENESS DAY 
Thursday, Dec. 7, 1978 

8:30-4:00 
K-State Union 

Topics for Awareness 

will be: 

Blindness 

^ Hearing Impaired 

Learning Disabilities 

Physically Impaired 

Amputees 



FORUM HALL 



FRIDAY-SATURDAY 



SUNDAY 



Classic Eastwood . . .fast, furious and funny" 

ROQ9f Etietf. Chicago Sun-Times 

INI* EASTWOOD I 
HE CifUINTUET ! 





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I < II 1 1 Mill 4 I'll IIIKIV I'r. — .'.it, 

A RASTAR (ill BI-RTCATIS Prmlu.ii<in 

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IWDA 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wed, D«ctmb«r6,1978 



15 




ABOVE... While Minnesota coach 
Jim Dutcher was lowering his 
head duning the second half of 
Tuesday night's game, 
RIGHT... K State coach Jack 
Hartman and his assistant Lon 
Kruger (middle) were busy 
giving instructions to guard 
Rolando Blackman. 




'Cats, fans bring the house down 



StaH pholos by Bo Raaer 



By JIM GIBBONS 
Sports Editor 

K-State "rocked the old barn*' as Jack 
Hartman put it, with a crushing offensive 
output in the second half to erase a nine- 
point halftime deficit and defeat Minnesota 
72-62 last night in Ahearn Field House before 
11, 100 delirious fans. 

Hartman played only six players in the 
entire game but each of the starters hit the 

S ports 



James Jackson led the Golden Gophers with 
IS points and Darryl Mitchell added 13. 
McHale led Minnesota with eight rebounds. 

K-STATE SHOT 48.4 percent from the 
field and 76.9 percent from the free throw 
line. Minnesota hit 43.5 and 53.3 respec- 
tively. ' 

But the Wildcats had to hit 55.9 percent of 



their shots in the second half to bring up 
their average. They shot a dismal 40 percent 
in the opening period. 

Both teams opened the game tight, 
displaying signs of nervousness. Minnesota 
scored its first bucket with 17:57 left in the 
half on a 15-foot jumper by McHale. K-State 
got on the board with 17: 14 remaining on a 
jumper from the right side by Blackman. 



Minnesota maintained a two-point lead 
until midway through the half. The Gophers 
then scored 12 unanswered points to expand 
their lead to 27-14 before Nealy broke the 
drought with a 17-foot jumper. 

The 'Cats and Gophers traded baskets for 
the rest of the half until Soldner hit a iayup 
and Blackman hit a 15- fooler from the right 
(See WILLS, p. 16) 



double figures, with freshman Ed Nealy 
leading the way with 19 points and eight 
rebounds. 

Rolando Blackman had 17 points, 11 in the 
second half, and Steve Soldner and Jari 
Wills each had 12. Guard Glenn Marshall 
added 10 and Tyrone Adams had two points. 

"1 thought they (K-State) did an excellent 
job offensively and defensively in the second 
half," Hartman said. "I think we were a 
little awed of their size in the first half." 

Soldner led K-State in rebounding with 
nine. Wills added nine rebounds and Black- 
man had four. 

MINNESOTA DOMINATED the boards in 
the first half, forging a 23 to 11 advantage 
there, But the 'Cats fought back to capture 
35 to the Golden Gophers' 43. 

"Defensively, we took them out of their 
rhythm," Hartman said. "We loosened up in 
the second half and attacked a little more 
aggressively. We went from a waltz to a 
faster number." 

"They played a 3-2 zone and it was real 
tough," Soldner said, "We had a hard time 
reading il. They were making it tough to get 
open inside. Plus, they were covering the 
perimeter jumpers as well." 

One area that pleased Hartman was 
turnovers, K-State turned the ball over 
seven times. 

"1 was pleased because we'd been making 
too many turnovers," Hartman said. "We 
really went to work on their man (one-on- 
one) defense. It was a great victory. Very 
satisfying." 

The Wildcats held Minnesota's top scorer, 
6-10 forward Kevin McHale, to eight points. 




HAIR BY RICK * fllENDS 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wed., D«c«mbtr8, 1978 



15 



1 




ABOVE... While Minnesota coach 
Jim Dutcher was lowering his 
head during the second half of 
Tuesday night's game, 
RIGHT... K- State coach Jack 
Hartman and his assistant Lon 
Kruger (middle) were busy 
giving instructions to guard 
Rolando Blackman. 




'Cats, fans bring the house down 



Stall photo* by Bo Racier 



By JIM GIBBONS 
Sports Editor 

K-State "rocked the old barn" as Jack 
Hartman put it, with a crushing offensive 
output in the second half to erase a nine- 
point halt tune deficit and defeat Minnesota 
72-62 last night in Ahearn Field House before 
ll,lWdehriousfans. 

Hartman played only six players in the 
entire game but each of the starters hit the 



James Jackson led the Golden Gophers with 
15 points and Darryl Mitchell added 13. 
McHale led Minnesota with eight rebounds. 

K-STATE SHOT 48.4 percent from the 
field and 76.9 percent from the free throw 
line. Minnesota hit 43.5 and 53.3 respec- 
tively. " 

But the Wildcats had to hit 55.9 percent of 



their shots in the second half to bring up 
their average. They shot a dismal 40 percent 
in the opening period . 

Both teams opened the game tight, 
displaying signs of nervousness. Minnesota 
scored its first bucket with 17:57 left in the 
half on a 15-foot jumper by McHale. K-State 
got on the board with 17:14 remaining on a 
jumper from the right side by Blackman. 



Minnesota maintained a two-point lead 
until midway through the half. The Gophers 
then scored 12 unanswered points to expand 
their lead to 27-14 before Nealy broke the 
drought with a 17-foot jumper. 

The 'Cats and Gophers traded baskets for 
the rest of the half until Soldner hit a layup 
and Blackman hit a 15-footer from the right 
(See WILLS, p. 16 »_ 



f S ports 



double figures, with freshman Ed Nealy 
leading the way with 19 points and eight 
rebounds. 

Rolando Blackman had 17 points, 11 in the 
second half, and Steve Soldner and Jari 
Wills each had 12. Guard Glenn Marshall 
added 10 and Tyrone Adams had two points. 

"I thought they (K-State) did an excellent 
job offensively and defensively in the second 
half," Hartman said. "I think we were a 
little awed of their size in the first half." 

Soldner led K-Slate in rebounding with 
nine. Wills added nine rebounds and Black- 
man had four. 

MINNESOTA DOMINATED the boards in 
Ibe first half, forging a 23 lo 11 advantage 
(here. But the 'Cats fought back to capture 
35 to the Golden Gophers' 43. 

"Defensively, we look them out of their 
rhythm," Hartman said. "We loosened up in 
the second half and attacked a little more 
aggressively. We went from a waltz to a 
faster number. ' ' 

"They played a 3-2 zone and it was real 
lough," Soldner said. "We had a hard time 
reading it. They were making it tough to get 
open inside. Plus, they were covering the 
perimeter jumpers as well." 

One area that pleased Hartman was 
turnovers. K-State turned the ball over 
seven times. 

"I was pleased because we'd been making 
too many turnovers," Hartman said. "We 
really went to work on their man < one-on- 
one 1 defense. It was a great victory. Very 
satisfying." 

The Wildcats held Minnesota's top scorer, 
6-10 forward Kevin McHale, to eight points 




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18 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wed., December 6, 1978 



Wilcox leads women 
to victory over Huskers 



The women's basketball team came from 
behind to beat the University of Nebraska in 
Lincoln 77-71 last night in the 'Cats' third 
straight road game. 

K-State, which trailed the Conhuskers at 
the half, 4241, was able to pull it out to keep 
intact an 8-0 record of never losing to 
Nebraska. Last year, the 'Cats won, 63-57. 

"1 thought we got off to a slow, start," 
Coach Judy Akers said. "We were dragging 
a little in the beginning." 

The high scorer for the 'Cats was Lee Ann 
Wilcox with 16 points. Wilcox was also the 
leading rebounder with nine. 

"Offensively, Eileen Feeney kept us in the 
game," Akers said. 

At one point, Feeney, a junior forward, 
had eight of K-State's 14 points. She went on 
to score 14 points in the game. 

High scorer for the Cornhuskers was 
Diane DelVigna, a 5-8 forward, with 22 
points. Jan Crouch scored 17 and Carol 
Garey scored 14 as leading Husker 
rebounder with 13 grabs. 



"When you're on the road, you'll take a 
win any way you can get it," Akers said. 

K-State now holds a 3-3 record for the 
season. The team returns home to play 
Missouri next Tuesday. 

Jayvees lose 

Eugene Goodlow was playing basketball 
for the first time this season since he had 
injured his ankle playing for the football 
team. But the addition of Goodlow to the 
junior varsity team was to no avail; the K 
State JV lost to Dodge City Junior College, 
83-74, before the varsity game against 
Minnesota last night. 

Goodlow went six for 11 to score 12 points. 
The high scorer for the Wildcats was John 
Chmiel, who went 10 for 26, for 20 points, 
James Bailey went eight for 20, and two for 
two from the free throw line, to rack up 18 
points. 




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Welcome 

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Family 

Hair 

Center 




Behind 

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For the Month of December 



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receive a free hair re-conditioning treatment if desired. 

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Come and tapy coffee and cookies and 
meet 2 Sfyfefs « Me "BACK BOOM SAL0H", 



Stall photo by Pete Soma 



LEAPFROG... K-State center Steve Soldner snares a rebound under the 
watchful eye of Minnesota forward James Jackson (right) during 
Tuesday night's game. Soldner had nine rebounds and 12 points. 



Wills sparks Wildcats' surge 



(continued from p. IS) 

side with 43 seconds left to cut Minnesota's 
lead to 33-24. 

Hartman's troops opened the second half 
with two straight baskets. That brought the 
crowd to its feet with a deafening roar that 
they sustained throughout the half. 

"I think the crowd definitely intimidated 
them," Soldner said. "They were young and 
the crowd really got to them." 

K-State chipped away at Minnesota's 
lead, reeling off a 9-2 spurt to tie the game at 
43 with 10:21 remaining. Marshall and 
Blackmans outside shooting fueled the 
spurt, forcing the Gophers out of their zone 
defense. 

"We need to be a little more patient," 



Marshall said. "If things are going wrong, I 
have to start things. " 

The 'Cats never relinquished the lead 
after Marshall hit a driving layup to give K- 
State the advantage for the first time in the 
contest. 

Wills hit eight points in the last two 
minutes to ice the game, including a 
resounding dunk at the buzzer. 

K-State improved its record to 4-1 and 
hosts Cal Poly-Pomona Saturday. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W»d., D*c»mb«f e, 1 978 



17 



— Jim Gibbons 



Football facts 



By J tM GIBBONS 
Sports Editor 

K State began its 1978 football season with 
a great deal of optimism and ended it on the 
same note, finishing with wins over 
Colorado and Kansas. 

First year Head Coach Jim Dickey 
promised to restore fun to K-State football. 



No cheers 

from the pressbox 



Dickey kept his promise, managing to win 
four games. And, as everybody knows, 
there's nothing more fun than winning. 

Plus, K-State tied for fifth in the Big 8 with 
a 3-4 mark. That performance was much 
better than the preseason polls, which 
picked the 'Cats to finish in the conference 
cellar. 

Oklahoma and Nebraska tied for first with 
6-1 marks. Missouri and Iowa State 
deadlocked for third with 4-3 records. K- 
State and Oklahoma State tied for fifth with 
a 3-4 mark. Colorado took seventh at 2-5 and 
KU claimed the cellar with an 0-7 slate. 

But the Wildcats also compiled im- 
pressive individual and team statistics 
during Dickey's first season as a head 
coach. 

OBVIOUSLY, K-STATE had its trouble on 
defense, finishing seventh in the league in 
rushing defense. They yielded 244 yards per 
game compared to top-ranked Nebraska's 
150.7 average. 

The 'Cats also ranked seventh in passing 
defense, allowing 144.6 yards a contest with 
Iowa State taking first with a 102-yard 
average. 

Not surprisingly, K-State also finished 
seventh in total defense, giving up 388.6 
yards per game. They also were seventh (at 
least they were considered consistent) in 
scoring defense, allowing 31.1 points per 
game. 

However, the offensive side was a dif- 
ferent story. The Wildcats went wild on 
offense, leading the league and finishing 
23rd in the country in passing with 183.5 
'ft-ards per game. 

K-State finished fourth in total offense 
behind Nebraska, Oklahoma and Missouri. 
The 'Cats racked up an average of 336.3 
yards per game. 

The 'Cats ranked sixth in scoring with an 
18.3 points per game average, despite being 
shut out by Arizona and Iowa State. 

DICKEY'S TEAM managed a seventh- 
place ranking in rushing with the help of 
fullback Roosevelt Duncan and tailbacks 
Mack Green and L.J. Brown. They averaged 
152.7 yards per game, far below Oklahoma's 
427.5 yards per game on the ground, good 
enough for No. l in the nation. 

K-State's biggest accomplishments were 
individual performances, highlighted by 
wide receiver Charlie Green's second 
straight Big 8-leading season in pass 
receiving. 

Green caught 39 passes for 616 yards and 
three touchdowns to earn first team all-Big 8 
honors from both AP and UPI. Sophomore 
Eugene Goodlow finished sixth with 20 
catches for 547 yards and four touchdowns 
despite missing the entire Iowa State and 
Colorado games and seeing only limited 
duty against KU. 

Goodlow also finished second in all- 
purpose running with a 134.8 yard-per-game 
average, trailing Oklahoma's Heisman 
winner Billy Sims, who averaged 163.4 yards 
per game. Sims ranked third and Goodlow 
19th in the nation in all-purpose running. 

SENIOR MACK GREEN ranked 10th at 
season's end with a 62.3 average per game in 
rushing. Duncan was 12th with 48.4 yards a 
game and Brown was 15th with 37.9 yards 
per game, although he accumulated 218 
yards in his last two games. 

Quarterback Dan Manucci and 



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10 A.M.— 2 P.M. 



Nebraska's Rick Burns tied for the longest 
run of the season, 82 yards. Manucci got his 
run against Kansas and Berns notched his 
against Missouri. 

Manucci finished second in the Big 8 in 
passing with an 11 . 1 completion average per 
game. He finished behind MU's Phil 
Bradley, who beat Manucci out during the 
final games of the season. 

Manucci attempted 237 passes; completed 
122 for a .515 percentage. He also had 1,808 
yards and nine TDs. 

Despite Manucci's impressive stats, he 
failed to make AP's all-Big 8 team. Walter 
Grant of Iowa State, Bill Solomon of 
Colorado and Scott Burk of Oklahoma State 
were named honorable mention despite 
statistics inferior to Manucci's. Oh, well, 
what do writers know anyway? 

MANUCCI ALSO finished second in total 
offense, averaging 164 yards per contest. 

Punter Don Birdsey was third with a 41.0 
yards per kick average, KU's Mike Hubach 
was second with a 41.4-yard average and 
Steve Duo I ill k' of Colorado took the punting 
title with a 42.4-yard average. 

Charlie Green had the conference's 
longest punt return, 73 yards against 
Colorado, and had another lengthy return 
called back against KU. 

Goodlow was second in the Big 8 and 21st 
in the nation in kickoff returns, averaging 
23.6 yards per return. 

Free safety Sam Owen was second in 
interception returns by OU's Darrol Ray. 
Owen picked off five passes for 91 yards in 
returns. 

K-Staters also were impressive in single 
game performances with Manucci leading 
the way. 

Manucci had the league's best passing 
performance, 343 against Auburn. He also 
had the third (294 against Tulsa), fourth (244 
against Nebraska) and sixth (221 against 
Air Force). 

As a team, K-State ranked high in one- 
game performances. The Wildcats had the 
first (378 yards versus Auburn), third (294 
versus Tulsa), seventh (250 against 
Nebraska) and ninth (229 yards versus Air 
Force) best passing performances in the 
league. 

K-STATE'S DEFENSE had the fifth-best 
performance in both rushing defense and 
total defense. They limited OSU to 59 yards 
on the ground and 156 yards total offense. 

An experienced, veteran offense and a 
young, inexperienced defense were the 
trademarks of K-S!ate"s football team in 
1978. 

But with the host of starters returning 
next year, the Wildcats should have a fine 
chance of bettering this season's record. 



Come 

T0IF 

Friday, Dec. 8 

1-6 p.m. 

Dark Horse Tavern 

two free kegs 

♦US Pitchers 

Reese present activity cards 

HEY SENIORS 
It's Another Parly! 

Senior Shirts end ActWHy Cords shl on Sole at Hols House 






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FREE FILMS 



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Little Theatre 



(Tfjjkstat e u nion 



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ANOTHER LIFE CHANGED 
BY JESUS CHRIST 




I was born and raised in Venezuela. My parents, who are Catholics, never forced me to go 
to church or keep any Catholic sacrament; but I liked to go to church by myself. I also tried to 
be faithful to the church by doing whatever the priest said was good for me. I did these things 
because I always felt guilty and separated from God because of my sins. I hated to think about 
going to hell, so in trying to compensate for my sins I went to church every Sunday and tried to 
fulfill the church commandments. This actually did make me feet better, at least I didn 'tfeel 
guilty right after church services or after I went to confession. But my spiritual happiness 
didn't last long; it disappeared very quickly because I couldn't stay away from sinning even for a little while. This 
bothered me, so I had no other choice but to alleviate my guilt by going to church until I finally got tired of it. I realized 
that all my religious activities didn 't improve my relationship with God I quit attending church and devoted myself to 
living a sinful life without restraint or paying attention to feelings of guiltiness. 1 really got turned off by religion, but I 
couldn 't quit praying. I felt like I had to pray before I went to bed every night and ask God to forgive my sins. I did this 
because of fear. The fear of dying and going to hell. 

When I came to the states. I didn t see anything worth living for. I was very aware of the fact that riches, honor and 
other things that people lived for would not count after I died and stood before God. 

I came to KSU with the idea of starting a new life apart from the vicious habits I was attached to. The first people 1 
met were Christians. I had never heard the gospel of Christ before, so what they had to tell me seemed very new to me. I 
met a Venezuelan Christian who talked to me about how Jesus Christ had come to save sinners from eternal death in 
hell. The Bible says that Jesus paid with His blood for all our sins, so that whoever believes in Him should not perish but 
have eternal life. I understood that Christ died and resurrected because He loved me and wanted me to have a personal 
relationship with God. So, J received Christ because I didn 't want to be eternally separated from God, fear death, and 
live a hopeless life without purpose. Above all. I wanted to know the God who created all things. 

Now I have God as my friend and I am secure in His love. Therefore there is no way I am going to be condemned to 
eternal death because God paid for my sins at Calvary. Besides that, 1 am enjoying the fact that I now have power in 
Christ to overcome sin and no longer have guilt in my life because Jesus took my burdens away from me. 

Finally. I really believe that Jesus Christ is what every person needs in order to know God and where he will spend 
life after death, and enjoy a peaceful and meaningful life here. 

Andres Mmrt.no 
Sophomore in Food 
Engineering Technology 



i 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Wed., DttM** •. *•?• 



II 



18 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wed, December 6, 1 978 










a V 



Just a little bit 

Vicki Arnold, sophomore in foods 
and nutrition, works on an ex- 
periment testing the properties of 
fats and oils during Elementary 
Organic Chemistry lab in Willard 
Hall. 

Staff photo ev Sue Ptannmuller 



doWttStOWn by Tim Downs 



f CHESTER, Iti 
GOINGTOSHOW 
THIS BOOKTOTHE 
BOYS IN THE HOUSE. 





PEANUTS 



by Charles Shultk 



IN I\M BOOK ABOUT 
BEETHOVEN, iVEMAPE 
A FEU) IMPROVEMENTS 




FOR INSTANCE, IN5TEAC? 

OF RJWIN6 THE PIANO, 
I HAVE HIM PLA^INe 

AN ElECfKlC GUITAR... 




f Also, in mv book: 

ME PQESN'T HAVE 
5TOMACH »IN5. 



V 



sf^ 



iVe uppatep n 
To tennis Elbow J 





Crossword By Eugene Sheffer 



CRYPTOQUIP 12-6 

HUMGLAJE LGJSA LHKTGMEK VDD 
SDVKKTWWU TWGEHJA 



ACROSS 
1 Posed for 

portrait 
4 Give a bad 

review 

7 Pulpit 

8 Wild 
animals 

10 Rapier 

11 Spheres of 
combat 

13 It's almost 
here 

16 High, in 
music 

17 Ocean- 
going 
vessel 

18 Farm 
implement 

19 Withered 

20 Luzon 
native 

21 Frighten 
23 Effeminite 

boy 



27 Actor 40 Poet's word 8 Actor: 
Chaney 41 Before John — 

28 Derived DOWN 9 Obis 
from oil 1 Two-year 10 The urial 

30 Explorer salmon 12 Blackened 

Johnson 2 Hillside 14 French river 

33 Shoppers dugout IS Education 

carry them 3 Small child org, 

36 Courteous 4 Pocketbook 19 Polish river 

37 — Walton 5 Moslem 20 An enzyme 

38 " - on noble (var.) 21 Sailing 
Sunday" 6 Zola novel vessel 

39 Inferior 7 GI's 
horses 



22 To carom, 
misstep in billiards 

Average solution time : 26 min. 23 Satisfy 

^■■Rp 



Yesterday's Cryptoqulp - GALA GIFTS SNARE THE S j Ardor 
FRIENDLY HOLIDAY SHOPPER. zs "V 3 "^ 

Today's Cryptoqulp clue: V equals A 




Answer to yesterday's puzzle. 



24 Slant 

25 House wing 

26 Send or 
direct 

28 Pointed arch 

29 Metric unit 

30 Kind of 
orange tree 

31 RR depots 

32 Inquire 

34 Merriment 

35 River to the 
Danube 



Some prefer Scruffy 
to eternal companion 

JESSUP, Md. (AP)— At least 16 persons in 
Howard County want to be buried alongside 
their pets, and a pet cemetery here is 
seeking a permit to grant their wishes. The 
cemetery owner wants county permission to 
bury humans in caskets and vaults. He said 
he has already buried the cremated remain 
of eight humans with their pets. 

The ashes of one person, he said, are in the 
same casket as the pet dog's remains, and 
one couple has expressed a desire to share a 
"family plot" with 10 cats and a dog. A 
county official said he sees "no great 
problems" in granting the permit. 



Collegian 
Classifieds 



CLASSIFIED RATES 
On* day: 20 words or less, $1.50, 5 cants 
par word over 20; Two days: 20 words or lass, 
$2.00. 8 cants par word over 20; Three days: 
20 words or lass, $2.25, 10 cants par word 
over 20; Four days: 20 words or less, $2.75, 13 
cants par word over 20; Five days: 20 words or 
less, $3.00, 15 cents per word over 20. 

Classifieds are payable In advance unless client has an 
established account with Student Publications. 

Deadline Is 10 a.m. day before publication, to a.m. Friday 
(or Monday paper. 

Hams found ON CAMPUS can be advertised FREE for a 
period not exceeding three days. They can be placed at Ked- 
zle 103 or by calling 532*555 

Die play Classified Rales 

One day: 12.75 per inch; Three days: 12.60 per Inch; Five 
days: $2. SO per Inch; Tan days: K 40 par Inch. (Deadline It 5 
p.m. 2 days before publication.) 

Classified advertising Is available only to those who do not 
discriminate on the basis ol race, color, religion, national 
origin, sex or ancestry. 

FOR SALE 



MANHATTAN USED Furniture, 
browse. 77M1 1 2 (3-75) 



317 S. 4th, Coma in and 



WE SELL Meranti and Phillips, Tech Electronic Warehouse, 
across from Vista Drive Inn on Tuttle Cree* Blvd. I23H) 

MOSSMAN GUITARS— due to laetory shut down I have for a 
short time some very nice acoustic steel string guitars at 
less than hall original price Call after 5:00 p.m. 316 221 
2629 or 221 3966, Wlnlleld, KS. (52-71) 

1976 HOMETTE mobile home, 14x70, three bedrooms, com- 
pletely lurnlshed. central air. skirted, tie downs. Excellent 
condition. Cell S37 -4066 attar 5:00 p m (65-69) 

GUNS. NEW selection Coll, Roger, S*W. H Q . Llama, Ex- 
can. Luger, Titan, Winchester, others. Excellent selection 
Ol caliber. Treasure Chest. Old Town. (65-69) 

COINS MAKE excellent gilts Complete selection US and 
Foreign Blrthyear and anniversary sets available Treasure 
Chesl. Old Town Malt— Aggleville (65-76) 

CHESS SETS, hand carved, wooden and onyx Also Chess 
tables and backgammon sets. Ideal Chrl almas gifts. 
Treasure Chest, Aggleville (65-761 

ANTIQUE JEWELRY and watches, nice selection ol the 
classic old styles for Christmas Old Town Mall and 
Aggleville (65-74! 

JUST PURCHASED 500 used science fiction paperbacks 
Remarkable selection Treasure Chest, 1124 Moro, 
Aggleville Also have westerns, romances, novels, detec- 
tives (65691 

(Continued on peg* 19) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«d^DMMfnbw8,1fTS 



1f 



I 



(Continued from pg. 18) 

1973 JAVELIN, power brake*, timing, excellent condition, 
sharp looking Only MM Call lor Lou •< 539-5033 (6549) 

PeEARS 14,000 BTU air conditioner. Used Iwo summers, e* 
cedent condition. Only 1100 Call 7704783 ifltr 500 p.m. 
■Ml 

1968 CHEVROLET Biscay rte, 8 cylinder*, air conditions, 
everything In parted condition. Bail of far over 1350. Call 
T764783 attar 540 p m. (6549) 



Pecans 

FOR SALE DEC. 7 & 8 

At Upper Research 

Greenhouse directly 

north of Dickens Hall 

from7:30a.m. to 

5:30 p.m. 

By Horticulture 
Club 

All pre-cracked-in 

multiples of 5 lb. bags 

only$1.30/lb. 



STEREO SYSTEM In excellent condition. Realistic STA44B 
stereo receiver, two Raallatlc electro* tat 2* speakers. 
Sony TC 270 real to reel stereo tape recorder with 
speakers, all this tor only 8400. Call 778-8783 alter 500 

p.m. (85491 

OAK ROCKER, oak swivel desk chair, oak library labia, hall 
tree, oak dresser, pie cupboard and chest. 7784708 after 
iOOp.m (67-71) 

STUDDED SNOW tires New, fit 13 Inch wheels 539-4128 af- 
ter 5:00 p.m (8749) 

MUST SELL 1972 mobile home 12x70, with patio and shad. 
Call 539-1839 alter 5:00 pm or anytime on weekend*. (67- 
M) 

1977 BELLA Vista trailer house. Iwo bedroom, furnished, 
skirted, shed Just like new and In excellent location. 537 
9803.(67 71) 

MOBILE HOME, 12x80, two bedroom, lot* of living space, 
built-in dressers, skirled and lied down. Nice lot. 537 7198 
(87-71) 

USED KING *i» water bad; complete kit included 7780338 
(08-71) 

1974 HONDA Civic, 66,000 mile*. New paint, rebuilt engine, 
American racing wheels, T.A. radial* 537-2050. (88-70) 

1974 GREMLIN, black, lull power. V4 engine. New lire*. Call 
537-2050. (89-70) 



NEW 14 WIDE HOMES 
AS LOW AS $8,850! 

P Payments Less Than Rent 

Used Homes For Sale 
Homes For Rent 

WOODY'S MOBILE 
HOME SALES 

2044 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 

Manhattan, Kansas 66502 

913-539-5621 

Approved FHA-VA Financing 



HEATH H4 microcomputer with 4K memory. Complete wllh 
software and documentation Will bu lid complete system 
at a reasonable cost. 539-5956. (68-72) 

u i 70 WINDSOR, two bedroom e xcell en I condition. Good 
investment, low monthly payment*, fenced yard, stereo, 
0W GD, centrel air, large shed. Located near Tuttle Creak. 
Available Jan. 1*1.537-9132.(68-71) 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS Tt-57 programmable calculator, t45. 
Tl-25 scientific calculator 125. TI-59 software: Statistics, 
electronic engineering, securities and printer utility. 534 
5950.(68-72) 

SONY Nfl-115 professional Dolby noise reduction adapter. 
One year warranty. Calibration tapes are Included lor 
cassaette and reello-reel recorders. 539-5958 (68-72) 



it 



ROCK N ROLL" 



GOODIES! 

Guitars, Amps & P.A.'s demon- 
strated in a Large club size area. 
( NOW FULLY CARPETED) 
Come in and SEE! 
Gibson L6S-Custom w/case 
was 688.00 now $349.00 

Gibson EB series Bass gtr. 
was 329.00 now $199.00 

Fender Stratocaster Nat. ( New ) 

•Special* 
Ibanez Les Paul Cust. Copy 

(collectable) 
was 349.00 now $23900 

Gibson J-45 Dlxe Acoustic ( new) 
was 519.00 now $379.00 

at 

MUSIC VILLAGE 

417 Humboldt Downtown Thurs. till8:30 



ONE MINI-GYM quadricep and hamstring teg machine Ex- 
cellent Christmas preeent tor en athlete. 778-1064 (68-71) 

WHITE CHEST of drawer* wth matching deek. full size met- 
trees and box springs, Iron rod aquarium stand. All In good 
condition. Price negotiable. 778-5622. (89-73) 

1975 CHEVY Monza 2 plus 2. V 8, Automatic, power steering, 
air conditioning, one owner 5394345 afternoon and 
evenings. (6473) 

METALLIC BLUE 4-door Chevy Mallbu, 57,000 miles, radio, 
air, a- track, V8, fantastic condition, 1965, negotiable. Celt 
7780914 today (89-73) 

1964 KAHMANN Ghla Coupe, rebuilt engine, excellent con- 
dition, 537-2847. 199-711 

CANON MF motor drive tor F-i. Three month* old with new 
warranty. 5324555, aak lor Craig Chandler. (69-73) 

HZZ FOR RENT 

TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electric* and manuals: day, week 
or month. Buzzell*. 51 1 Leavenworth, across from post of 
flea. Call 7764469. (Itf) 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS: Excellent selection Hull Business 
Machines, 1212 Mora, 539-7931. Service most make* of 
typewriters. Also Victor and Olivetti adders. (1811) 

SANTA SurTS. Reserve your* now. Treasure Cheat, 
Aggievllle. (43-76) 

LARGE TWO bedroom apartment wllh two sleeping loft*, 
1270, bills paid, at 1016 Osage. 537-4233 (57-71) 

LARGE ONE bedroom furnished apartment at 221 N. Juliette 
Water, dash, end heal paid, 8160 per month 7784866 or 1- 
4584814 (84-78) 

DUPLEX, FURNISHED, Mont Blue apartments One block 
from campus. All conveniences, eva liable lor second 
semester 5374058 (6449) 

UNIVERSITY PARK, furnished house. Three bedrooms 
Modem. Call 5344182. (6589) 

SMALL, ONE bedroom apartment, shower, near campus 
ttIS and electricity 5374141 after 540 p.m. (6549) 

PLUSH, TWO bedroom furnished apartment, carpeted, cen- 
tral sir. laundry dishwasher balcony, near campu*. 
Aggievllle, January. «*> 7784600 after 5:00 p m (66-70) 

NOW AVAILABLE newly carpeted two bedroom house Call 
532-31 21 or 537- 1 289. Art for Terry (66-70) 

TWO BEDROOM basement apartment, furnished 
Wsetterfdryer hook up. 8160 plus KPL, al 1822 Hunting, one 
Ml block from KSU 5394401.(6640) 



Villa Apartments 
526 N. 14th 

Available January 
2 Blocks from campus 

ONE-BEDROOM 
FURNISHED 
$200 A MONTH 

—No pets or children- 
Call 
537-9567 or 539-1201 



SUBLEASE 



LARGE FUftNIBHEG apartment al 1016 Osage, bedrooms 
and sleeping lofts, good for 3-4 people 8250, bills paid 
537-4233. (6645) 

FURNISHED BEDROOMS, kitchen and laundry facilities, 
tree parking and walk to KSU. 155 and up, bills paid. 537- 
4233. (68-95) 

THROUGH MAY, furnished two bedroom apartment. Dish- 
washer, air conditioned. Available January 1. Close to cam- 
pu* Call 537-7268 after 5:30 p.m. (67-71) 

HUGE ROOM lo rent, 885/monlh, all utilities paid, kitchen, 
laundry facilities Five minute walk to campu*. Call 532- 
6850 (9-5). Leave message tor Rich Ettenson. will return 
call (88-71) 

LARGE, FURNISHED, two bedroom epsrtment. One and one 
hall block* from campus, ground floor, clean No lease, no 
pets. 1 1 50 plus electricity. 5394275. (68-72) 

UNIQUE ONE bedroom furnished apartment. One block from 
campus. Ideal lor married couple or singles. 539-1324. (64 
89) 

MUST SEE this large one bedroom furnished duplex. 
Redecorated, country setting, close to town. 8185. No 
pets 7784846. (66-72) 



NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 

from $165 
FRK£. shattie service to 
KSU 

portion of utilities paid 
adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

PHONE 






539-2951 

or see at 
1413 Cambridge Place 



SECOND SEMESTER. Large, partly furnished Iwo bedroom 
house, one hall block from campus and Aggievllle 
Available Jen 1st, 1185. Rick or Wade 7764106 (68-7 1) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

FEMALES TO share exceptional house at KSU, furnished, 
privete bedrooms, 865 and up, washer and dryer, no pets, 
at 809 N 11th 5394401.(5746) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester. Private bedroom, laundry. 
Four blocks tram campus. ITS per month plus on* fourth 
utilities. Call 776-3644. (8549) 

FEMALE NEEDED lor spring semester to there furnished 
three bedroom apartment. Large private room. 895. 
utilities patd. Call Catharine. 5394444. (6549) 

MALE TO share large house one block from KSU. Prlvste 
bedroom, furnished. |T0 at 1108 Bluamont. 5394401. (88- 
95) 

LIBERAL MALE or female roommate for second semester. 
Two bedroom apartment one block from campus. 880 mon- 
th. 776-7368 alter 440 p.m (66-701 

FEMALE FOR spring semester, low bills, 1 100 month, private 
bedroom 776-7368 after 4:00 p.m .(86-701 

FEMALE WANTED to share luxurious large new two 
bedroom trailer house, convenient location. 180 plus on* 
third utilities. 776-7610(66-70) 

MALE TO share nice basement apartment two blocks from 
Aggievllle and tour blocks from campus. Call Korby 776- 
3084.(66-70) 

TWO FEMALES tor spring semester lo share large tour 
bedroom houae. Private rooms for (68 plus one slxlh 
utilities Cell 5374904. (67-7 1 ) 

NON -SMOKING female roommate needed lor Spring 
semester Share nice apartment with two others. 187.50 
month plus one third utilities. 7764811. (6749) 

NEEDED: TWO roommates for next semester Pel* mowed. 
Cheap and close lo campu a Call 776-3570 (87-76) 

FEMALES TO share large furnished apartment. Walk to cam- 
pus. 875 month. Utilities paid. 539-2663. (67-76) 

LIBERAL MALE lo share nice, completely furnished apart- 
ment lor spring semester. $90 month plus one third 
utilities. Call Don 7784071 (67-71) 

MALE ROOMMATE wanted, two bedroom apartment, close 
to campus. 885 plu* one third utilities. Cat) 5464175, keep 
trying. (8749) 

COZYI COMFY1 Privete furnished room in large Ok} 
houae— two baths, kitchen, washer 6 dryer, disposal, 
microwave oven, cleaning woman. Male or female 21 years 
or older. Can move In now— rent start* January 1. 1100 
plus utilities. Samara 7784606. (89-76) 

SHARE TWO bedroom apartment In quiet, wooded are* 
Fireplace Tour hslt-8150. utilities Included. J/74 7298 end 
778-7181. (6473) 

TWO FEMALE roommates. Luxury apartment. Fireplace, 
dishwasher. Call 7764057 after 500. (69-71) 

MALE TO share one bedroom furnished apartment lor 
second semester, laundry facilities, swimming pool, air 
conditioning, transport al Ion lo campus. S94rmonth plus 
1(2 utilities 5394932. keep trying (69-73) 

FEMALE WANTED to share comfy Wildcat Inn apartment on 
Clallln, call Pam 7764400. (69-71) 

ONE OR two to share two bedroom apartment al Wildcat 
Craek with Iwo males for spring semester. 7764643.(89-73) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE: prefer upperclass person. Two 
bedroom house, laundry facilities. Call this week or 
weekend, 7764796.(68-71) 



WOULD LIKE to have typing fobs, either big or email. 
Reasonable rale* Contact Debbie t 
al 5374922. (8749) 



I attar 5O0 or weekends 



ATTENTION 



HELP WANTED 



ONE BEDROOM furnished apartment Utilities paid, deposit 
required, no pets 5374734 or 778-5763 16471) 

NEAR CAMPUS. 2 or 3 males, private rooms, nice brick 
home. 537-4283 or 539-2683 (64-76) 

ONE BEDROOM, near campus, spacious, off street parking, 
heat psid, available Jin 1st 81 80 1131 Vattler 776-9896 
evenings (88-70) 

EFFICIENCY APARTMENT, near campus, heat paid, 
ivallalbe Jan t , 8135. qulel person preferred, 1 131 Vatlier. 
776-9896 evenings. (8470) 

NICE ONE bedroom apartment, good location 8100, 534 
7124, 539-6965 (69-73) 

ONE BEDROOM apart mant, one block west of campus. 
Available January 1st, $130 a month 7741068 or 537-2522. 
(69-76) 

LARGE NICELY furnished one bedroom basement apart 
ment. 600 block Vattler St. Couple or two singles. Under 
850 plus electricity No pets. 776-8055 (69-78) 



EXTRA HOURS earn you 8500 per 1000 stuffing envelopes 
with our circulars. For Information: S&S Enterprise. Dept 
1 1 , P.0 1 1 58, Mlddlerown , OH 45042 (53-77) 

OVERSEAS JOBS— Summerrtull time Europe, S America, 
Australia, Asia, etc. All fields, 1500-1200 monthly, ex- 
penses psid, sightseeing. Free Info. Write: international 
Job Center, Box 4490-KB, Berkeley, CA 94704 (80-79) 

AGGIE STATION Is now taking application* for waitresses- 
wall era . Apply In person, 1 1 1 5 M oro at tar 4O0 p . m, 185-70) 

JANITOR-FULL lime, mostly deys. Apply In person, office 
525, Ramada Inn. (6549) 

BURGER KING wan la individual to work two nighta during 
the week, 700 p.m. to 1O0 a.m. One weekend night 
req ul red 7ffl) p.m , to 3:00 S.m . Start 82.65 per hou r. $3 after 
one month Contact Mr. Wagner or Mr. Nelson In person . 
(8476) 

WAITRESS-WAITERS and bus persons part-time work. Good 
working condition*, good wages plus meals. Apply now In 
parson to start when you come back lor second semester 
Reynard's Restaurant (68-71) 

PART TIME campus representative position available im- 
mediately. Aggressive, highly motivated Individual needed 
to sell Spring Break sun and ski packages Excellent com- 
mission plus travel benefits. Call Summit Travel, Inc. (314) 
8744171 Immediately for an application (8472) 



SERVICES 

RESUMES WRITTEN from scratch. 118 and up Also general 
typing, writing, editing. Fast Action Resumes, 416 N. 3rd. 
537-7294. (86-76) 

STEREO REPAIR, over 500 replacamant styles In slock. The 

Circuit Shop, 7761221. 1204 More St. (8-78) 

THE OFFSET Press prints anything: resumes, brochures, let- 
terheads, posters, pamphlets, newspapers. Lei us do your 
next job 317 Houston. 776-4889 (22-tf) 



SOUPENE 
COMPUTER 

WHEEL 
ALIGNMENT 

1 14 South 5th Phone 776-8054 



ENGAGEMENT RINGS, wedding sets. Custom designing In 
gold and silver Jewelry repair Including antique Jewelry. 
Cuslom Jewelers. 5343225. 411 N. Third. (55-74) 

CHRISTMAS PORTRAITS. Pastel, charcoal and pencil 
likeness. Guaranteed. Prices from SS to 115 Live or from 
photo Call 776-3684. (80-76) 

WILL DO typing (I arm papers, resumes, etc.) any type of 
malarial Am experienced Call 7764088 (65-69) 

IS YOUR Volkawagon hard to Shift In cold weather? We csn 
Install « transmission oil thsl makes your shifter easy to 
Shift and protects your transmission belter Call J &L Bug 
Service for Information 1 -494-2386 (86-70) 



ATTENTION LADIES: KSU football recruiting has started and 
we need you for Kitten Krullera. Involves Saturday af- 
ternoon* hosting recruits lor lunch and lour of Manhattan. 
If Interested, call 5324874. (65-71) 

HAVE A Christmas cookie and enjoy your shopping al Wind 
fire Jewelry, 230 N. 3rd. Semi-praclou* gemstons 
necklaces 83.00. Large scenic picture jasper bracelets 
only 831.00, regular 147.00. Tiger eye bracelets 1 10.67 
Crazy lace egate bracelet* only 830.00. Men'* solid blue 
denim coral choker* 1 12.00. pensbefi ft 0.00. Men's gold 
and silver natural turquoise rings 50% oil, now 834 50 
Mother of Pearl stickpins 1600, bracelets 86.00, rings. 
$6.00, necklaces 810 00 and 84.00. All handmade sterling 
silver, turquoise bracelets 88.00 lo 826.00. Opal ring 14k 
gold regular 8135.00, now 8100.00. Opal necklaces now 
821.00. Men's and ladies tn color t4k gold rings 25% olf. 
Custom orders must be made this week on our remaining 
Stones, sale prices Included: Free turquoise earrings With 
every 845.00 purchase. (69-78) 



Christmas Concerto by Corelli: 
And 

THE HOUSE BY THE 

STABLE 

A Religious Drama In Verse 

By 
Charles Williams 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church 
6th & Poyntz 

Sun. Dec. 10 4:00P.M. 

No Admission Charge 



SINCE WEST Halt ha* the beat director and lady Hellers on 
campus, and since we love to kiss those ARH hogs, we 
proclaim today staff and ARH awareness day! Lai's 
ceiebr*te lootght with Sweet Sassafras* 1 169) 

THE FOLLOWING people have not picked up 1978 Royal Pur 
pies-get them In Kedzle 103 Maeeoud Chltsaz. Lynn D, 
Christie. Douglas Cleeseen, Crista C. Clark, Steven F. 
Clark, Brent M. Clark. Timothy Cleary, Richard T. Clem- 
mom . Sean Cllpsham. (89-7 1) 



NOTICES 



MANHATTAN PAWN Shop, 317 S. 4th Street, 774 
61 12-*ter«oe. 8-iracks, TV's, typewriters, guitars, 
cameras. Buy sell-trade (3-75) 

SHIPPING OVERSEAS after graduation? Call Overseas Ship 
ping Consultants tor rate* and free estimate 7745213, 
Box 845, Manhattan (8478) 

ATTENTION SNOWSKIIERS: There are atlll four place* 
available on a student bus trip to Winter Park, Colorado. 
January 8-15. Everything included except food and booze 
lorSdays of skll ng -only 8200, call 7741743.(89-71) 

BERGGREN STUDIO sale, ceramics and painting*. Saturday, 
December 9, from 9O0a.m.-5O0 p.m. 1701 Sheffield, (take 
Kimball lo Hudson, then south to Sheffield), or call 534 
3035 for appointment. (6471) 

IF YOU aecldenlty picked up my green backpack in the Union 
Monday, please return It, or contents, to Boyd Hall front 
deed— no question*! Thank*. (69-70) 

THE FOLLOWING people have not picked up 1978 Royal Pur- 
ples—get them in Kedzle 103 Masaoud Chltsaz, Lynn O. 
Christie. Douglas Claassen, Crisis C- Clark, Steven F 
Clark, Brent M. Clark. Timothy Cleary, Richard T. Clem- 
mons, Sean Cllpsham. (69-71) 



WANTED 



MALE TWENTY phi* lo a hare recently remodeled home on 
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lo do his part to keep It clean. 5394208. (8549) 

CHRISTIAN ROOMMATE tor spring term Call 539-1513 ask 
for John. (6472) 

THREE TICKETS lor Cat Pdy— Pomona B-Ball game Decem- 
ber 9. Call 7741 247. (6471) 



LOST 



BLUE BACKPACK In Derby Food Center Including 
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FOUND 



FEMALE GERMAN Shepherd pup 12 weeks old, at Manhat- 
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CALCULATOR CLAIM and identify In Weber i 17 (6470) 



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PERSONAL 



SENIORS— DON T forget Friday's big TGIF party at Dark 
Horse Tavern. Dec. 8, 140 p.m 4:00 p.m. (67-71) 

TO ALL my Mends of Irlends of Irtends, Vienna Choir Boys, 
Iranians DJ.'s, Alro- Americans, French, Msxlcens. 
Cowboy*, Chinese. Ho*s, Pirates, Obscene Callers with 
Asthma, Pollacks snd Joe American, thanka lor making my 
19th graatl Paula (89) 

MARJORIE 254-The day has finally come, but don'l worry, 
you're not over the hill yet I Tee He*. Happy B-day— M&M 

m 

LUCKENBACH: TUNA philosophy ol the day; QoirV fishing, 
Instead ot Just a wishing. Love, Rocket Lady. (69) 

JEAN, MONET, snd Sally; Men of MASH am waiting For nur- 
se* we are dating A fun time you'll need not beg. from 
doctors Jim, Don a. * Greg. (69) 

ROBIN, WHAT can I say? Have I no date for lhat day? When 
will you hear my plea? You're Ihe one lor mel (69) 

BIG T.-get Ihe rewerd ready big boy. 85,000 will alip easily 
into my fingers. Little S. (69) 

STRAWBERRY KIDS— bring on the Christmas cheer and 
mistletoe and lei's party hardy' Merry Chrratmast DAC. (69) 

LITTLE BROTHERS Kevin and Todd: Congratulations on ac- 
tivation It Recovered from Ihe week-end? Love, your Big 
SIS. (891 

DEE: THANKS for a greet lime at the SSI! I'll never torget II. 
BP. (69) 



tl - 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W6., Oacwnbw I, IfW 



Cron kite, et. al. 

slated for lectures 

I 



Shirley Temple Black, Sen. Howard Baker of Tennessee, Nobel 
Prize winner Norman Borlaug and Walter Cronkite of CBS ail have 
agreed to appear at K-State this spring as Landon Lecture 
speakers, 

K-State Assistant to the President Barry Flinchbaugh said 
Tuesday that Baker is scheduled to sneak on March 8 with Borlaug 
to appear on March 20 and Black on April 10. 

According to Flinchbaugh, Cronkite has committed himself to 
appear but no definite date has been set. He said Cronkite 's con- 
tract with CBS demands his presence in New York Monday through 
Friday, so a Saturday lecture is being negotiated. Flinchbaugh 
added a Saturday will he sought when students are in Manhattan 
and can attend the lecture. 

Black is best known as the curlv-haired child star of 1930s films, 



and more recently as a special U.S. envoy to the United Nations. 

Baker, the Senate minority leader and 1980 presidential hopeful, 
will arrive in Manhattan as part of a spring speaking tour in the 
Midwest. 

Borlaug won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970 and is known as the 
"father of the green revolution" for his research and work with 
wheat. 

Cronkite has been with CBS since 1950 and is now managing 
editor and anchorman of CBS Evening News. He also worked in 
Europe and Asia during and after World War II. 

Even though the first speaker will not arrive until mid -semester, 
Flinchbaugh said he was pleased with the schedule. 
"We take 'em when we can get 'em," he said. 



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TOPEKA, KS ( ' ';: 






EXCII 




Kansas State 

Collegian 



Thursday 

December 7, 1978 
Kansas State University 

Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol.85, No. 70 



On 1 n tf*h ■ HtkV fesues guidelines 
Or U I1UII. f 0r athletic budgeting 



On the spot 



Stall pnoto by Craig Chandler 



Julie Jacobs (left), sophomore in health, physical 
education and recreation, spots for Karen Purcell as 
she attempts a back handspring. Purcell, a Manhattan 
7th grader, is enrolled in the Beginning Advanced 
Gymnastics course sponsored by K- State's Depart-^ 
ment of Continuing Education. 



Colleges and universities may now be required to 
spend the same amount per capita on women's sports 
as they do on men's, with the exception of football, the 
federal government announced Wednesday. 

Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) Secretary 
Joseph Califano said under most circumstances a 
college or university would have to begin immediately 
to spend substantially the same amount on each 
woman participating in athletics as it spends on each 
man. 

Califano said, however, the new policy would permit 
differences in expenditures based on what he called 
"non-discriminatory factors, such as the cost of a 
particular sport, for example, the equipment required 
or the scope of competition. ' ' 

DeLoss Dodds, K -St ate athletic director, said he is 
unsure exactly what Califano's new policy is requiring. 

"The way I understand it, football is exempt, but 
everything will be financed equally whether it be done 
by a head count or whether it be done according to the 
same men's and women's sports," he said. 

Dodds said, however, he thought the question of 
equal financing for revenue and non-revenue sports is 
still up in the air. 

"Say men's tennis produces $50,000 more a year than 
it costs to maintain the program, and women's tennis 
does not produce any revenue— there is still a question 
as to whether these sports should be financed equally," 
he said. 

JACK HARTMAN, K-State men's basketball coach, 
said he did not understand the ramifications of the new 
policy, and would not comment until he did. 

However, Hartman told the Manhattan Mercury 
Wednesday he thought the new policy was 
"ridiculous." 

"The federal government has no business making 
blanket regulations for all university athletic depar- 



tments. There is such contrasting potential to raise 
revenue. For example, at K-State we are hard-put to 
support the existing programs," he said. 

Judy Ackers, K-State women's basketball coach, 
was unavailable for comment Wednesday. 

HEW said the latest figures indicate about 300,000 of 
the 400,000 students participating in intercollegiate 
athletics are men and, on the average, colleges and 
universities provide 10 sports for women and only six 
for men. 

Phyllis Bailey, assistant athletic director at Ohio 
State University, said the operating budget to 18 men's 
sports at Ohio State is $4,064,614, including football, 
and $601,043 for the 12 women's sports. 

THE OHIO STATE men's basketball team of 134 
players flew to Knoxville, Tenn. , last Saturday night on 
a charter. Tuesday night, the 12-member women's 
team will be going to Tennessee by chartered bus. But 
athletic officials point out that the men's team drew 
12,000 fans for its home opener against Miami, Ohio, 
creating more than $30,000 in revenue. Meanwhile, the 
women's home opener attracted 570 fans, taking in 
$900. 

The government said they would grant up to three 
years for schools to start affirmative action programs 
to encourage women to join in athletic competition. 

Joel Eaves, athletic director at Georgia, said the 
university would have to find nearly $1 million more 
each year to finance across-the-board increases in 
women's athletics if budget allocations are based on 
percentages of male and female team members. 
Georgia currently has 221 men and 80 women in in- 
tercollegiate competition. 

"This will not necessarily result in identical men's 
and women's intercollegiate athletic programs," the 
government said . 



Ahearn: home of...? Senate will vote tonight 



By KENT GASTON 

Staff Writer 

Student Senate will vote tonight to decide 
if K-State students should be asked to help 
fund a new home for Wildcat basketball. 

This is the second time a referendum has 
been written which would increase student 
fees to help pay for an arena to replace 
Ahearn Field House. Lasl February, a 
similar referendum was declared invalid 
because less than one-third of the student 
Ixidy voted. 

If senate OKs the referendum tonight, 
students will vote in February on a $10 per- 
semester increase designed to raise about 
$2.5 million toward a new facility to house 
men's and women's basketball, concerts, 
convocations and intercollegiate athletic 
offices. 

One strong proponent of a new fieldhouse 
is Brian Hassette, chairman of the com- 
mittee which wrote the referendum and 



researched K state's need for a new facility, 
which some say isconsiderable. 

Head basketball coach Jack Hartman said 
K-State 's basketball tradition can't continue 
in Ahearn. 

"I think we're at the crossroads," Har- 
tman said. "We can't continue to have great 
basketball under existing conditions," he 
said. 

HOWEVER, some feel the advantages of 
Ahearn outweigh the benefits of a new 
arena. 

"The acoustics and the closeness of fans to 
the action in Ahearn are unmatched in the 
costly new fieldhouses of our competitor 
Let's keep that edge," said Bernd Foerster, 
dean of the College of Architecture and 
Design in a letter to the Collegian. 

"The sentimental value of Ahearn is great 
because the basketball tradition is great," 
he said. "But, if we don't get a new facility, 



the sentimental value of Ahearn will go 
down, for the simple reason that our ex- 
cellent basketball tradition can't continue in 
that facility." 

"Sentimental value can be created in a 
new facility," Rasselte said. The acoustics 
of a new facility can funnel the sound down 
to the court but still allow the use of tem- 
porary sound -absorbing walls and moveable 
ceiling for concerts, according to the ar- 
chitect Rassette consulted. 

The price tag for such a facility w aid be 
about $9.9 million, Rassette said. The 
referendum provides for a 15,000-seat arena, 
and the cost goes up $300,000 for every 1,000 
additional seats over 15,000, he said. 

HARTMAN SAID he favors the 15,000 to 
16,000 range, because Ahearn simply isn't 
big enough. 

Rassette said more than 500 students and 
400 alumni were unable to purchase tickets 
last year. 



Ahearn was built in 1950 to seat 13,400. 
Remodeling has lowered the capacity to 
11,200. 

Size is not Ahearn 's only problem, ac- 
cording to Hartman. Recruiting is more 
(See FIELDHOUSE, p. 6) 



Inside 



Student financing not new to Big 8 



The idea of students funding a new basketball arena is not 
peculiar to K -Stale —other Big 8 schools have done the same thing. 

Iowa Stale University students contributed 15 percent of the 
funding of its 14,300-seat arena, completed in 1975 at a cost of $7.5 
million. The other 85 percent was from private gifts. 

The University of Oklahoma completed its $4 million Lloyd Noble 
Arena in 1975 with 39 percent student funds, 32 percent alumni 
contributions and about 29 percent athletic department funds. 

The University of Missouri's $11 million Hearnes Center was 
funded by $7.65 million from the Missouri Legislature and $3,35 
million from students. 

And, the University of Nebraska has the newest facility in the 
conference, housing both basketball and an indoor track. The 
basketball portion cost $9 million and the rest of the facility cost 
about $5 million. Twelve million dollars was raised from a 
statewide 5-cent cigarette tax, and the rest came from interest on 
the tax. 

STUDENT BODY President Sam Brownback is working on a 
cigarette tax proposal for Kansas to help fund a new facility at IE- 
Stale. But, it's not as practical as in Nebraska, according to Brian 



Rassette, chairman of the Student Senate committee looking into 
the fieldhouse question, because Nebraska has only one state in- 
stitution while Kansas has several. 

Brownback also has met with Kansas legislators to try to find out 
what chances K-State would have of obtaining funding from the 
Legislature. 

"1 talked with (Kansas Senator) John Stites last week, and he 
said a summary of the Legislature's attitude is that they're willing 
to help those who help themselves," Brownback said. 

However, students at Fort Hays State University are "helping 
themselves" with their athletic facilities. They are paying $3.50 per 
credit hour every semester to help pay for their rec complex and 
Gross Coliseum. A student taking 15 hours would pay $105 a year, 
and the average is about $126 per year, according to Dave Kasper, 
treasurer of Fort Hays' student government. 

A student referendum in 1968 provided for the student funding, 
and the $7 million structure was opened in 1973, according to 
Kasper. 

The students get free admission to Fort Hays football and 
basketball games. 



STUDENTS WHO didn't gel spring 
schedules in the mail can pick up 
duplicate copies in Anderson Hall before 
drop-add starts Monday. Details, page 

2... 

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY to Head 
Coach Jim Dickey- who came to K-State 
one year ago promising to restore "fun" 
to Wildcat football. See the story and 
pictures, page II... 




Jim Dickey 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurs,, December 7, 1978 



Computer mix up 
scrambles schedules 



By TODD SHERLOCK 
Collegian Reporter 

As many as 1,500 K-State students could 
be temporarily without their spring 
semester class schedules, according to 
Jerald Dallam, associate dean of 
Admissions and Records. 

Due to a computer mix-up, some 
schedules were sent to students* home 
addresses, rather than to the appropriate 
Manhattan addresses. Drop-add period 
begins Monday and those students who did 
not receive schedules may pick copies up at 
Farrell Library today, Ellsworth Gerritz, 
dean of Admissions a nd Records , sa id . 

"In order to provide all students who have 
enrolled for spring semester with their 
assignments before the drop-add period 
begins Monday, a duplicated set of 
assignments had been prepared and will be 



available in the registration area in the 
library basement (today) from 1 to 5 p.m. 
and continuing from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. 
Due to a computer operator error, one out 
of three transfer students or new freshmen 
students for the spring semester had 
schedules mailed to the wrong address, 
according to Jerald Dallam, associate 
director of admissions and records. 

The second error involved a breakdown 
with the optica] scanning machine used to 
read the pre-enrollment forms causing 
courses to be incorrectly listed, 

"We detected this breakdown within one 
hour after the machine began reading the 
forms," Dallam said. "We have since then 
called the company that manufactures the 
machine to take it back if they cannot 
guarantee the machine to read properly." 



Cam pus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
THE INTERNATIONAL CHRISTMAS PARTY IS at J p.m. 
Friday in Ine Inter nation a I Student Center, all students are 
invited. 

A SMC CHRISTMAS BANQUET is Friday; ticket* are 

available in Sea ion I0S. 

F RU IT CAKES are now on sale In Shel lenberger 101 

A SUMMER EMPLOYMENT ORIENTATION meeting Is 
scheduled for 3 SO p.m. today in Kediie IDA, any student 
interested In summer employment is Invited. 

phi ALPHA THETA will be selling Unieef Christmas 
cards in the Union today 10 a. m. 2 p. m. 

TODAY 

A TCh ' E" will meet In Denison 113 A at 4730 p.m. 

BUMPATHON EXECUTIVE BOARD Will meet at tti« 
Alpha Ch! Omega House al J p.m, 

ALPHA EPSILON RHO will meet in McCain 325 at 7 p.m, 

RHOMATE S will meet al the Alpha Gamma R no House al 
9 p.m. 

Collegian editor, 
ad manager chosen 

Julie Doll and Terry Brungardt were 
selected Wednesday to serve as spring 
semester Collegian editor and advertising 
manager, respectively. 

Doll, senior in journalism and mass 
communications, worked as staff writer and 
campus bulletin coordinator this semester. 

Brungardt, senior in journalism and mass 
communications, was reappointed to the 
post he now holds. 

Doll said staff applications are available 
in Kedzie 103 and are due Wednesday. 



NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT CLUB will meet 
In Call Ml at 7pm 

ALPHA KAPPA PSI will meet in Union 209 at 7 p.m. 

KANSAS ASSOCIATION OF NURSING STUDENTS Will 
meet in Union 203 at 7 p. m. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS will meet at 7-20 p.m. in 
Seaton before leaving on the Jeffreys Energy Center tour. 

ATO LITTLE SISTERS will meat at the ATO House at S-W 

p.m 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CLUB Will meet In Aekert 221 

et7p.m.. Eugenia Sullivan will weak. 

FORESTRY CLUB Will meet in Call 204 al 7-W p.m. 

BETA SIGMA PSI LITTLE SISTERS will meet at the Beta 
Sig House at J p.m. 

AED will meet in Eisenhower IS al 7 p.m. 

SWEETHEARTS OF THE SHIELD AND DIAMOND will 
meet at the Pike House at 6-» p.m. 

K-STATE GERMAN CLUB will meet in Union 204 all p.m. 

ICTHUS FELLOWSHIP will meet in the basement of St. 
Isidore's at B-30 p.m. 

PRE-VET CLUB will meet in the auditorium in the new 
Veterinary Clinic Building at 7 pm. tor elections ol officers 
and to hear Gary Clarke, director ol the Topeka 2oo. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERS will meet m Seaton 33* at 7-W p.m 

NONDENOMINATIONAL COMMUNION SERVICE is In 

Danlorth Chapel at 4-W p.m. 

KSU CHESS CLUB will meet in Union 301 J 10 p m 

DAUGHTERS OF DIANA will meet at the TKE House at T 
p m 

TAU BETA PI will meet in Seaton lot at A-» p m 

FRIDAY 
KANSAS ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT SOCIAL 
WORKERS will meet in Union 204 at 10 a.m. 

CAMPUS SCOUT CAMPOUT is in Ford Hall lobby at 5 
p.m. 





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BATTERY SALE 



46 Month 
Maaitenance Free 




'FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES' 



Interested persons are invited to share in beginning a new 
F.C.A. Chapter. 

On Friday, December 8, 1978 at 6:30 p.m. an F.C.A, supper at 
The First Presbyterian Church, 8th & Leavenworth. 
For reservation please call 537-0518. 



International Christmas Festival 



7:00 Friday, Dec 8 





International Student Center 

All Students Welcome 

Refreshments wilt be provided 

Tree trimmings and a program on how Christmas 

Is celebrated in other countries is planned. 

Sponsored by: ICC, Spurs, Phi Upsilon Omicron, UFM 




k 



-MAS HOURS AT WARD M. KELLERS AND KELLERS TOO 
Starting Dec. Ilth Mon. thru Kri. 9:30-8:30 
Saturday 9:30-5:30 Open Sundays Dec. 3rd. 1 0th & 17th l-5p.m. 



/ 



> 



Briefly 



Jones 9 sons return to U.S. fearful 

NEW YORK— Seventeen more American survivors of the Peoples 
Temple murder-suicide— two of them sons of sect leader the Rev. 
Jim Jones— returned to the United States under armed escort 
Wednesday night. 

They were penniless, some of them fearing they were returning to 
1a nation that would be hateful and revenge-seeking for events in- 
volving their cult and the deaths of more than 900 sect members at a 
commune in Jonestown, Guyana. 

Tight security ringed Kennedy Airport as the Pan American plane 
touched down an hour behind schedule. The survivors, none of which 
were in Jonestown at the time of the deaths, were kept aboard the 
aircraft while more than 100 other passengers got off. Six U.S. sky 
marshals flew with them. 

Federal officials entered the plane, herded the survivors out a 
back door and onto waiting buses, which sped away to an unknown 
destination. There was speculation that the latest returnees were 
treated differently because they included Jones' two adopted sons, 
Jim and Tim. 

Homosexual case to be reopened 

NEW YORK— A federal appeals court Wednesday ordered the Air 
Force to reopen the case of Leonard Matlovich, who was discharged 
in 1975 after acknowledging he was a homosexual. 

The appeals court made a similar ruling in the case of a Navy 
ensign. 

Matlovich's discharge prompted nationwide protests from the gay 
community and Matlovich, now living in San Francisco, became a 
prominent spokesman for gay rights. 

The three-judge panel reversed an earlier ruling by U.S. District 
Judge Gerhard Gesell, who had upheld the discharge on grounds 
that there is no constitutional right to engage in homosexual activity. 

In an opinion written by Judge Oscar Davis, the appeals court said 
it does not challenge the right of the Air Force to discharge 
homosexuals. 

But Davis said the Air Force had failed to give a "specific reason" 
why Matlovich should not have fallen under an exemption that 
allows some homosexuals to stay in the service. 

There was no immediate word on what step the Air Force will now 
take or whether the government will appeal the decision to the 
Supreme Court. 

Omaha runway crash kills 7 

OMAHA, Neb.— At least seven persons were killed Wednesday 
when a DC-6 exploded and slammed into a Missouri River dike at the 
end of a runway as it was taking off, officials said. 

It was not immediately known if there were more than seven 
persons aboard the plane. Omaha Public Safety Director Bill 
McDonnell said an airport official told him he saw 11 persons board 
the plane, but that report could not be confirmed. 

There also were early, unconfirmed reports that some of those 
aboard may be members of a 45-person Mexican agricultural 
delegation touring irrigation manufacturing plants in Nebraska for 
the last week. 

Jim Schmidt of the Omaha Public Safety Communications 
Department confirmed that all aboard were killed. 

A witness, Sharon Reynolds of Omaha, said she was driving along 
the levee at the end of Eppley Airfield's north side when she saw a 
"pinkish, purple ball of light that turned into something looking like 
a harvest moon." 

"I saw it explode in the air (about 50 feet off the ground). Then it 
hit on the side of the levee," Reynolds said. 

Martin packs a $20,000 wallop 

RENO, Nev.— Billy Martin and a Reno sportswriter will square off 
in court over a fight last month. 

Ray Hagar, a reporter for the Nevada State Journal, filed a suit 
Tuesday against the former manager of the New York Yankees 
seeking damages in connection with a Nov. 10 incident in which 
Martin punched Hagar. 

The suit claims Martin assaulted Hagar with "no provocation or 
offense" while Hagar was interviewing him. 

Hagar, who suffered three broken teeth and a black eye, is asking 
$10,000 in general damages and $10,000 in punitive damages. 

The morning after the incident, Hagar said Martin hit him at least 
twice before trying to grab his notes. Martin has said it appeared the 
reporter was going to thmw a punch "before I hit him." 



WeatFer 



Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow.... A travelers' advisory has been 
issued for today, as snow accumulations will reach up to three inches 
by midday. Occasional snow flurries will continue until tonight. 
Highs today will be in the mid to upper 20s. Highs Friday will be 
around 20. 



ooooooooc 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurt., Dtcwwbf 7, 19f$ 



MfTHERf 



oooooooooo. 





HOW OF THE K-STATE BUMM-1H0N 

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MUSIC STORE 



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COUPON 



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Bring in and receive 
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(Offer expires Dec. 31, 1978 and does not 
include items already discounted) . 



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Across from Kites- Aggieville 539-2009 




Every Thursday 

K.S.U. I.D. DAY 

Welcome 
Students, Faculty, Staff 

Show Your KSU I.D. 

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Open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Daily 




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Opinions 



A slap in the face 

K-State "rocked the old barn" Tuesday night— as Coach Jack 
Hartmanputit. "The old barn".... 

Student senators will act on the future of "the old barn," when they 
vote tonight on a referendum to raise about $2.5 million in student 
fees for construction of an all-purpose fieldhouse. 

Hart man's "old barn" comment was most likely aimed at con- 
juring negative images of Ahearn Field House in the minds of 
student senators. He is fully aware that if the referendum escapes 
with senate's blessing, it will face an easier task— approval by K- 
State's basketball-delirious student body in February's elections. 

Student Senate has a tremendous responsibility on its shoulders 
tonight and we can only hope the senators do not get swept away by 
K -State's basketball mania. 

The educational priorities of senate and students must be more 
realistic than to spend millions to construct a fieldhouse at a time 
when many campus buildings are in dire need of help. 

Problems at Seaton and Willard Halls have surfaced frequently 
this semester. Calvin Hall stands as an accident ready to happen. 
Nichols Gym continues to serve only as a snow fence. Where will this 
madness end? 

Passage of the fieldhouse referendum would be a slap in the face to 
all aging buildings on campus, as well as to the educational needs of 
the University. 

The price of this type of "progress" is simply too much for the 
University and the already over-burdened student fees to bear. 
Student Senate must withstand the pro-basketball pressures and say 
"No," and retain the tradition of Ahearn. 

Hartman was correct when he said K-State "rocked the old barn" 
Tuesday night. But rather than conjuring negative images, students 
must visualize Ahearn as the basketball mecca it really is. 

Speaking as one of Tuesday's 11,000 barn-rockers, Ahearn Field 
House never looked or sounded better. 

The "old barn" is as much a part of K-State tradition as the 
University's warm and friendly atmosphere, Purple Pride and "The 
Wabash Cannonball. " 

Ahearn stands as a beacon to welcome students and alumni back 
for another winter of basketball excitement and K-State solidarity. 

Ahearn, aging limestone walls and all, is the home of K-State 
basketball tradition and support. This is one house not for sale. 

MICHAEL HURD 
Staff Writer 

Just following orders 



The only things students learn in school is 
how to take orders. 

That bit of wisdom comes from Jerry 
Farber's "Student as Nigger," and although 
it's an exaggeration, the thought does 
deserve consideration . 

Too often, instructors think for their 
students instead of requiring students to use 



lulie Doir 



their own reasoning facilities— also known 
as brains. Filling students' minds with facts, 
figures and opinions is probably easier for 
both students and instructors than 
demanding students to think. However, both 
parties would learn more if students 
thought, and instructors widened their 
sometimes narrowed paths of opinions. 

From grade one, we are told what to do 
and how to do it; "Paint a tree and do it like 
this and make sure it's brown with green 
leaves." The orders get a little more 
complex as we grow older, and pretty soon, 
we don't even need explicit orders, we know 
what teachers want to hear and we tell 
them. 

If an instructor wants to hear that the 
Russian invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968 
was an imperialistic act, that's what we tell 
him. 



Ka £% Collegia™ 

Thursday, December 7, 1978 

THE COLLEGIAN is published by Student 
Publications. Inc., Kansas Stale university, daily 
except Saturday, Sundays, Holidays and vacation 
periods 

OFFICES are In trie north wing ot Kedlie Mall, phone 
S3I6MJ 

SECOND CLASS postage paid at Manhattan. Kansas 
MM. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: SIS. one calendar year, 
S7 50, one semester 

THE COiLEOIAN (unctions in a leoally autonomous 
relationship with the University and is written ana 
edited by students serving the University community 

Paul Rhodes, Editor 
Terry Brungardt. Adverlninq Manager 



Whether Russia is imperialistic is one of 
many debatable topics. Debatable topics 
should be open to debate. Asking students to 
regurgitate an instructor's opinion is not 
advancing the student's education. An in- 
structor's opinions are not gospel, and a 
student's opinions should not be ignored, nor 
should students be punished or threatened 
with the almighty grade card for expressing 
an opinion or idea. 

Granted, instructors usually have more 
experience and knowledge on the subject 
being studied than the student, but that 
doesn't supersede a student's opinion. 

Many of you probably think Farber is 
completely off base, but anyone who takes a 
close look at this University can readily 
determine that it is valid, at least to a 
degree. 

I've known students who pile adjective 
upon adjective in an effort to lengthen their 
too-short term paper to the required 10 
pages. For some reason, it has never 
bothered me to turn in seven or eight pages 
when I was supposed to have 10, but then I 
thought my English Comp I teacher was 
completely out of line when she demanded 
that we fold our themes in half and put a 
paragraph of information in the upper right 
hand corner before handing them in. 

I guess it shouldn't have come as any 
surprise. In high school a science teacher 
tojd all the girls in class to include their 
telephone numbers when they turned in 
their tests; he said he might need a 
babysitter. Although everyone in the class 
knew the lecher was divorced and that his 
ex -wife had custody of their two kids, most 
of the girls gave him their phone numbers. 

The unquestioning attitude of students is 
frightening. It may also explain why cult 
leaders can so readily recruit members. If 
students would think for themselves and be 
responsible for those thoughts, not only 
would they question the expertise of their 
instructors but the validity of cult leader's 
claims and politicians' promises. 

In college, students should be thinking, 
questioning and learning. College should not 
be the programming of a human mind. 




Boring is better 



Everyday life gets pretty ordinary. 
Advertisers are always promising their 
products will spruce things up by making 
our lives more exciting, our romances more 
fascinating, our bodies more appealing and 
our personalities more enticing. I'd like to 



Susan Brinlc 



know what's so wrong with good old down- 
to-earth boring. 

Look at it this way. First, because boring 
people are dependable, there's security in 
being boring. There's never any doubt that 
the boring person is going to be around 
tomorrow, and the next day, and the next, 
and so on, just the same as he or she has 
always been. It's not a whole lot of fun, but 
it's secure. 

Second, being boring is cut and dried. 
There are never any big decisions to make, 
because life goes on pretty much from day 
to day just as it always has. 

Probably the biggest decision of the 
boring person's day is whether to have 
French or thousand island dressing on his 
chef's salad at lunch. (There's no major 
decision about the chef's salad— that's what 
he always has. ) The day's second biggest 
decision is whether to watch Lawrence Welk 
or finish that high school scrapbook he's 
been working on for 7'^ years. (Lawrence 
Welk usually wins out. ) 

Third, boring is healthy. Boring people 
always get eight hours of sleep each 
night— no more and no less. (To be specific, 
they go to bed at 10:30 p.m. and get up at 
6 : 30 a . m . > They a re repulsed by the mention 



of a Big Mac and nauseated at the thought of 
a Hostess Twinkie. 

They eat health foods and are on strict 
2000-calorie-a-day diets. They never 
jog— that's "in." Instead, for exercise, they 
enthusiastically involve themselves in a 
rousing nightly game of chess with whoever 
they can talk into playing. 

Boring people have certain common 
traits. They always wear pajamas to bed. 
They always put on the right sock and shoe 
before the left sock and shoe. They read 
Dear Abby before the comics. They are 
eternal optimists, fond of saying things like, 
"Don't worry, dear. It'll all work out for the 
best." 

However, their optimism never prevents 
them from being safe. Safety always comes 
first. For that reason, they carry umbrellas 
and wear raincoats when the weatherman 
reports a four percent chance of rain. They 
brush their teeth with baking soda. They 
never unscrew their Oreo cookies. 

They give savings bonds for Christmas. 
Their idea of a big night on the town is eating 
supper on TV trays in the living room, 
followed by working a week's worth of 
crossword puzzles by the light of the lamp 
above the kitchen table. And, without fail, 
they order vanilla ice cream at Baskin- 
Robbins. 

Boring people are the advertising 
market's ruin because they seem to be 
pretty satisfied with their everyday or- 
dinary lives. They seem to be confident 
about who they are without the "security" 
advertisers offer them. Maybe it's boring, 
but they've found their niche. 



Letters 



Lapses of judgment 



Editor, 



There seems to be some misun- 
derstanding about the issues that have been 
raised about sportsmanship. A few of our 
fans have had lapses of judgment that were 
encouraged for an unfortunate moment by 
"Willie." 

When it is pointed out that the waving of 
arms to distract shooters should be left to 
poor sports at other universities, this does 
not mean that cheering of the Wildcat teams 
should be reduced. When it is suggested that 
it is both inappropriate and unproductive to 



boo opposing teams without 
cause— sometimes even before play has 
started— that does not diminish our right to 
encourage our own teams. 

It is great to have crowd support, 
especially when it is enhanced by the ad- 
vantageous conditions of Ahearn Field 
House. The acoustics and the closeness of 
the fans to the action in Ahearn are un- 
matched in the costly new fieldhouses of our 
competitors. Let's keep that edge. 

Bernd Foerster 
dean of architecture 



Lift KSDB out of the muck 



Editor, 

I write with reference to Faculty Advisor 
Bob Fidler's letter defending our local 
university radio station (KSDB). He says 
the station must have a "popular program," 
and that alternative programming might 
have a "very small audience." Evidently 
this is the reason our station copies the 
crude programming of commercial radio. 

Let me ask this question: Why must a 
university -sponsored activity lower itself to 
appeal to the lowest common denominator 
of taste? If popularity is the principle the 
university should follow, then what about 
other activities? 



For the McCain auditorium program 
series we might sponsor stripper shows and 
vaudeville acts. For convocation speakers 
we should have currently popular football 
and basketball stars. For popular textbooks 
we could use Playboy and People 
magazines. 

A university radio station should seek to 
elevate standards, not pander to popular 
taste. Where are our university leaders? 
Surely they have the clout to lift KSDB out of 
the muck. 

Timothy Johnson 
freshman in agriculture 



> 



V 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurs., December 7, 1978 



9 



Consumer SleutR 



A lesson in shopping awaits consumers in 
the Dillon's food store on Turtle Creek 
Boulevard today, with special emphasis on 
unit pricing and label reading. 

The program, a class project for the 
College of . Home Economics' community 
nutrition class, will be held from 3 to 8 p.m. 

"Unit pricing," according to Stana Hurd, 
graduate student in Foods and Nutrition and 
co-chairperson for the project, "is an easy 
way for consumers to tell what is the best 
buy for the money. 

"We're hoping that, by pointing this out, 
people will start looking for it," Hurd said. 

The display will include posters, pam- 
phlets and informal discussions with trained 
class members ready to field questions, 
Hurd said. 

AS THE semester break approaches and 
many students are planning a change of 
residence, several provisions of the Lan- 
dlord-Tenant Act should be kept in mind. 

Whether or not there is a written 
agreement between the tenant and the 
landlord, an oral agreement still binds both 
parties to abide by the act. 

If any damages occur on the property 
which are not the tenant's fault, the Lan- 
dlord-Tenant Act provides that they must be 
reported to the manager so the damages 
won't be charged against the security 
deposit. This should be done in writing 
before the contract termination date. 

If a landlord retains part of the deposit, 
the law requires that a written, itemized list 
of deductions be sent to the tenant no later 
than 30 days after termination and return of 
the keys, along with the remainder of the 
deposit. If the landlord fails to comply with 
this, the tenant is entitled to recover 
damages equal to the amount owed plus 1 Vz 
times the amount improperly withheld from 
him. 

And unless otherwise provided in the lease 
agreement, a tenant who uses the security 
deposit as rental payment forfeits the 
deposit and is still liable for the amount of 
the rent. 

There has been some confusion on the 
subject of interest on security deposits. 
Under Kansas law, interest on this deposit is 
not required. 

What procedure should be followed to 
assure a reasonable return of the security 
deposit? 

First, make sure the landlord has a 
current address to which the deposit may be 

sent. 

Next, clean the apartment, house or room 
thoroughly. Vacuum cleaners rent for 
between $3.50 and $8 per day at local rental 
firms. A vacuum plus a small arsenal of 
supplies (window and oven cleaners, etc.) 
should make the small investment worth it. 

Finally, turn the key in along with a 



written request for the security deposit. This 
can avoid legal hassles later. 

If there are any questions unanswered 
about the legalities described, contact either 
the Student Attorney or the Consumer 
Relations Board, both located on the ground 
floor of the K-State Union in the SGS Office. 



Ch** DARK HORSES 
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PROGRESSIVE PITCHERS 
TONIGHT! 

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THE HOME OF THE GOOD TIMES' 
Wfltere you pay lew for mm 



Correction 



In a story in Wednesday's Collegian, it 
was incorrectly reported that The Federal 
Communications Commission has banned 
10-watt radio stations. The law only requires 
that 10-watt stations which want to continue 
operating at that power make one of two 
alterations in the future, according to Tom 
Tuckwood, KSDB station manager. KSDBis 
a 10-watt station. 





J- 



&\, 



H> 



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Front-End Alignment 

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check suspension end 
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Front wheel drive end 
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e Electronic engine, start- 
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* KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurr, D»c»mb«r 7,1978 

Fieldhouse referendum 
to confront senate 



< continued from p. 1 1 
difficult because of Ahearn, and there is a 
"lack of concern for its appearance," 
Hartmansaid. 

Ahearn's cramped condition also causes 
problems with class scheduling in the 
Department of Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation (HPER) and intramurals, 
Rassette said. 

Ahearn is used more than 136 hours a 
week, and is open 20 hours a day for 10 
months of the year, Rassette said. The 
• complex opens at 6 a.m. and closes at 2 a.m. 
the following day, so the only time for 
maintenance is from 2 a.m. to 6 a.m. 

THE PRESS BOX is also inadequate, 
according to Rassette, as evidenced by the 
K-State-USSR game last year in which eight 
press members were left standing and six 
were turned away. 

Part of the usage problem will be relieved 
by the new recreation complex, according to 
Chet Peters, vice president for student 
affairs. 

However, "Rec Services will still need 
Ahearn after the rec complex is built. It will 
not lessen the load that much," Rassette 
said. 

"The athletic department's departure (to 
a new fieldhouse) would free enough 
space," Don Kirkendall, HPER department 
head, said. "If there were no bleachers and 
more available hours, it would be a 
tremendous boost to us in terms of 
scheduling." 

A compromise solution was brought up 
two years ago to keep the Ahearn tradition 
alive while adding more seats and giving the 
interior a facelift. 

A feasibility study completed in April 1977 
found the cost would be $3,733,000 and would 
increase the capacity to 12,600, about $2,500 
per additional seat. The work would take 12 
to 15 months and all activity inside the 
building would have to stop for at least six 
months. 

BUT MORE important to Rassette, whose 
next -to-priori ly item is concerts, is that 
renovation would not help Ahearn's 
acoustics. 

The plan called for rotating the court 90 
degrees and taking out the balconies. 
Rassette said about eight rows of bleachers 
would be installed at the east and west ends 
of the court, and the seats on the north and 
south would slope up gradually. 

Spectators in the corners would be too far 
from the action, Rassette said. For con- 
certs, either half of the spectators would be 
eliminated, or the band would face east and 
speakers would point toward a large brick 
wall. * 



'it wouldn't be conducive to good 
basketball or good concerts," Rassette said. 

With renovation out of the picture, 
Rassette's committee drew up the 
referendum with only a new fieldhouse in 
mind. The student funds could not be used 
for renovation, he said. 

ALSO, THE student funding would be 
scrapped, according to the referendum, if 
"substantial progress toward funding the 
construction of an arena" hasn't been made 
by other contributors, such as alumni and 
the Kansas Legislature. 

"Substantial progress" hasn't been 
defined specifically by the referendum, 
because it's impossible to tell how fast the 
contributions would come in, according to 
Sam Brownback, student body president. 

If everything goes according to Rassette's 
wishes, the student funding ($5.75 per 
semester for full-time students and 50 cents 
per semester for part-time students) would 
begin retiring 30- year arena construction 
bonds in fall 1981. As soon as the football 
stadium bonds are retired in the fall of 1985, 
the current $4.25 per full-time student and 50 
per part-time student would be assessed to 
the arena, totaling $10 per semester for full- 
time students and $5 for part-time students. 

If the proposal is approved by the student 
body in February, the referendum states, 
"the officers of the Student Governing 
Association will vigorously petition the 
Kansas State University administration and 
other potential contributors for the ad- 
ditional resources needed to build and 
operate the facility," until 1981, when SGA 
would decide if "substantial progress' had 
been made. 

THE K-STATE Student Senate's attempt 
at a-first step toward a new fieldhouse also is 
encountering arguments that K-State 
enrollment may go down and the facility 
won't be needed. 

The $2.5 million figure, however, has 
already taken a possible enrollment decline 
into account, according to Rassette. 
Originally, they had hoped to raise $2.75 or 
$3 million, he said. 

The students will apparently have a 
chance to get their say in the matter, 
although senate could pass the fee increase 
without a student referendum, Rassette 
said. 

"I'm cautiously optimstic," Brownback 
said. "We're just asking the senators to give 
the students the right to put the issue on the 
ballot." 

"We plan to have student involvement in 
the plan from beginning to end," Rassette 
said. "We want to make sure they get what 
they need." 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thura., DcctmbW, 1978 



m 



Senate to get allocations bill 



A bill concerning how money is allocated 
to the Board of Student Publications comes 
before Student Senate tonight, but Student 
Body President Sam Brownback feels the 
bill needs more work before it should be 
voted on. 

The bill states the line item money will be 
automatically allocated to the board to be 
used as it sees fit. 

The bill also states senate can request a 
budget report from the board, and senate 
can raise or lower the line item, thus 
changing the amount of money the board 
gets. 

"This bill has some problems as it stan- 
ds," Brownback said. "It has severe 
loopholes that I don't know if we can get 
around or not." 

BROWNBACK SAID he hopes to refer the 
bill to a committee so the problems in the 
wording and implications can be worked 
out. 



"This will make the Collegian accountable 
to the Board of Student Publications instead 
of only answering to itself," Brownback 
said. "Now all the board does is select the 
Collegian editor, but this would let them 
serve more as a publishers. 

"Senate shouldn't act as a publisher," he 
said. "It only results in a power struggle 
between the press and the government. It's 
not kosher for the government to have any 
control over the press in-this country. 

"What we are trying to do is give the 
Board of Student Publications a clear 
authority rather than have them mess with 
senate," Brownback said. 

Since the board is made up of students 
elected by the student body, money already 
designated for them should go directly to 
them, he said. 

A student referendum, passed in 1973, set 
S3 per student per semester to be given to 
the Board of Student Publications. This 
year, the Board of Student Publications 
received $84,381 from student fees. 



Don't fill 'er up— unleaded gasoline 
may double in price or be rationed 



WASHINGTON (AP) -Alfred Kahn, the 
Carter administration's chief inflation 
fighter, said Wednesday Ihe government 
soon may have to choose between rationing 
unleaded gasoline or doubling its price. 

Kahn, chairman of the Council on Wage 
and Price Stability, said a panel of 
economists should have a report ready 
within a week on how the shortage of 
unleaded fuel and steady price increases in 
home heating oil will affect the fight against 
inflation. 

But, Kahn added that he's already decided 
for himself that the reason for the spot 
shortages of unleaded gasoline— which most 
late-model cars require— is continuation of 
government controls over the price of 
gasoline and other fuels. 

Conceding that "the tension between the 
inflation problem on one hand and the 
energy problem on the other is tearing us 
apart," he added. "In the long run I believe 
the government has to let the price of energy 
go up." 

THE LONGER the domestic price of oil is 
held below the world market price, the 
sharper the increase will be when controls 
finally end, Kahn said, adding: "There's no 
way I can resolve that dilemma. 1 can't find 
a panacea." 

Contractor Boyd 
to speak today 

Raymond Boyd, vice president. Inter- 
national Division, Blount International Ltd., 
will deliver presentations in the Manhattan 
area today. 

Boyd will speak at 4:30 p.m. in Kedzie Hall 
106. His topic will be "A Look at Inter- 
national Construction." At 8 p.m., Boyd will 
speak at the Manhattan Country Club on 
"Business in the International Market." 

Blount is the 35th largest contractor of 400 
ranked by Engineering News Record. His 
firm is presently constructing a $3 billion, 
12-million-square-foot university in Saudi 
Arabia. 



BUSINESS SENIORS 

Interested in Resume Booklet 

Pick Up Data Sheet For 

CBA Resume Booklet In 

Dean's Office In Calvin 

By Wed., Dec. 13th 

Have Them In 
By Fri., Dec. 15th 

(Form Is Identical To 
Placement Centers) 



Kahn testified before the congressional 
Joint Economic Committee, which is in- 
vestigating whether President Carter's 
program of voluntary wage and price 
guidelines has a chance of success against 
inflation. 

Rep. Margaret Heckler (R-Mass.) told 
Kahn that many Americans have trouble 
understanding why the government is 
fighting price increases in every business 
except the oil industry. 

She said recent price increases for heating 
oil already had led to one incident of 
violence against an oil company in 
Massachusetts. 




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(Ute union bookstore 

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That's right! The Union Bookstore's used 
book program saved K-State students better 
than $250,000.00 this year. That's more than 
$13.60 a student! How did we do it? By using com 
mon sense Instead oi sending big checks off to 
the publishers for our textbook stock, we prefer 
to put it in your hands in cash when we buy your 
books. It makes sense, the savings add up fast, 
and what's more, we've been doing it for you for 
years As a result, the average student's book ex- 
penses are reduced by about one-fifth. 

Here are the details First, we pay 20% more 
for your books than is currently available at 
other dealers Second, these exceptionally high 
prices attract a lot of books- literally tons of 
them, so our stocks are the largest in Manhattan, 
bar none! (One out of every three course books 
sold at the Union this year was a used book ) 
With such a high volume of used copies 

k-state union 




bookstore 



available, and since you save twice on uaed 
books < once when you but it. and again when you 
sell it) it is easy to see why the net result is such 
a huge savings. It's a fact that the Union puts 
more cash in the hands of K-SUte students than 
anybody else in the book business. You couldn t 
save more if you bought all new books at 

wholesale! 

So why are we buying this ad? Not just to 
blow our own horn. We figure that if you know 
the facts, you can save yourself a lot of money. 
So we bought this ad to convince you that there 
are only two simple steps to save money on your 
textbooks: 

1. Sell your books at the Union-you save 

because we pay more. 

2. Buy your books at the Union— you save 
because we have more used books. 

So, gather up all those books lying around 
the apartment or dorm room, and sell them at 
the Union (in front of Forum Hall) From Dec. 11 
Thru Dec. 22 Then, come see us again 
during registration. Remember, we save you 
more, and we can prove it. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thura.,P»ctmbw7,1978 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurt., December 7, 1t7a 



AAM tractorcade 

to rumble east 
in parity demand 

By RICH CURRY 

Collegian Reporter 

Kansas and Colorado farmers will drive 
their tractors past the capitol steps in 
Topeka Dec, 15 during a tractorcade held by 
members of the American Agriculture 
Movement (AAM). 

According to Carol Ebert of the Wamego 
AAM office, for many area farmers this 
drive will be the first step in a cross-country 
trip ending at the nation's capitol sometime 
in January. 

During their trek across Kansas, which 
for some will begin at Lamar, Colo., the 
farmers' will pass through the Manhattan 
area Dec. 15, Ebert said. 

The AAM started Dec. 14, 1977 in 
Springfield, Colorado The group called for a 
nationwide strike if their demands for 100 
percent parity (receiving a minimum price 
to cover production costs) were not met. 

Only 10 days after the first strike office 
opened in Colorado, AAM was able to 
muster 10,000 farmers to meet with 
Secretary of Agriculture Bob Bergland in 
Pueblo, Colo. 

Since that time, thousands of rallies and 
tractorcades have been held nationwide. 
Farmers have decended on Washington, 
D.C. several times and have shut down 
border crossings to demonstrate against 
imported vegetables and beef. 

THE AAM is a non-profit, volunteer 
organization. There are no dues and all 
donations help pay for a national 
newspaper, state newsletters, publicity 
campaigns and radio and television com- 
mercials. 

According to Ebert, this year's trac- 
torcade was called to try to achieve parity 
for farmers, draw attention to the growth of 
corporate farms, protest unfair government 
regulations and increase awareness of 
foreign control of major U.S. grain 
marketing companies. 

"If farmers received full parity price for 
their goods, prices would only go up about 3 
percent, much less than if food production 
falls into corporate hands. Many people 
don't realize this but there's a farmer going 
under every 56 seconds. If multinational and 
banking interests get control over food, then 
they've got control over everything," Ebert 

said. 

According to American Agriculture News, 
the national AAM paper, people should know 
imported produce and beef does not have to 
meet the same standards and inspection as 
U.S. products. The paper cited the use of 
pesticides by Mexico which are banned in 
the U.S., and the lower— or sometimes 
absent-standards of meat inspection that 
allow imported goods to be produced less 
expensively than it costs American farmers. 

Ebert talked about foreign control of U.S. 
grain marketing companies. 

"There are four major grain marketing 
companies in the U.S. today that are 
foreign-controlled. It is our contention that 
these companies are manipulating prices. 
One of the purposes of our convention in 
Topeka is to try to get subpoena power to 
investigate these firms, " she said. 

IN RESPONSE to this problem, Ebert 
said the Kansas State Legislature invited 13 
other states to a Grain Marketing Compact 
at Topeka Dec. 18. She said the compact will 
investigate the problem and see about 
putting floor prices on grain. 

"On the morning the compact begins, 
AAM farmers will be there on the steps of 
the capitol to show their support," she said. 

ATTENTION 

VETERANS and 
DEPENDENTS 

STOP BY THE 

OFFICE OF VETERANS' 

AFFAIRS TO COMPLETE 

YOUR SPRING 

ENROLLMENT 

INFORMATION FORM 




Buy-Back 



Here 
are some 

answers to 
often asked questions. 




Question: 
Answer: 



How dots the Union Bookstore determine how much your 
books are worth when you sell them back? 

If the Bookstore has notification from the instructor that the 
books are to be re-adopted for use the next semester, and if the 
Bookstore does not already have a sufficient stock on hand, then 
you will be offered 60 per cent of the publisher's current list price. 

For example: if a book sells for $10.00 new and it meets the 
requirements noted above, the book would be bought from you for 

$6.00. 

If the Bookstore has not received notice that the book will be 
used again, or if it already has a sufficient stock on hand, the book 
would be worth the current wholesale price as indicated by one of 
the nation's largest jobbers of used textbooks. 

If you have any questions about the price being paid for a text- 
book, the buyer will be happy to answer any questions which you 
may have regarding the price paid. 



Question: 
Answer: 



Is 60 per cent the usual price paid 
for textbooks around the country? 

Definitely not. Most stores in the United States pay only 50 per 
cent for books being used again. The Union Bookstore is one of the 
few stores which pays 60 per cent. And remember, we pay cash. You 
don't have to take your money out in trade. 



Question 
Answer 



What about paperbacks? Does the 
60 per cent policy apply to them too? 



Yes. The Union Bookstore does not penalize you on paper- 
backs. If they are being used again, and it Ihe bookstore needs 
them, you will receive 60 per cent of the publisher's list price. 



Question: 



If the publisher's price has gone up since I bought my books, 
will I receive the benefit of that price increase? 



gk ^_ gBWKmmm Yes ' For instance, if you bought your book for $9.00 and the 

JHiIImVVvX • publishers list price is now $10.00, you will get $6.00, not $5.40 



We will buy books: 




Monday, Dec. 11 

thru 

Friday, Dec. 15 
Saturday, Dec. 16 



Monday, Dec. 18 

thru 

Friday, Dec. 22 

k-state union 

bookstore 



8:15 a.m. 
to 

4:45 p.m. 
10:00 a.m. 

to 
4:00 p.m. 

8:15 a.m. 
to 

4:45 p.m. 



0301 



w 



10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thuni., DacwrHw 7, 1978 




Staff pftolo by Scotl Lirtter 



TENSE SITUATION.. .Amos, played by Rod Russell, sophomore tn 
journalism and mass communications, and Marta, played by Teresa 
Frost, graduate in speech, rehearse a scene from "From Heaven to 
Hell." * 

'From Heaven to Hell' 
focuses on characters 



By DEBBIE NEFF 

Collegian Reporter 

Images and messages transmitted from 
stage to audience are Cindy Helferstay's 
business. She is a playwright. 

Helferstay's 19th play, "From Heaven to 
Hell," opens at 8:00 tonight in the Purple 
Masque Theatre in East Stadium. 

"From Heaven to Hell" is the story of the 
conflict between two brothers raised in the 
backwoods of Missouri. 

"I got the idea about five years ago," 
Helferstay, a former K-State student, said. 
"One of the characters is based on true 
stories about a gentleman who lived alone in 
the woods of Missouri in the '30s." 

Helferstay said the play, originally one 
act, has been rewritten six times. 

"I intend to continue writing (and 
rewriting) plays as long as my hand can 
hold a pen," she said. "I've always got ideas 



for something to write. When I write, I draw 
on any event in my life, no matter how tiny 
or insignificant it might have seemed at the 
time. 

"I like to take these seemingly in- 
significant happenings and piece them 
together like a jigsaw puzzle. All of the 
pieces are at my fingertips and how they are 
fit together determines the outcome. " 

Helferstay said "From Heaven to Hell" 
concentrates more on characterization than 
theme. 

The story's brothers, Amos and Will, have 
difficulty expressing their emotions, despite 
having a genuine affection for one another. 

The two women in the play, Marta and 
Elsie, work for "The Salvation of Man," a 
local charity organization. Like the men, 
they too have problems conveying emotions. 

The four actors, Rod Russell, Mark 
(See FORMER, p. U> 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurs., December 7. 1978 



11 



Happy Anniversary, Jim! 



i 




ABOVE. ..Flanked by then athletic director John "Jersey" Jermier 
(left), Jim Dickey became K State's head football coach a year ago 
today. TOP RIGHT... As the season progressed, Dickey discussed 
strategy with offensive coordinator Carl Selmer. RIGHT.. .And, with 
back-to-back victories against Colorado and KU, Dickey finally had 
something to cheer about. 



Jim Dickey first came to K-Stateone year 
ago as just another in a seemingly endless 
succession of head football coaches. But his 
accomplishments during that span speak 
loudly for Dickey's stature as a man and as 
a coach. 

Vowing to restore fun to Wildcat football, 
Dickey assumed the reins of a perennial 
loser. His optimism and humor attracted 
many non-believers to him, sweeping them 
up in his faith in himself, his coaches and his 
players. 

When former Athletic Director John 
"Jersey" Jermier first introduced Dickey, a 
former assistant at the University of North 
Carolina, to K -St ate on Dec. 7, 1977, he was 
greeted with limited enthusiasm. 

Today, Dickey is one of the magic names 
to K-State students, faculty and staff. He 
said it wasn't going to be easy, but K State 
could win. And he was right. 

THE WILDCATS began the season in 
typical K -State fashion, losing to Arizona, 
33-0. But Dickey didn't throw in the towel. 
And he refused to let his players give up. 

The Wildcats captured their first win of 
the season against Air Force and followed it 
with a triumph over Big 8- rival Oklahoma 
State. 

But K-State fared poorly agianst its next 
four opponents: Nebraska, Oklahoma, 
Missouri and Iowa State. 

Dickey again rallied his troops for a 20-10 
upset over slumping Colorado. 

However, his toughest test was yet to 
come, against arch-rival Kansas. A win 
would be a boost to recruiting, ticket sales, 
enthusiasm and school pride. 

AT A PEP RALLY Thursday night before 
the Kansas contest, Dickey promised "to 
make you all proud of us." 

And he did. The Wildcats drove down the 
field on their opening possession to take a 
lead they never relinquished. 

The sellout crowd of 45,000 plus got more 
than its money's worth as K-State 
thoroughly dominated the game until a 
fourth-quarter outburst by KU. 

Dickey is man of his word and he kept his 
word that day. He has the K-State football 
program back on the right path. 

And he has done it without sacrificing the 
principles which he believes in. For that K- 
State says "Thank You and Happy 
Anniversary." 







' 



t? KANSAS STATE COLLEQIAN, Ttw»„ D»c»mbT 7, 1978 

Former K-State star 
Mitchell dies in Italy 



By KAREN CARLSON 
Collegian Reporter 

Friends and former coach Jack Hartman 
were shocked and surprised at the death of 
former basketball star Steve Mitchell. 

Mitchell played for K-State 1970-1973 and 
was playing for a European team at the time 
of his death. 

Jim Thomas, teammate of Mitchell said 
Mitchell and a "half-dozen other Americans 
had dinner at his house Monday night and 
everyone appeared to be in excellent con- 
dition. Mitchell had had some beer and wine 
and suddenly became dizzy and felt acute 
stomach pains." 

Mitchell asked if he could spend the night 
and was asleep as the other Americans left, 
police said. 

Tuesday morning Thomas and his wife 
left to do some shopping. When they 
returned they tried to wake Mitchell, but he 
remained motionless. A doctor was then 
summoned, police said. 

Police quoted the doctor as saying the 
cause of death might be from stomach 
congestion. 

MITCHELL'S BODY showed no visible 
signs of any foul play or anything unusual, 
police said. 

Ernie Kusnyer, former K-State teammate 
of Mitchell's, said he was "shocked and 
deeply hurt by the news." 

"He was my best friend. We were 
recruited together, and played basketball 
all through college," Kusnyer said. "He was 
loved by everybody on the team." 

Kusnyer said he talked to Mitchell's 
mother, and she told him an autopsy would 
be done. 

Mitchell's mother told Kusnyer that 
Mitchell had asthma and broke out in a rash 
the night he died. 

"He (Mitchell) was happy with what he 
was doing," Kusnyer said: Holding back 
tears, he added, "For 27 years he got a lot in, 
more than most people do in a lifetime." 

When Mitchell played for K-State, he 
racked up a total of 1,079 points and is 
seventh in K-State's top 20 all-time scorers. 
In his senior year, K-State beat KU three 
times in a row, twice in the regular season 
and once at the preseason tournament. 

MITCHELL also ranked second in the 
highest field goal percentage with an 
average of S2.3, and fifth in the most 
rebounds throughout his career at K-State. 

Happy birthday, Judy: 
Wbmen down K-State 

The K-State women's basketball team 
gave Coach Judy Akers a fitting birthday 
present last night by beating Iowa State 89- 
64 in Ames, Iowa. 

"I thought we played outstanding ball," 
Akers said. "We were able to intimidate 
them." 

Leann Wilcox led the Wildcats' effort with 
14 points. Eileen Feeney shot 100 percent in 
the game, six-for-six from the field and one- 
for-one from the line. 

Tami Johnson and Laurie Miller each 
scored 12 points for the 'Cats. 

K-State shot 55,7 percent from the field, 
topping Iowa State's 47.5 percent. The 
Wildcats also outshot the Cyclones from the 
free throw line, 78.5 percent to 66.6 percent. 

The rebound battle also went to K-State, 38 
to 31. 

The Wildcats jumped to a 49-35 halftime 
lead, and Akers said "the kids were ready to 
play . It was a fun game." 




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After playing basketball at K-State, 
Mitchell went to the camp of the Phoenix 
Suns, where he was offered a chance to play 
for Italy's Sarila Rimmini Club, Kusnyer 
said. 

"He was making good money and was 
happy playing basketball there," Kusnyer 
said. "The team he played with was the best 
team in the European league." 

Jack Hartman, who coached Mitchell 
while he played for K-State, said, "He was a 
likable person and very popular with his 
teammates." 




Steve Mitchell 

"He played center for the team and was 
on two conference championship teams," 
Hartman said. 

Hartman said Mitchell was a "happy-go- 
lucky guy" and his teammates liked him 
well. 

Lon Kruger, assistant basketball coach 
for K-State, said, "The news came as a 
surprise. Everyone liked him and he was 
easy to get along with." 

Kruger played with Mitchell on the 
basketball team for two years. 



Strictly Hetero— 

Get psyched to play and 
go all the way! 

Your V Bers 

Trad, Nancy, Jane, 
Kafhy, Laurie 



■u 



i 



REMINDER 

HOLY DAY -DEC 8 

Masses at St. Isidore's 

Thursday Evening 5:00 p.m. & 8:30 p.m. 
Friday 12:10, 4:00 & 5:30 p.m. 

ALSO- Mass at Danforth Chapel 
11:30 a.m. Friday 



SWEATERS 

SHIRTS— TIES-CORDS 

PANTS— LEATHERS— TWEEDS 

M 'OK T t OVTS— SI ITS-CO \TS-( OM H3N KS 



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Bugging, break-ins and 
Watergate-style shenanigans 
are the objects of timely satire in 
this hilarious farce A young 
violinist unknowingly becomes 
the decoy in a cut-throat battle 
between political spies. They 
turn his life into total mayhem; 
but through it all the tall blond 
man remains a naive and 
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Keaton, narrowly escaping peril 
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BLOND MAN 
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"The kind of story that might 
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ABC-TV 

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It's so crammed with funny 
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Los Angeles Times 






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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thun., December 7, 1978 



13 



Low in prestige but high in talent 



By TRAC1E D1TTEMORE 
Collegian Reporter 

Walk on— work out— and hope. 

That's the story of the average men's 
junior varsity basketball player at K-State. 
They practice every day just like the var- 
sity, using the court adjacent to the varsity. 




James Bailey 

Then later, they work against the varsity on 
specific skills or in scrimmages. 

Four junior varsity players— Kevin 
Gardenhire, John Chmiel, Reggie Gabon 
and James Bailey— suit up for varsity 
games. Eugene Goodlow, who has just come 
out for basketball after playing football, also 
suited up for the varsity last year. 

Goodlow, a 6-1 sophomore from Rochester 
N.Y., led the JV in scoring last year with 
17.5 points per game. 

Chrniel, a 6-7 freshman forward from 
Schaumberg, 111., is the only scholarship 
player on the squad. 

"John is a very good shooter," JV Coach 
Darryl Winston said. "He's a quick forward 
who plans on seeing varsity action with a 
little more experience." 

f COACH Jack Hartman is also impressed 
Jilh Chmiel. 
"Just give John a little experience and he 




John Chmiel 

will start making his share of contributions 
to our basketball program," Hartman said. 

Gardenhire, a 6-0 sophomore guard from 
Salina, played junior varsity last year. 

"Kevin has really improved from last 
year,'' Winston said. "He's starting for us 
and has shown great potential. ' ' 

Gardenhire is the team's third-leading 
scorer. He had 12 points Tuesday night 
against Dodge City Community College. 

Clabon, a 6-2 freshman from St. Louis, is 
the younger brother of former University of 
Missouri standout, James Clabon. 

"Reggie is a strong and poised guard," 
Winston said. Clabon gained all-American 
honorable mention honors while at Central 
High School in St. Louis. 



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Brothers' 



BAILEY, a 6-7 sophomore, leads the JV in 
scoring and rebounding. He played high 
school ball at Washington High School in 
Los Angeles, spent a year at Kansas City 
Community College, then transferred to K- 
State. He sat out last year as a redshirt. 

Bailey had 28 points and 21 rebounds 
against Emporia State's JV earlier this year 
and 18 points against Dodge City Juco. 

The other guards for the squad are Henry 
Pullian, Eric Thompson and Kent Walker. 

Pullian is a transfer from Highland 
Community College, 

"Henry is an aggressive point-guard with 
good quickness and a great desire for the 
game," Winston said. 

Thompson, a sophomore from Topeka, 
played last year. 

"Eric displays great defensive talents and 
is a heady ballplayer," Winston said. 

WALKER, a good-shooting, 6-3 freshman 
from Rolling Meadows, 111., has been slowed 
by injuries. An injury also prematurely 
ended Walker's high school career, although 



he did score 30, 32 and 36 points in his first 
three games as a senior before being 
knocked out by a bad ankle. 

Ben Moore, Woody Soldner and Bret 
Heath are the other squad members. 

Moore, 6-5, is a sophomore guard-forward 
from Junction City. 

Soldner, brother of starting varsity center 



Steve Soldner, is a 6-6 freshman center from 
Farina, 111., who has been slowed by a pre* 
season knee injury. 

Heath is a 6-4 freshman who played at 
Shawnee Mission South. 

The junior varsity, 2-1 on the season, will 
play Butler County Juco prior to the varsity 
game Saturday against Cal-Poly Pomona. 




N NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS NUTS N 



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Eugene Goodlow 

Mai lory interested, 
but O-State's not 

STILLWATER, Okla. (AP)-Oklahoma 
State's committee to find a new football 
coach will meet again Friday, but one ap- 
plicant already has been told he needn't wait 
for a call. 

"I was very interested, but Dr. Young 
(Athletic Director Richard Young) told me 
outright that he wanted to go outside the 
(Big 8) conference," said Bill Mallory, the 
fired Colorado coach. "He told me that OSU 
had no interest in me." 



MiVIH 



PRE-VET MEETING 

LAST MEETING OF THE SEMESTER 

WHEN: Dec. 7, 1978, 7:00 p.m. 

Where: Auditorium at New Vet Clinical Building 

What: CLUB OFFICER ELECTIONS 
Speaker: Gary Clarke, Director of Topeka Zoo 




FORUM HALL 



FRIDAY-SATURDAY 



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Roger Ebert Chicago Son-Times 

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14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thur».. December 7, 1978 



Former K-Stater's play 'Heaven to Hell' to premiere tonight 



» 



(continued from p. 10 > 
Pennington, Patty Wirtz and Teresa Frost 
have been moonlighting for the past 17 days 
preparing for their performances. 

Director Alana Windhorst, graduate in 
speech, said three of the actors (Russell, 
Pennington and Wirtz) also were in the 
Department of Speech's presentation of 
"Carousel," so rehearsals for "Heaven to 
Hell" didn't begin until after Nov. 18. 

WINDHORST said this delay has com- 
plicated her job and the actors' jobs as well. 
Russell , sophomore in journalism and mass 
communication, plays Amos, the gentleman 
in Helferstay's memory on whom the story 
is based. 



Amos lives a quiet life, alone in the back- 
woods of Missouri on land left to him when 
his father died. The fact that Amos inherited 
the farm and a considerable amount of 
money complicates the relationship bet- 
ween he and his brother, Will. 

"Amos cares for his brother, but he 
doesn't know how to show he cares. It's 
something that you feel but you can't say," 
Russell said. 

He said the last three weeks have been 
very trying. 

"It's really scary," he said. "Because of 
the rewrite I didn't find out what the third 
act was like until last week, and the worst 
part was I didn't get to go home for 
Thanksgiving dinner." 



Charlie can walk a mile now 



Charlie the camel is up and hobbling at his 
new home— Manhattan's Sunset Zoo. 

The eighteen-month-old male dromedary 
was donated to the zoo by his owner, Hugo 
Shea, of Wichita, according to Tom Demry, 
zoo director. 

Charlie has spent the past three months in 
the large animal section of K-State's 
veterinary hospital under the medical 
supervision of Dr. Jerome Vestweber, 
associate professor of surgery and 
medicine. 

The camel was suffering from "a 
metabolic bone disease, believed to have 
been caused by diet deficiencies," Vest- 



weber said. This condition had destroyed the 
muscle tone in his front legs and forced 
Charlie to stay down most of his time, he 
said. 

The condition has improved enough for 
Charlie to be taken off medication and take 
regular exercise in order to continue his 
recovery, Vestweber said. 

Charlie will be used in the children's zoo 
for the season, Demry said. 

"He's a good-natured came), and he's in 
good enough shape to be used as a breeder 
and a zoo animal," Demry said. 

Demry said Charlie will be well cared for 
at the zoo. 



Will, portrayed by Pennington, junior in 
speech, is the antithesis of his brother Amos. 
He seeks alternatives to farm living through 
women, gambling and whiskey. In his 
searching, he turns to his girlfriend, Elsie. 

"He is searching for someone to need 
him," Pennington said. "I don't think he 
knows what real love is. He thinks love is 
someone who talks to him, has time for him 
and does things with him. So, in that sense, 
he loves her." 

Because of Carousel, Pennington said his 
character has had to develop rapidly. 

"Jigger (Pennington's role in 
"Carousel") was so embedded in my mind 
at that time that I didn't have time to think 
about Will," he said. 

WILL'S GIRLFRIEND, Elsie, is por- 
trayed by Wirtz, sophomore in speech. 

Wirtz views Elsie's needs as similar to the 
needs of the other characters. 

"Everybody needs somebody," she said. 
"No matter how much they think they want 
to isolate themselves. We (the characters) 
have all run away from other people and we 
all come eventually to the realization that 
we can't live alone." 

Wirtz said going directly from "Carousel" 
to "From Heaven to Hell" limited her time, 
but caused no problems changing charac- 
ters. 

The final character, Marta, director of 
The Salvation of Man, is played by Frost, 
graduate in speech. 

Marta feels it's her duty to save the people 
of her community from the evils of sin, and 
educate them about the modern world. 



doWnatOWn by Tim Downs 

' HELOOKSUKE. 1 



' ANDHERES 
CHESTER AT 
THREE MONTHS. 




HELOOKSUKE 

WINSTON CHURCHILL 



' DOESNTHEUOOK 1 
LIKE SOMEONE ELSE, 
THOUGH? 





PEANUTS 



by Charles Shultz 



I HATE TO SHOW ANf 
INTEREST, BUT IN HOUR 
BOOK, DOES BEETHOVEN 

MEET NAH OTHER WOMEN? 




OH, VES! IN CHAPTER 
FOUR HIS LANPLAWSAtS 
ID HIM," IF 40UPONT 
PA* YOUR RENI HOD 
KNOW UWAT I'LL DO?" 




['YUKICK 
HOW 

J>lANO!" 

7 n 




I KNEW I 5H0ULPNT 
HAVE SHOWN AW 

INTEREST... 




Crossword By Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 
1 Actor 

Guinness 
S Patrolman, 

to some 
8 Paradise 

12 Sei symbol 
Turner 

13 Fuss 

14 Defense org. 

15 Turkish 
official 

16 — diem 

17 Sketch 

18 Unruffled 
20 Awl, for 

example 
22 Extensively 
26 Unfortunate 

individual 

29 Tacit 
assent 

30 Partner to 
neither 

31 Elec. 
measures 

32 Pig's 
dwelling 

33 Ham's 
companion 

34 Ancient 
French coin 

35 Three, to 
Tacitus 



36 Inflow 

37 Ambivalent 

40 Elm or oak 

41 Dover's 
attraction 

45 Space 
47 Actor's 
signal 

49 — con- 
tendere 

50 Street 
feature 

51 "Not - 
Stranger" 

52 Developed 

53 Hardy girl 

54 Sought 
office 

55 Observed 



DOWN 

lPub 
requests 

2 Rich 
fabric 

3 Actress 
Ragnold 

4 Wine bottles 

5 Stunt 

6 Pindaric 
opus 

7 Roth persona 
of note 

8 Provide 
with talent 

9 Beloved 
ones 

10 Greek vowel 

11 The present 



Average solution time: 23 min. 







Answer to yesterday's puzzle. 



19 Seaman 
21 Peculiar 

23 Clownish 
action 

24 Palace 
owner, in 
Venice 

25 Once, once 

26 Eye 
protector 

27 Melville 
novel 

28 Speaks 
confusedly 

32 Motorcycle 
adjunct 

33 Happy 
items, 
often 

35 Chemical 
suffix 

36 Under the 
weather 

38 Bedouins 

39 Atlantic, 
for one 

42 Golf cry 

43 Run away 

44 Planted 

45 Play a role 

46 Poe's " - 
Morgue" 

48 Neighbor 
of Can. 




CRYPTOQUIP 12-7 

HWUUZ WAIXKTNUWFZ WH ECYKWCE 
NF IXKTNU ENAYCH 

* 

Yesterday's Cryptoquip — IMPUDENT DUNCE DISRUPTS 
ALL CLASSROOM ROUTINE. 

Today's Cryptoquip clue : Y equals C 



Initially, she visits Amos in hopes of 
teaching him "cleanliness is next to 
Godliness." Amos, however, is not very 
hospitable and makes it clear he enjoys 
living the way he does. 

"Marta is secretly attracted to him but 
she doesn't want to admit it to herself," 
Frost said. "She's intrigued by the fact that 
he's always telling her to go a way . ' ' 



Collegian 
Classifieds 



CLASSIFIED RATES 
Ont day: 20 words or lest, $1.60, 5 cenla 
per word over 20; Two days: 20 words or leas, 
$2.00, a cants par word over 20; Three days: 
20 words or less, $2,25, 10 cents per word 
over 20; Four days: 20 words or less, $2.75, 13 
cents per word over 20; Flvs days: 20 words or 
less, $3.00, 1 5 cents per word over 20. 

Display Classified Rate* 
On* day: (2 75 per Inch; Three days: 12.60 par inch; Fly a 
days: *2 50 per inch; Tan days: 12.40 par Inch. (Deadline Is 5 
p m J days before publication.) 

Classified advertising is available only to those who do not 
discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national 
origin, sax orancaatry. 

FOR SALE 

MANHATTAN USED Furniture, 
browse 776-61 12 (3 75) 



317 S. 4lh. Coma In and 



WE SELL MaranU and Phillips. Tech E lac Iron Ic Warehouse, 
•cross from Vista Drive Inn on Turtle Creek Blvd. (23tt| 

MOSSMAN GUITARS— due 10 factory shut down I have for • 
Short time some very nice acoustic steel string guitars at 
lass than hall original price. Call after 5:00 p.m. 318-221 ■ 
2825 or 221 3988, Wlnlleld, KS. (52-71) 

COINS MAKE excellent gilts. Complete selection U.S. and 
Foreign. Blrthyaar and anniversary sets available. Treasure 
Chest, Old Town Mall-Aagievllle (65-76) 

CHESS SETS, hand carved, wooden and onyx. Also Chess 
tables sod backgammon sets. Ideal Christmas gills. 
Treasure Chest. Agglevllle 165-76) 

ANTIQUE JEWELRY and watches, nice selection of the 
classic old styles for Christmas. Old Town Mall and 
Aggfevltle. (85-74) 

OAK ROCKER. oak swivel desk chair, oak library tab**, hall 
tree, oak dresser, pie cupboard and chest. 776-9705 alter 
5:00 p.m. (67-71) 

MUST SELL 1972 mobile home 12x70, with patio and shed. 
Call 539-1639 atter 5 00 p.m. or anytime on weekends. 187- 
71) 

1977 BELLA Vista trailer house, two bedroom, furnished, 
skirled, shed. Jusi like new and In excellent location, 537- . 
9503. (67-71) 



Pecans 

FOR SALE DEC. 7&8 

At Upper Research 

Greenhouse directly 

north of Dickens Hall 

from 7:30 a.m. to 

5:30 p.m. 

By Horticulture 
Club 

All pre-cracked-in 
multiples of 5 lb. bags 

only$1.30/lb. 



MOBILE HOME, 12x60. Iwo bedroom, lot) of living space, 
built-in dressers, skirted and tied down Nice lot 537-7198, 
(87-71) 

USED KINO size water bed; complete kit Included 776-0338 
I68.7I) 

1974 HONDA Civic. 68.000 miles. New paint, rebuilt engine. 
American racing wheels. T.A, radlsls 537-2050. (68-70) 

1974 GREMLIN, black, full power, V-8 engine New tires. Call 
537-2050. (88-70) 



NEW 14 WIDE HOMES 
AS LOW AS $8,850! 

Payments Less Than Rent 

Used Homes For Sale 
Homes For Rent 

WOODY'S MOBILE 
HOME SALES 

2044 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 

Manhattan, Kansas 66502 

913-539-5621 

Approved FHA-VA Financing 



CHANNEL MASTER AM/FM, FMM PX, 8 track record and 4 
speakers. }45. Call 7764794. (70 71) 

SNOW SKISf Oynaster model 530, red and white, 200 cm, 
Gate toe-heel bindings, straps, good condition, 1 75 Tom, 
5374764. (70-72) 

(Continued on page 1 5) 



1 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurt., D»c«mb«r7, 1978 



IB 



(ConlinutxJ from page 14) 

HEATH H-8 microcomputer with 4K memory. Complete with 
so It ware and documentation WIN build complete system 
ala reasonable coal. 53*5956 (68-72) 

14 k 70 WINDSOR, two bedroom encellunl condition. Good 
Investment, low monthly payment*, fenced yard. Memo, 
DW, GO. cenlrel air. large shed Located near Tuttle Creek. 
Available Jan. 1st 537-9132 (88-71) 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS TI-57 programmable calculator, J4S 
Tl 25 scientific calculator, 125. Tl 59 software: Slalistlcs. 
electronic engineering, securities and printer utility. 539- 
5956 (68-721 

SONY NR 115 professional Dolby noise reduction adapter 
One year warranty. Calibration tapes are Included for 
caassette and reel-to-reel recorders. 539-5958. (68-72) 

ONE MINI-GYM quadricep and hamstring lag machine. Ex- 
cellent Christmas present lor an athlete 776-1054. (68-71) 

WHITE CHEST of drawers wth matching desk, full size mat- 
tress and box springs, Iron rod aquarium aland. All In good 
condition Price negotiable. 776 5622 (69-731 

197S CHEW Monu 2 plus 2. V-8. Automatic, power steering, 
air condition I ng. one owner. 539-0345 afternoon and 
evenings. (89-73) 

METALLIC SLUE 4-door Chevy Mallbu. 57.000 miles, radio, 
air, 8 track, V8, fantastic condition, 1965. negotiants Call 
776-0914 today. (89-73) 

1984 KARMANN Ghla Coupe, rebuilt engine, excellent con- 
dition. 537-2647 (69-71) 

CANON MF motor drive lor F-1 Three months old wilh new 
warranty 532-8555, ask for Craig Chandler. (89-73) 

PLYMOUTH CAR. four door. Good condition. Rebuilt engine. 
1350 10,000 BTU air conditioner, used only one summer 
180 Bargain 776-3759 (70-71) 



"ROCK N ROLL" 
GOODIES! 

Guitars, Amps & P.A.'s demon- 
strated in a Large club size area. 

( NOW FULLY CARPETED) 
Come in and SEE! 
Gibson L6S-Custom w/case 
was 688.00 now $349.00 

Gibson EB series Bass gtr. 
was 329.00 now $199.00 

Fender Stratocaster Nat. (New) 

•Special* 
Ibanez Les Paul Cust. Copy 

(collectable) 
was 349.00 now $239.00 

Gibson J-45Dlxe Acoustic (new) 
was 519.00 now $379.00 

at 

MUSIC VILLAGE 

417Humboldt Downtown Thurs. till8:30 



AM/FM STEREO receiver wilh built-in 6 track and speakers 
BSR 4600 turntable Call 539-9701 and ask lor Todd O'Nell 
(70-71) 

USED HOOVER washer. Best oiler, call 778-3510. (70-72) 

AKC REGISTERED Dachaftund puppies ready In time for 
Christmas. Call 776-9807, evenings. (70-74) 



FOR RENT 



TYPEWRITER RENTALS, eleclrics and manuals; day, week 
or month Buzzells. 511 Leavenworth, across from post ol 
lice. Call 776-9469. (Itf) 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS: Excellent selection. Hull Business 
Machines, 1212 Moro, 539-7931. Service most makes Of 
typewriters Also Victor and Olivetti adders (18tf) 

SANTA SUITS. Reserve yours now. Treasure Chesl, 
Agglevllle. (43-78) 

LARGE TWO bedroom apartment with two sleeping lofts, 
1270, bills paid, at 1016Osege 537-4233. (57-71) 

LARGE ONE bedroom lumiahed apartment at 221 N, Juliette. 
Water, trash, and heal paid. 1 160 per month. 776-3866 or 1- 
456*614,(84-76) 

PLUSH. TWO bedroom furnished apartment, carpeted, cen- 
tral air. laundry dishwasher balcony, near campus, 
Agglevllle. January 1260 7764600 after 5:00 p m. (66-70) 

NOW AVAILABLE newly carpeted two bedroom house. Call 
532 3 1 21 Of 537-1289. Ask lor Terry (66-70) 

TWO BEDROOM basement apartment, furnished. 
Wastte r/d ryer hookup.S160plusKPL.an822Hunllng.one 
half block from KSU 5398401 (68801 

NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 

from $165 

• FREjU. shuttle service to 
KSU 

• portion of utilities paid 

• adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

PHONE 

539-2951 

or see at 

1413 Cambridge Place 



NICE ONE bedroom apartment, good location $100, 539- 
7124,6398985 (69-73) 

ONE BEDROOM apartment, one block west of campus. 
Available January 1st. $130 a month. 776-1088 or 537-2522. 
(69-76) 

LARGE NICELY furnished one bedroom beseroenl apart 
ment 800 block Valuer SI Couple or (wo singles. Under 
$ 150 plus eleclfldly No pets 776-8055(69-76) 

LARGE FURNISHED two bedroom, one and one hall belh. 
balcony laundry (acuities, water and trash paid. Moro, 
available January 1st 776-7746. (70-78) 



LARGE FURNISHED apartment at 1016 Osage, bedrooms 
and sleeping lofts, good for 3-4 people $250, bills paid 
837-4233. (88-95) 

FURNISHED BEDROOMS, kitchen and laundry facilities, 
free perking and walk to KSU. $55 and up, bills paid 537 
4233. (68-95) 

THROUGH MAY, I urn is bed two bedroom apart men l. Dish- 
washer, air conditioned. Available January 1. Close lo cam- 
pus Call 537 7268 after 5:30 p.m. (67-71) 

HUGE ROOM lo rent. fSSfmonth, alt utilities paid, k lichen, 
laundry (acuities Five minute walk lo campus. Call 532 
6850 (9-5). Leave message lor Rich Ettenson. will return 
call. (88-71) 

LARGE, FURNISHED, two bedroom apartment One and one 
half blocks from campus, ground floor, clean. No lease, no 
pels. $1 50 plus electricity 539-4275.(68-72) 

MUST SEE this large one bedroom furnished duplex. 
Redecorated, country setting, close to town $185 No 
pels. 776-6846 (66-72) 

ONE BEDROOM furnished apartment U till ties paid, deposit 
required, no pets 537-9734 or 776-5763 (68-71) 

NEAR CAMPUS. 2 or 3 males, private rooms, nice brick 
home 537-4283 or 539-2683 (68-76) 

ONE BEDROOM, near campus, spacious, olfstreel parking, 
heal paid, available Jan. 1st. $180. 1131 Valtter 776-9896 
evenings. (68-70) 

EFFICIENCY APARTMENT, near Campus, heal paid, 
aval la I be Jan l, $135. a u let person preferred, 1131 Valtler. 
776-9896 evenings (88 70) 



WILDCAT INN 

2nd Semester 

Seniors Graduating 

Make Limited Availability 

For 2nd Semester 

Occupancy 

Call 

CELESTE 
for Information 

539-5001 



LARGE THREE bedroom house, 1104 Bluemont. Available 
January 1st. One and one hall bathrooms, traah, water 
paid. 7764)300 or 53*8*01 (70-73) 

FOUR BEDROOM house, one block from campus. Fireplace, 
large living area. Available Dec. 1 5 Phone 537-4848. (70 74) 

IDEAL FURNISHED two bedroom apartment, water, trash 
and healing paid Close to campus. Available at end of 
semester $210 Call 539-3 1 78. (70-72) 



Villa Apartments 
526 N. 14th 

Available January 
2 Blocks from campus 

ONE-BEDROOM 

FURNISHED 

$200 A MONTH 

—No pets or children- 
Call 
537-9567 or 539-1201 



ONE BEDROOM and large two bedroom apartments near 
campus. Available January 1st. 537-2344. (70-76) 

BARGAIN TWO bedroom apartment at Wildcat Creek tor 
$210 a month Sublease will run from January 1 lo May 30. 
Willing lo negollale over terms Call 778-9588 between BOO 
p.m and midnight for more Information. (70-74) 

TRAILER, CLOSE 10 campus, clean, must be student 
Available now to end ol next semester. 778-5892 (70-72) 



SUBLEASE 



SECOND SEMESTER. Large, partly furnished I wo bedroom 
house, one hall block from campus and Agglevllle. 
Available Jan. 1st. $189, Rick or Wade. 7784108. (88-71) 

$90 TWO room apartment lor only $75 month. One half block 
from campus All utilities Included, now to May 31 , 1979. 
Cell Oanlet. 532-5654, 537-0144. (70-72) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 



FEMALES TO share exceptional house al KSU. rum I shad, 
private bedrooms, $86 and up. washer and dryer, no pels, 
al809N 11th 539-8401 (97-86) 

MALE TO share large house one block Irom KSU. Private 
bedroom, furnished. $70 at 1108 Bluemont 539-8401. (66- 
95) 

LIBERAL MALE or female roommate lor second semester. 
Two bedroom apartment one block from campus. $80 mon- 
th. 776-7388 sfler 4:00 p.m. (86-70) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester, low bills. $100 month, private 
bedroom. 776-7368 alter 4:00 p.m. (66-70) 

FEMALE WANTED lo share luxurious large new two 

bedroom trailer house, convenient location. $60 plus one 
third utilities. 776-7810(88-70) 

MALE TO share nice basement apartment two blocks Irom 
Aggievllle and lour blocks from campus. Call Korby 778- 
3084. (68-70) 

TWO FEMALES lor spring semester to share large lour 
bedroom house Private rooms lor $66 plus one Sixth 
utilities Call 937-0904. (67 71) 

NEEDED: TWO roommates lor next semester Pets allowed. 
Cheap and close to campus. Call 776-3570. (67-76) 

FEMALES TO share large furnished apartment. Walk to cam- 
pus $75 month Utilities paid. 539-2683 (87-76) 

LIBERAL MALE to share nice, completely furnished apart- 
ment lor spring semester $90 month plus one third 
utilities. Call Don 778*071.(67-71) 



COZY I COMFY I Private furnished room In large old 
house— two baths, kitchen, washer & dryer, disposal, 
microwave oven, cleaning woman. Mala or female 21 years 
or older. Can move In now— rent starts January 1 $100 
plus utilities. Samara 776*606 (89-78) 

SHARE TWO bedroom apartment In quiet, wooded area. 
Fireplace Your hall -$150, ull lilies included. 776-7298 and 
776-7181 (69-73) 

TWO FEMALE roommates Luxury apartment. Fireplace, 
dishwasher. Call 7780057 alter 5:00 (69-71) 

MALE TO share one bedroom furnished apartment for 
second semester, laundry facllllies, swimming pool, air 
conditioning, transportation to campus $94fmonlh plus 
1/2 utilities. 539-5932, keep trying. (69-73) 

FEMALE WANTED 10 share comfy Wildcat Inn apartment on 
Claflin, call Pam 7764)400 (69-71) 

ONE OR two lo share two bedroom apartment al Wildcat 
Creek wilh two males lor spring semester. 7784843. (89-73) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE; prefer upperclass person Two 
bedroom house, laundry facilities Call this week or 
weekend, 776-8795. (89-71) 

MALE ROOMMATE lor spring semester. Own bedroom. Car- 
peting and dishwasher Two blocks lo campus Call Steve, 
7786183. (70-74) 

ONE OR two roommates lor second semester Large lour 
bedroom house with laundry. Moderate habits required. 
$80 per month 539-7388. (70-74) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted lo share large two bedroom 
apartment. Furnished, fully carpeted and draped. Laundry 
facilities, dishwasher, fireplace, private perking, pool and 
much more Call 539-3604 (70-74) 

KANSAS CITY. Female to share very nice two bedroom. 
almost completely furnished apartment in 
"Mission"— Kansas City. KS. Convenient location right oft 
1 35, close lo Plaza, and Weslport. $150 a month, plus half 
ol utilllles. Great opportunity for person going on block or 
graduating in December Call (913) 382-4966 (70-78) 

FEMALE TO share three bedroom house, washer, dryer. Cell 
after 8:00 p.m., 537-4447 Or day lime 539-7588. Ask lor Jean 
ny. (70-74) 

JANUARY FIRST, female to share two bedroom furnished 
apartment two blocks Irom KSU $67 month plus elec 
Irleity. Call 537-4292. (70-74) 



HELP WANTED 

EXTRA HOURS earn you $500 per 1000 stulllng envelopes 
with our circulars For Information S&S Enterprise, Dept. 
1 1 , P.O. 1 158, Mlddletown, OH 45042. (53-77) 

OVERSEAS JOBS— Summer/full lime Europe. S. America, 
Australia, Asia, etc. All fields. $500-1200 monthly, ex- 
penses paid, sightseeing. Free Info. Write: International 
Job Center, Box 4490-KB, Berkeley, CA 94704 (60-79) 

AGGIE STATION is now taking applications 1<M waitresses 
waiters. Apply In person, 1 1 15 Moro after 4 00 p.m. (85-70) 

BURGER KING wants Individual to work two nights during 
the week. 700 p.m. lo iflO a.m. One weekend nlghl 
required 7:00 p.m. to 3:00 a.m. Start $2.85 par hour. $3 after 
one month Contact Mr. Wagner or Mr. Nelson In person. 
(66-76) 

WAITRESS WAITERS and bus persons part-time work. Good 
working conditions, good wages plus meals. Apply now in 
person to slarl when you come back for second semester. 
Reynard's Res laurant (68-71) 

PART TIME campus representative position available Im- 
mediately Aggressive, highly motivated Individual needed 
to sell Spring Break sun and ski packages. Excellent corn- 
mi salon plus travel bene I its. Cell Summit Travel, Inc. (314) 
674-6171 immediately for an application. (69-72) 

WAITRESSES, WAITERS and bartenders needed Apply at 
. Ftannlgan's, 1122 Moro, allernoons, (70-71) 

BARTENDERS AND floor walkers to work pert-lime. Musi 
work weekends. Apply in person. 1216 Laramie 11:00 a m ■ 
12 noon and i 00 p.m dally, or phone 539-0525 for ap- 
pointment. (70-74) 



SERVICES 



RESUMES WRITTEN Irom scratch, $18 and up. Also general 
typing, writing, editing Fast Action Resumes, 415 M 3rd, 
937-7294 (66-76) 

STEREO REPAIR, over 500 replacement styles In stock. The 
Circuit Shop, 776-1221, 1 204 Moro SI, (B-7B) 

THE OFFSET Press prints anything: resumes, brochures, let- 
terheads, posters, pamphlets, newspapers Lei us do your 
next job. 317 Houston 776-4889. |22-lf) 

ENGAGEMENT RINGS, wedding sets. Custom designing In 
gold and silver Jewelry repair including antique jewelry 
Cuslom Jewelers. 539-3225. 41 1 N. Third (55-74) 

CHRISTMAS PORTRAITS. Pastel, charcoal and pencil 
likeness. Guaranteed, Prices from $5 lo (IS. Live or from 
photo Call 776-3684. (80-76) 



SOUPENE 
COMPUTER 

WHEEL 
ALIGNMENT 

114 South 5th Phone 776-8054 



iS YOUR Volkswagon hard to shift in cold weather? We can 
install a transmission oil that makes your shifter easy to 
shift and protects your transmission batter. Call JiL Bug 
Service for Information. 1-494-2388. (66-70) 

WILL 00 typing (term papers, resumes, etc.). Any type of 
male rial. Am experienced. Call 7764)086. (70-74) 



ATTENTION 

ATTENTION LADIES: KSU loolbell recruiting haa started and 
wa need you lor Kitten Kru Iters. Involves Saturday af- 
ternoons hosting recruits for lunch and lour of Manhattan 
It Interested, call 532-5876 (65-71) 

HAVE A Christmas cookie end en)oy your shopping al Wind- 
fire Jewelry, 230 N. 3rd. Semi-precious gemstone 
necklaces $3.00. Large scenic picture jasper bracelets 
only $3100, regular $47.00. Tiger eye bracelets $10.67 
Crazy lace agate bracelets only $30.00. Mens solid blue 
denim coral chokers (12.00, penshell (10.00. Men's gold 
and sliver natural turquoise rings 50% off, now $34.50. 
Mother ol Pearl stickpins (6.00. bracelets (6.00, rings. 
(6.00. necklaces $10.00 and $8.00 Ail handmade sterling 
silver, turquoise bracelets (8.00 to (26 00. Opal ring 14k 
gold regular (13500, now $10000 Opal necklaces now 
(21.00. Men's and ladies in -color Mk gold rings 25% off. 
Cuslom orders must be made this week on our remaining 
stones, sale prices Included: Free turquoise earrlnga with 
every $45.00 purchase (69-78) 

THE FOLLOWING people have not picked up 1978 Royal Pur- 
ples— get them In Kedzie 103 Msssoud Chitsaz, Lynn D. 
Christie, Douglas Claassen. Crista C. Clark. Steven F. 
Clark. Brent M. Clark, Timothy Cleary, Richard T. Clem 
mons, Seen Cllpsham. (69-71 ( 



HO-HO-ho- and a twig ol mistletoe! Are you Weal Hail 
woman reedy lor the Christmas parry? (70) 

^^ZZ. NOTICES ^^ 

MANHATTAN PAWN Shop, 317 S. 4th Street, 77*- 
6112— stereos, 8-tracka, TV's, typewriters, guitars, 
cameras. Buy-sell -trade. (3-751 

SHIPPING OVERSEAS after graduation' Call Overseas Ship- 
ping Con sultan la tor rates and Iree estimate: 776-5213, 
Box 695, Manhattan. (88-76) 

ATTENTION SNOWSKIIERS: There are still four places 
available on a student bus trip to Winter Park, Colorado, 
January 8-15. Everything Included except load and booze 
tor 5 days ol skiing -only $200, call 778-1 743 (89-7 1 ) 



Lucilles— Westloop 

20% OFF 



AND MORE ON 



EVERYTHING 



IN OUR 
STORE 

until Dec. 25 



BERGGREN STUDIO sale, ceramics and paintings, Saturday, 
December 9. Irom 9:00 am 5:00 p m 1701 Sheffield, (take 
Kimball to Hudson, then south to Sheffield), or cali 536- 
3035 1 or a ppol n I men I . (69 7 1 1 

IF YOU accidenily picked up my green backpack In the Union 
Monday, please return it. or content a, lo Boyd Hall from 
desk— no questional Thanks (69-70) 



Christmas Concerto by Corelli : 
And 

THE HOUSE BY THE 
STABLE 

A Religious Drama In Verse 

By 

Charles Williams 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church 
6th&Poyntz 

Sun. Dec. 10 4:00P.M. 

No Admission Charge 



THE FOLLOWING people have nol picked up 1978 Royal Pur 
pies— get them In Kedzie 103 Massoud Chlisaz, Lynn D. 
Christie, Douglas Claassen, Crista C Clark. Steven F. 
Clark. Brent M. Clark, Timothy Cleary. Richard T. Clem 
mone, Sean Cllpsham (89-71) 



WANTED 



CHRISTIAN ROOMMATE lor spring term Call 539-1513 ask 
tor John (66-72) 

THREE TICKETS lor Cal Poly— Pomona B Bail game Decem- 
ber 9. Call 776-1247. (69-71) 

RIDER WANTED, leaving lor S.E U.S. (Florida) Wedneaday 
the 201 h, to share expenses Call 532 4688, ask lor Lannle. 
(70-72) 



LOST 

BLUE BACKPACK In Derby Food Center including three 
books, important notebooks and calculator. Reward. 902 
Haymaker Hall. 532-3670 (66-70) 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS SR51 A calculator II found contact 
Scott at 537-7200, evenings (70-72) 



FOUND 

FEMALE GERMAN Shepherd pup 12 weeks old, at Manhat 
tan and Thurston Ave. Pteese contacl Animal Shelter 
before Dec. 11.(67-71) 

CALCULATOR. CLAIM and Identity In Weber 117. (68-70) 



FREE 

BLACK, MALE cal about live months old. Two Hilar boxes 
and feeding bowls included— no charge. Call 537-8996 af 
ter 5:00 p.m (69)70) 

PUPPIES: FREE to good homes. German Shepherd 
Dobberman cross. Call John, 776-1258 or Joel, 776-3877. 
(70-72) 



PERSONAL 

SENtORS^DON'T forget Friday's cifl TGIF party at Dark 
Horse Tsvern . Dec . B. 1 0O p .m .-8:00 p. m . (67-71) 

ATTENTION FH: 8.F. haa been rat-napped I Who could have 
done such a lenlble thing? (70) . 

"BIG O", Happy birthday lo the world's beet ).h. I'll gladly be 
your "working partner'' forever. You definitely do good 
work! "H". (70) 

OSCAR (ALIAS Stud). I never thought our dance at K's would 
last a year or cleas work be so much fun. There's e teat on 
the 71b in 540. Happy one year! Love you, Teacher. (70) 



WELCOME 



DANFORTH CHAPEL, al four-thirty every Thursday at 
lemoon', a thirty minute celebration of Holy Communion, 
sponsored by Ecumenical Christian Ministries. Come as 
you are. Celebrating a community of faith. (70) 



19 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Thurs., D*C«mt»r 7.1978 



asssstei 



> 




If you're a little bored 
with every New Year's 
Eve turning out like 
every other New Year's 
Eve, we've got some 
really good news for you. 

It's called the Pa bst- Marshall Tucker 
New Year's Eve Party. It's a real hand 



that comes to you live 
from New Orleans. By 
radio, Just check your 
local listing for the time 
and station. 
Then pick up some 
Pabst Blue Ribbon. And have 
yourself the best New Year's you've 



clapping, loot-stomping rock concert had in years. 

THE PABST-MARSHALLTUCKER NEW YEARS EVE PARTY 



' ! ,\ |fj , Ml ' '!• Mti-W I ...■'■ ■■ '■ ■■ !'.. '■' 



I 



r 



KANSAS STATE lUTNUtt SOCUTT 

TOPEKA. KS 66612 EXCH 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Friday 



December 8, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol.85, No. 71 



nside 



GOOD MORNING, a group of students 
are working together to reach out to 
'different' people. Details page 8... 

FEATURED BE LOW as Star keeper in 
'Carousel/ Dave Greusel is one of the 
students featured in Dimensions, the 
monthly magazine supplement to the 
Collegian. 







Arena vote to students 



Student Senate passed a bill last night 
putting a referendum to raise money for a 
new field house on the ballot of the February 
student government elections. 

The bill is designed to raise $2.5 million 
toward a multipurpose facility to house 
men's and women's basketball, concerts 
and athletic offices by raising student fees in 
1981 by $3.75 for full-time students and $4.50 
for part-time students and by getting 
various funding from alumni groups and the 
state. 

The fee increase will not take effect unless 
substantia] funding has been made by other 
contributors by the spring of 1961 . 

Student Senate is advocating the con- 
struction of a 17,000 or larger seating 
capacity, multipurpose arena. 

"This isn't the first time students have 
had to start the ball rolling on a project like 
this," Rassette said. 

"A very important group this referendum 
will benefit is the future student. In 1985, 
students would be able to hear the words of a 
concert and everyone could have a 
basketball ticket," he said. "I wish that 
instead of burning down a castle in 1968, the 
students would have thought ahead." 

Brian Rassette. sponsor of the referen- 
dum proposal, pointed out three problems 
with Ahearn Field House: the problem with 
ticket sales, the problem with the facilities 
for concerts and the problem with basket- 
ball recruitment. 

Students currently receive 6,350 tickets 
from the available 11,200 seats in Ahearn. 
There are approximately 17-18,000 students 



enrolled at K-State. Potentially 11,500 
students are not able to attend basketball 
games because of the seating capacity at 
Ahearn. 

THE PROBLEM with concerts at Ahearn, 
Rassette said, was the poor acoustics, which 
make only soft rock groups and single ar- 
tists sound good. 

Rassette also said because of the small 
number of seats, top-notch music groups 
cannot be brought to K-State, Many of these 
groups require at least 15,000 minimum 
seating capacity to even consider per- 
forming. 

Rassette listed Ahearn 's third problem as 
one of recruitment. Quality athletes look not 
only to a strong basketball program but also 
to a quality facility. An impressive facility 
would enhance recruitment possibilties, he 
said. 

Sam Brownback, student body president, 
said K-State could probably wait 20 years 
for the Legislature to finance a new arena, 
but he said the Legislature is much more 
willing to help those who help themselves. 

Points made about the disadvantages of 
the current facility center around its 
overuse. 

"Ahearn is used so often and so long and 
so hard that there is no time for main- 
tainence," said DeLoss Dodds, K-State 
athletic director. 

AHEARN is in use approximately 136 
hours a week with only four hours of 
maintenance per day , Rassette said. 



Representatives from alumni groups, K- 
State administration and the city of 
Manhattan spoke supporting the bill. 

"We have a great deal at stake in the 
tradition of basketball, we have pride in the 
basketball team and we want to keep that 
pride in the tradition," Dodds said. 

Dodds said to keep in tradition, K-State 
basketball needs more exposure, which a 
new arena could provide. He added a new 
fieldhouse could also bring in new people 
and groups from the outside to see K-State 
play basketball. 

"It will take the combined effort of all 
people to make it happen, and everybody 
will benefit from it (the arena)," said Chet 
Peters, vice president for academic affairs. 
"Most arenas of this type have been a 
cooperative effort, by any way they could 
put a package together to make a workable 
facility." 

MANHATTAN Chamber of Commerce 
president-elect Bill Varney said that at a 
Chamber of Commerce retreat, chamber 
officers, commissioners, and school board 
members voted to support the referendum. 

"Basically the chamber is a catalyst 
which will support community im- 
provements," he said. "If the student body 
doesn't put something in, the chance for a 
fieldhouse diminishes." 

Dr. Roger Reitz, an alumnus, said the 
fieldhouse would maintain a good school 
image which is an important aspect of a 
school's alumni perspective. 



Representation 



Mural presents minorities' histories, lifestyles 



By JEAN HARNESS 

Collegian Reporter 

A mural is being painted on the fourth floor of Farrell Library 
in the minorities section— a mural representing four minority 
groups on campus. 

MEChA. Black Student Union, Native American Indian 
Student Body, and Hispanic Student Union have each appointed 
a person to convey group ideas to the artists of the mural. 

"The mural did not actually start being painted until the 
middle of October and I hope it is completed by Dec. 19," said 
Travis Mosley, senior in art and one of the two artists. 

"With finals and all, I still am not sure if we will meet our 
projected completion date," Mosley said. 

"The process is slow. We are painting on a wallpaper surface 
which is very porous and requires two coats of paint," he said. 

"For a project like this, SGA funds cannot be used; each 
minority group is earning money by doing different fund raising 
events," said Antonia Pigno, director of the minority resource 
research center. 

"ALL THE SUPPLIES will cost about $100— plus we have had 
donations from Cook Paint," she said. 

"We have had the idea for the mural for a long time now, but 
did not start inquiring about cost and getting the approvals to do 
the mural till last spring," Pigno said. 

"I feel this mural expresses some of the ideas and images of 
the different minorities of this time," said Willie McDonald, 
sophomore in sociology and the other artist working on the 
mural. 

"I think it was a great privilege that I was asked to work on 
the mural," he said. "1 personally have gotten a better insight of 
other histories and backgrounds of minorities in working on the 
mural." 

"Travis and Willie showed a personal interest in the mural 
and offered to do the artwork. Travis is getting credit through 
his mural class and Willie is doing it for self-satisfaction," she 
said. 

Alter the painters had been selected, each organization 
combined ideas, pictures and objects to give the artists so they 
could lie the picture together. 

"THE FIRST composed mural was disapproved. Each 
organization had various things in the composition they felt did 
not truthfully represent them. I drew up another plan and it was 
readily accepted," Mosley said. After all the groups came to an 
agreement, the rest was up to Willie and myself," Mosley said. 

"Looking at the mural you can see the American flag unifies 
the whole mural, with the exception of the American Indian who 
does nol represent itself with the American flag. The American 
Indian looks at their nation as a different nation. So we have 



represnted the American Indian in the far left-hand side of the 
mural," Mosley said. 

In this section, America is painted in white with a pale blue 
backgound, separated from the American flag background. A 
superimposed Indian head will be placed over the American 
continent. The other symbolic objects painted in this portion of 
the mural are the tomahawk, eagle, peace pipe and buffalo. 

TO THE RIGHT of the American Indian presentation is the 
depiction of the black American. It overlaps the image of the 
American flag. Painted partially over the flag are the American 
continent, a slave ship, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, and a 
black man and women superimposed over the African con- 
tinent. 

As the family unit is important to Mexican and Spanish 
Americans, a picture of a family is superimposed over the flag 
in the last section of the mural. Shown is Caesar Chavez 
representing modern Mexican American struggles, and Zapata 
representing historical struggles. 





Sf«ff photos by Craig Chandler 

ABOVE. ..Willie McDonald, 
sophomore in sociology, touches 
up a stripe on the mural. 
BE LOW... Travis Mosley, senior 
in art, stands in front of the 
partially completed mural. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri., Paoambar ft, tST8 



Cam pus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

APPLICATIONS are being lateen though Dec. IS tor the 

coordinated undergraduate program In dietetics, tee 
ProtettOr Roacti in Justin 107 

THE INTERNATIONAL CHRISTMAS PARTY Is St 7 

tonight in the international Student Center; all student* 
are Invited. 

ASME CHRISTMAS BANQUET Is tonight; tickets are 

available in Seaton 108. 

FRUIT C AK ES are now on sale In Sheilenberger Ml . 

MEChA will host the coffeehouse "La Celebration" at ■ 
p m. Sunday in the Union C alike Her. 



Education reading room 
to lose night personnel 

The Education Reading Room in Farrell 
Library will be unstaffed after 5 p.m. week- 
days and on weekends beginning Jan. 17 of 
next year. 

The room will remain open for patrons to 
use the material may not be checked out 
when the staffleaves. 

For patrons such as commuters who are 
unable to use the library between 8a.m. and 
5 p.m. special arrangements may be made 
with the education staff before 5 p.m. for 
items to be checked out and left at the 
general reference desk. 



TODAY 

KANSAS ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT SOCIAL 
WORKERS will meet in Union 104 at 10 a.m. 
CAMPUS SCOUT CAMPOUT Is in Ford Hall lobby at 5 
p m 

SENIOR CLASS TO IF party is at Dark Horse Tavern It 
p.m. 

WEIHNACHTiFESTI»atl637Falrchildat7:30p.m. 

SATURDAY 

NEWMAN MINISTRIES will have a Christmas Dinner In 
the Union Flinthlin Room ate p.m.. a dance will lollow at 
St, Isidore's Catholic Church at' Mpm 

SUNDAY 

K-LAIRES will meet in the Union Ballroom at 1 p.m. 

RHOMATES will meet at the Alpha Gamma Rho House at 
7 p.m. 

SHIRE OF THE SPINNING WINDS will meet In Union 70S 
at S :30 pm. 

MONDAY 
RHOMATES will meet at the Alpha Gamma Rho House at 
7 p.m. lor initiation, please wear dress. 

CHI ALPHA will meet in Union 709 at 7 30 p.m. 

BUMP ATHON dancers wl II meet at Mother's Worry at 5 : 30 

p.m 

CAMPUS SCOUTS will meet In Ford Hall lobby at 6:15 
p.m. before going carolling. 

K SU RODEO CLUE will meet In Weber 130 at 7 : 30 p. m. 

ARTS AND SCIENCE COUNCIL wilifneel in Union Ml at 7 
p.m.' T l 

ALPHA 2ETA will meet in the Union Bio a Room at 7 p.m. 

CAMPUS HIGH LIFE will meet in Union 708 at 7 30 pen 



ScHER SANTA 
. <§H0PS, 
cAT^ELLERS 




ii Aviance Kiti 

AV1ANCE 

from Prince MatCbabali 

Gift bo* of Spray pertain* 

and Cologne Spray mtat . 



UbYMtD iMf LIB, 

rlANHATMMJ 5T€fRf fOR. W&HtN 




Opan T hursday Night Till 8:30 p^ 

323 poyntt 



X-MAS HOURS AT WARD M. KELLERS AND KELLERS TOO 

Starting Dec. 1 1th Mon. thruFri. 9:30-8:30 

Saturday 9:30-5:30 Open Sundays Dec. 3rd. I0th& 17th 1-5 p.m. 



MAKE IT 
WITH 



JUAREZ 

TEQUILA 

GOLD ON SILVER 

IMfORTEO ft MHILED BY tfOUIla JALISCO S A 

SI LOUIS M0 . «0 PROOF 




TEXACO 

takes you to the Met 
for an enjoyable 
experi ence 

All live on radio, direct from 
the Metropolitan Opera House 

SATURDAY RADIO SCHEDULE 



DATE OPERA COMPOSER 


cr. 


1978 








Dec. 


2 BARTERED BRIDE 


S met ana 


1:00 P.M. 


Dec 


9 CARMEN 


Bizet 


12:30 P.M. 


Dec. 


16 A1DA 


Verdi 


1:00 P.M. 


Dec. 


23 HANSEL and GRETEL 


Humperdinck 


1:00 P.M. 


Dec. 


30 ELEKTRA 


Strauss 


1:00 P.M. 


1979 








Jan. 


6 TOSCA 


Puccini 


1:00 P.M. 


Jan. 


13 DIALOGUES of the 








CARMELITES 


Poulenc 


1:00 P.M. 


Jan. 


20 DONPASQUALE 


Donizetti 


1:00 P.M. 


Jan. 


27 LUISA MILLER 


Verdi 


1:00 P.M. 


Feb. 


3 WERTHER 


Massenet 


1:00 P.M. 


Feb. 


10 MADAMA BUTTERFLY Puccini 


1:00 P.M. 


Feb. 


17 DIE ZAUBERFLOETE 


Mozart 


1:00 P.M. 


Feb. 


24 DON CARLO 


Verdi 


12:00 Noon 


Mar. 


3 R1GOLETTO 


Verdi 


1:00 P.M. 


Mar. 


10 ARIADNE aufNAXOS 


Strauss 


1:00 P.M. 


Mar. 


17 NORMA 


Bellini 


1:00 P.M. 


Mar. 


24 EUGENE ONEGIN 


Tchaikovsky 


1:00 P.M. 


Mar. 


31 BILLY BUDD 


Britten 


1:00 P.M. 


Apr. 


7 DERFLIEGENDE 








HOLLAENDER 


Wagner 


1:00 P.M. 


Apr. 


14 PARSIFAL 


Wagner 


1 2:00 Noon 



BROUGHT TO YOU FOR TH EJ9TH CONSECUTIVE SEASON BY 

ItexacoI 



Sche dule Subject to Ch ange 

SPECIAL LIVE TELEVISION PRODUCTIONS ON 
PUBLIC BROADCASTING SERVICE 

Tosca- December 19, 1978 (Tuesday Evening) 
Luisa Miller- Ja nuary 20, 1979 (S aturday Evening) 

Please send quiz questions to Texaco Opera Quiz, 
135 East 42nd Street, New York, New York 10017 



TUNE IN RADIO KM AN 1350 



\ 



KANSAS STATE COLLEOIAN, Frl.,Ooc—ntof S.HTO 



+* 



Briefly 



White House gets tax shelter 

WASHINGTON— A $20,000 concrete block garden shed has been 
constructed on the White House lawn to hold lawn mowers, a jeep for 
snow removal, seed, fertilizer, a motorized scavenger to pick up 
leaves and paper, and other garden implements. 

But tourists are unlikely to see the new structure which is 
camouflaged by dense shrubbery. 

Liz: more roles than just wife 

WASHINGTON— Actress Elizabeth Taylor Warner says she in- 
tends to take on more roles than just being the wife of Sen. -elect John 
Warner (R-Va.). 

She was presented the Louis D. Brandeis Award Wednesday night 
and praised for "endless devotion to the land, the people and the 
future of Israel." 

Mrs. Warner said she may do a television show next year and also 
would like to do some work with veterans hospitals and children's 
homes, 



'Peace' comes to Key Biscay ne 

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla.— Cora the rhinoceros gave birth to a 60-to 
65-pound calf Thursday at the Crandon Park Zoo, zoo officials said. 

The baby rhino was tentatively named Amani— "peace" in 
Swahili— said Dan Brennan, executive director of the Zoological 
Society of Florida. 

The birth at 3:50 a.m. culminated a vigil of more than six months 
since the society first noticed the several-ton beast was expecting, 
Brennan said. Zoological Society member Rita Sgro was on duty 
when the calf was born, he added. 

Mother and calf were reported doing well. 



Nader to Carter: set an example 

CHICAGO— Consumer advocate Ralph Nader has made public a 
letter urging President Carter to cut his $200,000-a-year salary in 
half as an example to government officials across the nation. 

Nader commented Wednesday on government pay raises amid a 
furor set off by plans of the Chicago City Council to raise aldermen's 
salaries 60 percent, from $17,500 a year to $28,000. 



'Indecent? 9 Postal Service's classical gaffe 

GARDEN CITY— Three Garden City women have complained 
that the U.S. Postal Service is selling indecent material— Christmas 
commemorative stamps depicting a naked baby Jesus. The stamp 
depicts a sculpture by the 15th century artist Andrea della Robbia 
titled "Madonna and Child with Cherubim," on display at the 
National Gallery of Art in Washington. 

Garden City postal clerk Mrs. Tom Claire said one woman brought 
her roll of stamps back because they were "indecent." "She asked 
me to look. I looked and I still didn't see anything. I looked again and 
she said the child wasn't clothed and that she wouldn't put the stamp 
on her cards," Mrs. Claire said- 
Two other women came in on separate occasions to return their 
stamps for the same reason, Mrs. Claire said. 



...Just In time for Christmas, too! 

SAN CLEMENTE, Calif.— Former President Richard Nixon's 
memoirs have caught on in his hometown, thanks in part to Nixon's 
decision to sign markers for insertion into copies of the book sold at 
one bookstore. 

"It was something he decided to do for the local people," says 
Phyllis Wentz, co-owner of San Clemente's Book Site bookstore. 

Wentz said she and her partner, Jo Olsen, asked members of 
Nixon's staff if he would inscribe all copies of "The Memoirs of 
Richard Nixon" sold at their store in this coastal city 65 miles south- 
west of Los Angeles. 

The store owners said they did no special advertising of the 
arrangement beyond posting a sign in the window of the shop. Since 
then, the store has sold more than 1,600 copies. 

News of the signature cards, including wishes for a "happy an- 
niversary" or "happy birthday," signed by the former president, 
spread quickly. Copies sell for $19.95. An autographed copy bought 
from the publisher sells for $250. 



WeatRer 



International Christmas Festival 




7: 00 Friday 



Dec. 8 




International Student Center 



All Students Welcome 

Refreshments will be provided 

Tree trimmings and a program on how Christmas 

is celebrated in other countries Is planned. 

Sponsored by: ICC. Spurs. Phi Upsllon Omlcron, UFM 



fltf* 



rf* 



The Club... 
flat's not i Club. 



m 




Impress thai someone special 

in elegant dining. Mkhebb and 

Coors on tap. Try the... 

BACKROOM 



ftoyiMftft Atttauranf in thm W»l-M*rt Shopping Cwtfor 




Today will be partly sunny with highs in the low to mid 20s. 
Saturday will be partly cloudy to clear with highs mid-20s to 30. 



Put the perfect gift 
under her tree 
this Christmas 

Select your perfect Keepsake diamond ring 

at Holiday Jewelers to make this season 

one you 11 always remember. 




425 POYNTZ MANHATTAN, KANSAS 



Opinions 



Good job, Beccy ! 

It's not often you read an editorial praising someone, but it's not 
often you meet and work with someone like Beccy Tanner. 

After giving her time and energy to the Collegian for six 
semesters, Beccy is graduating. Although she wrote her final 
column in her usual good-natured and whimsical tone, Beccy side- 
stepped the immense contributions she has made to the Collegian 
and the University by way of her articles. 

Few people would put up with the constant criticism Beccy has 
endured during her tenure at the Collegian. She has been called 
names, harrassed over the telephone and consistently belittled by 
some readers. What is really amazing about this is she never 
allowed any of her critics to stop her from doing her job—telling a 
story. 

Her stories have always been controversial. Incest, rape, 
Christianity, female and male prostitution, the occult and Billy 
Graham are just some of the stories she has tackled, Beccy knew 
what was coming when she wrote htr articles, but she kept on 
writing them because she is a journalist who realizes even the 
ugliest of stories must be told if readers are to be informed about a 
problem. 

I hope someone attempts to take Beccy 's place as the bearer of 
unpleasant news at K -State. If society is to be informed about its 
problems, it must be willing to acknowledge their existence. The 
people who involve themselves in unpleasantries so others may be 
informed deserve all the help, encouragement and congratulations 
society can bestow. 

DOUGLASS DANIEL 

Editorial Editor 




a— a. 



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•gt, ' ' i r — t 



i H ii » i ■ i f ■■ JiiriT ii 

. L. I "! **'! 1 i 



"I " 1 1 1 ill A ' 



Nbcvlodk-the feet th^t 
\Toda\/55tudent picks us to 
^ win ty 28 tomorrow^ does I 
not mean we can afford to 
sit around- 3o wtiat if ife 
k a religious paper?Tbxy] 
scout teams the same 
Way as tiwivst of us, 
right? Right? 




& 



Letters 



Buying to the ring 
of a different cash register 



Editor, 

Re : "We aren 't buying. " 

Ms. Coles, how can you be so narrow- 
minded? I think that if you checked around 
town you would have found dress shoes not 
only of the sandal type. Women are enjoying 
the practical side of fashion along with the 
fashiona ble aspect . 



*2S Collegian"'^' 

Friday, December 8, 1978 

THE COLLEGIAN is published by Student 
Publications. Inc.. Kansas State University, dally 
except Saturday, Sundays, holidays and vacation 
periods. 

offices are tn the north wine ot Kediie Hall, phone 

533 6555 

SECOND CLASS postage paid at Manhattan. Kansas 
MM!. 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: *1S, one calendar year. 
17 50, one semester 

TH* COLLEGIAN functions in a legally autonomous 
relationship with the University and is written and 
edited by students serving the University community 

Paul Rhodes Editor 
Terry Brungardt, Advertising Manager 



When you stated, "every woman's dream 
is to be the ideal fashion plate, no matter the 
discomfort or the expense," I believe you 
are over -generalizing. People are more 
realistic than you seem to be or give them 
credit for. We all have different lifestyles 
and are given a wide variety of fashion to 
help us feel comfortable, Ms. Coles. 

Just because your lifestyle is not in tune 
with a great many others, don't condemn 
them for their choices. 

Kalhryn Walker 
sophomore in fashion marketing 

Smoke off 

Editor, 

Either some smokers can't read or they 
believe those of us who would rather breathe 
untainted air aren't worthy of the places 
reserved for this privilege. 

Dale Eatinger 
senior in accounting 




© 



© 



© 



ftti 




The last of Tanner 



I really don't know how to approach this 
subject, for it's just as dramatic as the soap 
operas and as heart-throbby as any Lassie 
or Walton show. It is the death of a Tanner. 

Yes, after six semesters on the Collegian 
staff I'm finally being written off the page; 
inked out. 



Becc y lamer 



Actually, I'm graduating. And as soon as I 
pay my parking ticket fines and rent, I'll get 
my diploma. 

Now for some, like professors, sources 
and dissatisfied Collegian readers for 
example, it comes as a relief to hear this 
most final of all final statements. Already 
they are telling themselves, ' 'Thank God the 
broad is leaving. Now, at last maybe the 
Collegian will have a decent amount of 
respectability and credibility. Gone are the 
days of soupy, yellow journalism and sick 
sensationalism." 

■ And indeed, perhaps they are right, for as 
sure as sugar comes from the sugar cane in 
Hawaii, 1 am leaving. But like the Rev. Jim 
Jones of Guyana, I have my followers. And, 
because they have been so faithful, I enclose 
for them the recipe which will help them 
through the withdrawal symptoms of no 
B.T. 

Take a typical story, one which is kind of 
cute, nice. Put on your cynical sunglasses, 
add a touch of sarcasm, lace heavily with 
bad taste. And you will have the news by 
B.T., or so you have been told. 

And for the faithful I will remind them 
that even though I won't be here in body, I 
will be with them in spirit. And who knows, 
there is a good chance the Collegian will one 
day carry the syndicated columns of Beccy 
Tanner. 

When people die, or so I have been told, 
before their final earthly moment, they 
quickly review their life, recalling the 
highlights. In my death as a Collegian staff 
writer, I am no exception. I am a K-State 
legend, in my own mind. 

When I was a Reporting 2 student, I was 
nothing exceptional. Some of you are still 
telling me I'm nothing exceptional. It is 
important, in my last of all columns, to clear 
the record. 

I think my debut as a journalist really 
began with a five-part series on the occultic 
supernatural. That was two years ago, and I 
still get repercussions from the stories. 

"Oh, YOU'RE Beccy Tanner. Well, I 
didn't believe a word you printed in that 



filthy scumbag of a rag you work for. I knew 
you couldn't be a Christian. You're nothing 
more than a two-bit cub reporter." 

They were partly right, for I still am a 
cub. I haven't had much "real" experience 
in the "real" world. But I am a Christian, 
and for those who find it necessary to know 
how long, it has been five years. Ah, but I 
can hear some telling themselves, "Well, I 
don't think she is a very good one from those 
articles she writes. No Christian would dare 
write such filthy trash." 

After the occultic stories there was the 
Total Woman story and Marabelle Morgan 
( it made some of you quite angry ) . And then 
there was one on loneliness, Anita Bryant 
and the homosexuals, incest, male 
prostitution, the Holocaust and born-again 
Christians. 

And then there were this semester's 
goodies: Billy Graham, death, Jerry Lewis, 
cancer and one called "Is the Bible Sexist?" 
(Come to think of it, I think they all made 
you angry in one way or another. ) 

"You know, Tanner, you're really a sick 
person. Sick, I tell you. Sick. Sick. Sick. 
Only a sick mind would come up with those 
kind of stories." 

Remember my columns? I mean, like, my 
family doesn't really grow marijuana. And, 
like hey man, we know what Acapulco Gold 
is. My toenails don't really rip my molded- 
peanut-butter-fitted bed sheets, and we 
don't have vacuum cleaner salesmen who 
slide off the Wild Horse Creek Bridge. 

My family is a very loving, giving family 
and they are sometimes highly intelligent. I 
can't help it if I'm a product of their 
imagination. 

It is now time to bid farewell to my 
readers. Good-bye, Beccy -Tanner- We-Hate- 
Your-Guts Club, good-bye fellow Christians, 
Anderson Hall (Fort Knox of Kansas) and 
KedzieHall. 

Should any of you miss me when I'm gone, 
go to the edge of town and look for little 
footprints in the snow. You'll find me at the 
end of the trail writing this garbage, AND 
GETTING PAID FOR IT. 

Like Richard Nixon, you won't have me to 
kick around anymore. Let me make one 
thing perfectly clear, I may have retired 
from campus life, but I have not retired fom 
public life. Farewell, sweet K-State. 

Love and kisses, 

the folks, Rosetta Stone, 

Bad Taste, and Old Bee 

P.S. Dad, I've told the truth, can I come 

home for Christmas now? 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frl., D*cemb«r 8. 1978 



Letters 



Thanks again 



Disappointed by 
one-sided view 



Editor, 



Editor, 

The article on prescription drugs angers 
and disappoints me. I am disappointed 
because I would like to think that this piece 
of journalism could do better than 
presenting a one-sided view. Although the 
facts on how the Collegian obtained the 
drugs are true, I 'm not sure the conclusions 
drawn are totally valid. 

There are a few points which appear to 
have been overlooked. There are problems 
that need to be resolved at Lafene, but you 
will find these same problems at just about 
every clinic across the nation ; in some cases 
to a far graver degree. 

I'm not saying I condone what might be 
wrong with student health. I am saying the 
problems are universal and not specific to 
Lafene. Addiction to legal drugs is 
universal. The growing demand for sleeping 
pitls, tranquilizers and a nti -depressants is 
universal, and Lafene has no more power to 
stop the problem at this point than any other 
medical institution. 

It is also true that in some cases the doctor 
may neglect to inform the patient of harmful 
side effects specific to each drug. However, 
this isn't the sole responsibility of the 



physician. Since it is the body of the patient 
involved, 1 see it as his or her right and need 
to ask about any drug. 

How can we be angry if we don't care 
enough to ask about what is going into our 
own bodies? It doesn't appear that anyone 
forceably refrained Collegian personnel 
from asking. Both patient and physician are 
to blame here. 

It seems that in every semester of my four 
and a half years at K-State, somebody 
launches an attack on Lafene's practices, 
competence and ethics. I would like to point 
out that Lafene does have good points. 1 
have been a diabetic for most of my life and 
require comprehensive medical attention. 
Every medical need that I have had has 
been dealt with very well at Lafene. 

The situations under which the research 
for this article was done were fabricated 
and therefore loses some of its validity. 
Constructive criticism is good and healthy. 
It promotes growth and improvement in any 
situation, but let's keep it to constructive 
criticism and not a blast at Lafene founded 
on evidence from a rigged situation. 

Anne Barth 
senior in speech 



Wednesday night, north of Ackert Hall, at 
3 a.m. our car ran out of gas. We were 
fortunate enough to have two Security and 
Traffic officers drive by. They gave us a 
ride to a gas station, a ride back to the car, 



and gave us a jump when we found our 
battery was dead. 

We just wanted to thank them again and 
tell everyone on campus that the officers do 
more than give out parking tickets. 

Scott Brenenum 
freshman in mechanical engineering 




WATCH FOR THE NEW 

Hardeer 

3116 Anderson 



Lafene staff 
'competent, responsible' 



POINSETTIA 



Editor, 

Re: Julie Doll's article on Lafene Health 
Center. 

This article has given the fine staff that 
serves the students of this campus at Lafene 
Health Center the label of irresponsibility. 
The staff at Lafene is the best that has ever 
worked under the roof at Lafene, and they 
are competent, responsible and concerned 
about the students they see. 

They do prescribe medication to ease and 
relieve symptoms of discomfort that ac- 
company the illnesses that students are 
complaining of. That is the major reason for 
prescribing the medication, even though 
most illnesses will pass in time. 

1 know the Collegian staff likes to pick on 
certain departments across the campus to 
keep them on their toes, but why give the 
students who know varying amounts of 
information about the situation a muddy 
picture about the department. 

My question is: what did the Collegian do 
with the medication it was given? (They 
sure didn't need it, as they were not as sick 
with the illnesses they exaggerated, even 



ATTENTION 
BB FANS! 



though white jackets with extra long sleeves 
are not that hard to find . ) 

My guess is that they take two before each 
interview, one in each ear. 

Chris Southwick 
senior in pre-medlclne ^p—~- — '~ J - 



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union bookstore 





That's right! The Union Bookstores used 
book program saved K State students better 
than $250,00000 this year That's more than 
$13.60 a student! How did we do it*? By using com- 
mon sense. Instead of sending big checks off to 
the publishers for our textbook stock, we prefer 
to put it in your hands in cash when we buy your 
books It makes sense, the savings add up fast, 
and what's more, we've been doing it for you for 
years As a result, the average student's book ex- 
penses are reduced by about one-fifth 

Here are the details: First, we pay 20% more 
for your books than is currently available at 
other dealers. Second, these exceptionally high 
prices attract a lot of books- literally tons of 
them, so our stocks a re the largest in Manhattan, 
bar none! (One out of every three course books 
sold at the Union this year was a used book > 
With such a high volume of used copies 



U 



k state un ion 



bookstore 



available, and since you save twice on used 
books (once when you but it, and again when you 
sell it> it is easy to see why the net result is such 
a huge savings It's a fact that the Union puts 
more cash in the hands of K-State students than 
anybody else in the book business. You couldn t 
save more if you bought ail new books at 

wholesale! 

So why are we buying this ad? Not just to 
blow our own horn We figure that if you know 
the facts, you can save yourself a lot of money. 
So we bought this ad to convince you that there 
are only two simple steps to save money on your 

textbooks' 

1. Sell your books at the Union— you save 

because we pay more. 

2 Buy your books at the Union— you save 
because we have more used books. 

So, gather up all those books lying around 
the apartment or dorm room, and sell them at 
the Union (in front of Forum Hall) From Dec. 11 
Thru Dec 22 Then, come see us agau. 
during registration. Remember, we save you 
more, and we can prove it. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri.. D«c«mb«r 8. 1 978 



Analyst cites records 
as cause of mix-up 



A computer analyst claims only part of 
the responsibility in a computer mix-up 
which may have left some 1,500 K-State 
students temporarily without correct spring 
pre-enrollment schedules. 

Sam Burton, operations manager at K- 
State's data processing, denies part of the 
blame for what J era Id Dallam, associate 
director of admissions and records, labeled 
in a Wednesday Collegian story a "com- 
puter operator error." 

"The problem was not totally a computer 
operator error," Burton said. "There was a 
problem relaying information between the 
office of records and data processing. The 
information sent to us was assumed to be 
correct by the computer operator and the 
machine did just what the programmer told 
it to do." 

Burton said the computer and computer 

Coeds return to dorm 
after Wednesday blast 

ATCHISON <AP>— Damage from an 
explosion at a women's dormitory on the 
south campus of Benedictine College was 
expected to run $15,000 to $25,000, a college 
spokesman said Thursday. 

Two coeds were slightly injured. No 
structural damage was reported, according 
to the Rev. Gerard Seneca 1, college 
president. 

He said the explosion occurred during the 
annual switch from natural gas to propane 
fuel. 

The blast damaged the boiler room and 
basement of the dormitory and broke 
windows on three floors of the building. 



operators are used as "fall guys" if 
anything should go wrong . 

"I'm not trying to absolve data 
processing," Burton said. "This situation is 
simply an example of miscommunication 
between us ( records and data processing)." 

Burton said the office of records should 
share in the blame of the improperly printed 
schedules by not checking the schedules 
before sending them to students. 

"With any user, they should check the 
output for correctness," Burton said. 



Mivnr 



David McEndarffer 

Happiest of 21st 

Birthdays to you. You have 

been a really special son! 

From those who love you most 

M/D 



ii 



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FRIDAY 

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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri., Pocofflbf8,1«l 



' 



HEW tightens reins 
on university research 



By KAREN CARLSON 
Collegian Reporter 

The Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare (HEW) has extended its research 
regulations on human subjects one step 
further for universities across the United 
States. 

For years government has been making 
requirements and regulations stiffer for 
research guidelines, which call for greater 
expenses for research at K-State, according 
to John Murry, associate dean of the 
graduate school who works with sponsored 
programs. 

Since K-State receives funds from HEW 
for research projects, it must comply with 
the regulations set for them. 

In addition to the signed consent of a 
human subject, HEW has made it clear that 
the subject must be informed of the 
availability of medical finance com- 
pensation in case of physical injury. This 
will go into effect Feb. 2, 1979. 

K-State cannot provide insurance for the 
subject to pay medical costs in case of any 
injury, and this must be stated on the in- 
formed consent paper, Murry said. 

"Of course, it scares off many subjects 
and makes them think that they are not 



being told something they should/ he said. 
"This will hamper many research projects 
atKnState." 

Subjects willing to participate in a 
research project have to sign the informed 
consent paper. While they read it, they get to 
the part about physical injury and im- 
mediately think something will happen to 
them even if no possible harm could be done, 
Murry said. 

"It raises an unnecessary red flag," he 
said. "For example, the Department of 
Engineering was doing a study on how well 
people study at different temperatures. 
They wanted to see if there was any ideal 
temperature. If this addition to the informed 
consent was required then, it would 
probably scare many people off." 

Murry said he believes the government is 
intruding too much on research methods 
and requirements. 

This last regulation for providing in- 
surance for subjects in case of injury has 
displeased the Human Subject Committee, 
Murry said. 

"It's costing around $35,000 a year to do all 
the reviewing and research," he said. 
"Requirements are just being stretched too 
far." 



Pot heist recalls French Connection 



NEW YORK <AP>— The theft of 1,300 
pounds of marijuana worth $400,000 on the 
street and being held as trial evidence in a 
heavily guarded, government-leased 
warehouse may have been an inside job, 
authorities said Thursday. 

"We've narrowed down quite sub- 
stantially the field of suspects," according 
to Michael Costello, deputy chief of in- 
telligence for the federal Drug Enforcement 
Administration (DEA). 

The theft recalled the famous 1972 
"French Connection" case in which 81 
pounds of heroin worth $73 million was 
stolen from the New York City Police 
Department's property clerk's office. 



The Brooklyn building, leased by several 
federal agencies, had controlled access and 
the Drug Enforcement Administration said 
people entering the facility had to sign in 
whenever they entered. 

He identified the building as the Eagle 
Warehouse at 28 Cadman Plaza West, near 
Brooklyn's civic center. 

Coetello said only the DEA had keys to its 
storage room. However, the thieves entered 
through an upper level of the building 
Monday night or Tuesday morning, then 
smashed their way through an inner wall 
into the locked storage room leased by DEA 
where 25 bales of marijuana, weighing 50 
pounds each, were stored. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. FrI., D*C«mb«r 8,1978 



Arts & Entertainment 







Events 



Slat) photo by Sue Plannmuller 



PUPPETEERING PRACTICE... Laura Donnelly, 
senior in dance, shares a laugh with Jamie as some of 
the students practice their parts in the puppet show 



during a rehearsal Sunday in the basement of the 
United Methodist Church. 



By DEBBIE NEFF 
Collegian Reporter 

Timothy is a "special" person 

His smile resonates in the deepest silence. 
His outstretched arms speak to anyone who 
will listen— anyone who will accept him as 
he is. 

You see. Timothy is "different." Timothy 
often faces west while the rest of the world is 
facing east. He hears sounds that come from 
a different direction. 

And often, mistaking his peculiarities for 
a lack of talent or creativity, people greet 
Timothy with the sound of silence. 

But not always. Every once in a while a 
group of exceptional people come along who 
understand why Timothy is so "special." 

Exceptional people like Diane Dollar, 
Miriam Hughes, Laura Donnelly and Janet 
Sunderland have found a way of greeting 
Timothy, and other retarded persons like 
him, with the sound of love. 

DOLLAR. AN art instructor at K-State, 
has been working with Manhattan's han- 
dicapped citizens for the past three years in 
the areas of theater, dance, art and music. 
She said she became interested in starting a 
program in arts for the handicapped here 
when she realized how many people are 
given no opportunity for utilizing their talent 
and creativity in the arts. 

Grants from the Kansas Arts Council, the 
Manhattan Federation of Retarded Citizens 
and the College Avenue Methodist Church 
provided funds for this semester's program 
in puppetry. Some of those participating in 
the program attend the Big Lakes 
Developmental Center which provides 
transportation. 

The group, which includes persons of all 
ages, meets every Sunday afternoon at the 
Methodist Church. Working with puppetry 
allows the student to experiment with art 



while constructing puppets and also to work 
with theater, music and dance movement 
concepts while performing. 

MIRIAM HUGHES, senior in art, joined 
the group this semester to work with the 
project. Hughes worked as an illustrator in 
Chicago for five years and has had con- 
siderable experience designing 
marionettes. 

"It's been real challenging to take what I 
know about puppets and adapt it to this 
environment," Hughes said. She said she is 
pleased with the progress of her students. 

"Some of them didn't even want to touch 
the puppets." she said. "They were afraid to 
put them on their hands. But once they got 
behind the stage they were real hams." 

Dance exercises and puppetry movement 
are the responsibility of Laura Donnelly, a 
senior in dance who became interested in 
the project through a class in movement 
exploration. Donnelly works primarily with 
movement designed to develop balance and 
cordi nation. 

"They need to explore movement because 
most of them have sedentary jobs," she 
said. "I try to use movement they'll have 
fun with." 

JANET SUNDERLAND, a graduate 
student in speech, works with the voice and 
diction problems and with helping the 
students develop stage presence for per- 
forming. She said the progress of the 
students is hard to measure. 

"I measure progress by whether or not 
they're having a good time," she said. 

At their first performance Dec. 1 at a 
dinner for the Manhattan Federation of 
Retarded Citizens, students seemed to be 
having the time of their life. 

The students stand behind a large wooden 
puppet box to manipulate the puppets 



talent 



during the show, which includes hula 
dancers, a magician, can-can dancers and 
singing banditos. 

Dollar said she hopes to secure enough 
funds to continue the puppetry program 
next semester. Although her grant from the 
Kansas Arts Council runs out in December, 
she said there may be enough local interest 
to keep the program going. 

Best and worst 



From Heaven To Hell: K State Players production, B 
pm tonight and Saturday. Purple Masque Theatre, East 
Stadium. 

U PC Art* and Craft Salt ; 10 a m to * p. m . toda y . KSU 

Ballrooms, K State Union. 

Jon I ml; tolksinger. UPC Cotteehouse presentation, > 
p.m. tonight and Saturday. Catskeller. VI 

J mi Wade Graduate Recital Series. 1 . 30 p.m. tonight. 
AIIFaiths Chapel. 

Carol Concert: KSU Concert Choir. Collegiate Chorale 
and the Rhapsody Ringers Bell Choir, 3 andB pm Sunday. 
AIIFaiths Chapel 



General Student Recital: 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. All Faiths 
Chapel. 

UPC Cotteehouse Nooner: featuring December Session, 
noon to I p m. Tuesday. Catskeller. 

Student Piano Recital: Carolyn Curls and Christina 
Whittle, 8 p.m. Wednesday, All Faiths Chapel 

A wards Recital : 3 : 30 p m T hursday. All Faiths Chapel. 



KSU Permanent Art Collection Exhibit: through Dec IS, 
K State Union Arl Gallery 

Bill Bracker exhibit: through Dec IS. Ambry Gallery, 
West Stadium. Bracker is head ol the K U Oept ot 
Ceramics. 

Twelfth Nlflht: Manhattan Civic Theatre production, 
6:10 p.m. dinner performance tonight, 8pm Saturday, 423 
Houston. 



Johnny Cash; 1 p.m. Saturday, Manhattan High Gym 
nasium, sponsored by the Manhattan Recreation Com 
mission. Tickets M SO, available at the Manhattan 
Recreation Commission until 1 p.m. Saturday, alter I p.m 
at the gym. 

The House By The Stable, a religious drama in verse by 
Charles Williams, and Christmas Concerto by Corelll: * 
p.m Sunday, St Paul's Episcopal Church, 6th and Poynti. 



The Gauntlet : starring Clinl Eastwood, U PC Feature 
Film, rated R, J and»:30 p.m Friday and Saturday, 
Forum Hall, II 21 

Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams ; starring Joanne 
Woodward, UPC Feature Film, J p.m. Sunday. 11. 

Pink Flamingos: UPC Kaleidoscope Film, Thursday, 
3 :30 p.m in the Little Theatre, 7 :» p.m. In Forum Hall, 
It IS. 



Violence and plot 
destroy 'Gauntlet' 



By SCOTT FARINA 
Review Editor 

Clint Eastwood's film "The Gauntlet" is a 
bit like Chinese food: an hour after you see 
it, you're hungry for an explanation of why 
you sat through the full screening. 

This is one of Eastwood's best and one of 
his worst movies. Worst is the plot, an 



in- 



Colle eian Review 



credible tale of police corruption that is a 
paranoiac's dream come true. Conspiracy? 
"The Parallax View" wasn't this obsessed 
with conspiracy ! 

In a nutshell (which is all the plot really 
is): Eastwood is Ben Shockley, a Phoenix 
metro cop on the skids due to alcohol. Police 
Commissioner Blakelock (William Prince) 
sends Shockley to Las Vegas to bring back 
"a nothing witness for a nothing trial." 

This piece-of-cake assignment, naturally, 
has complications. The witness is a hooker 
named Augustina Mally (Sondra Locke) and 



Original play intense, sensitive 



By BECCY TANNER 
Staff Writer 

There is no such thing as blood being 
thicker than water in "From Heaven to 
Hell," a play written by Cindy Helferstay, a 
former K-State student. For in the end, the 
blood ties of family just don't stand up to 
lust, greed and envy. 

"From Heaven to Hell" is an intense 
three-act play about two brothers, Will and 



Colle gian Review 



Amos Johnson, who are involved in a con- 
tinuous battle until the third act. 

Will, portrayed by Mark Pennington, 
junior in speech, is a playboy, concerned 
only -:oout Amos' money, women and booze. 
Pennington's performance as Will is out- 
standing, for he reflects well a sort of 
chauvinistic attitude held by men in the 



1930s, the time period of the play. 

Amos, the elder Johnson brother, played 
by Rod Russell, sophomore in journalism 
and mass communications, tries at times to 
maintain the family unity. But the sitution is 
tense, and the sibling rivalries often block 
any form of relationship. 

Russell is a sensitive actor, and his por- 
trayal of Amos as the backwoodsy brother is 
close to perfect . Amos does not like change, 
and any form of progress such as a light- 
bulb, a radio or an airplane upsets him. 

AND SO, when his brother brings elec- 
tricity and women to his cabin, all hell 
breaks loose. And come to think of it, that's 
what the play is all about. Because, you see, 
Amos believes he controls his father's land 
from heaven to hell and anyone trespassing 
either on land or air will be shot. He is a 
recluse, and is content to finish his life 
plowing his land and smoking his pipe. 



In the four-character drama, the two 
women, Marta and Elsie, play just as 
dominant a role as the men. Both are in- 
volved with the Salvation of Man 
organization in town and both are as equally 
opposite as the brothers. 

Marta, played by Teresa Haffener Frost, 
a graduate in speech, is a pious Christian 
woman who is concerned, at first, only about 
Amos' soul— then she decides she likes more 
than his soul. 

Elsie, played by Patty Wirtz, sophomore 
in speech, is more concerned with finding a 
rich man who will bring her flowers and will 
smell nice. 

For the most part, the acting is excellent; 
it is intense and sensitive. 

"From Heaven to Hell" is directed by 
Alana Windhorst and produced by the K- 
State Players. It will be performed tonight 
and Saturday at 8 p.m. in the Purple Masque 
Theatre. 



somebody wants her— and Shockley— dead. 
All this happens in the first 15 minutes. 
From there on the rest of the movie is about 
how Shockley gets his man— er, woman— to 
Phoenix, despite the best efforts of two 
police departments and The Mob. End of 
plot. 

IF YOU get off on guns, this movie should 
provide multiple orgasms. The combined 
armed forces of World War II used less 
ammunition than the makers of this film. 
Squads of well-armed cops level a house and 
make Swiss cheese out ot a car and a bus. 

There is also a motorcycle-helicopter 
chase in which the helicopter crashes into 
high-tension wires; a car blown to bits with 
an innocent man inside, Eastwood getting 
the crap beat out of him by some Hell's 
Angels types; and other mindless sadism. 

Now for the good stuff. This in one of 
Eastwood's best movies because he is 
chipping away the ice from his macho-man 
image. He knows some emotion and 
responds to other people; he is not com- 
pletely and totally successful. 

Oh sure, Eastwood's character wins in the 
end, but he is not the superhero of "Dirty 
Harry." He makes mistakes; his instincts 
are not always correct. 

AND SONDRA Locke is a big plus. She is a 
beautiful woman who, as Mally, manages to 
connect with Shockley's inner feelings. She 
is very much an essential ingredient in the 
story. Without her help, Shockley would not 
survive, and that is a switch in an Eastwood 
movie. 

Eastwood directed "The Gauntlet," and 
there is no denying his technical skill. This is 
a taut, suspenseful movie. There is rarely a 
dull moment, and the simplistic plot has 
enough good guy -bad guy overtones to get 
the audience to root for Shockley and Mally 
to make it to the end of their adventure. 

Finally, though, the violence is mindless 
and excessive, an artificial device to grab 
the audience. Surely, Eastwood is by now 
capable of providing the movie-goer a more 
lasting, satisfying concoction. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri., D*cemb«r 8, 1 978 



4 



CJE's latest 



Soloists highlight LP 



By SCOTT FARINA 
Review Editor 

At the risk of committing sacrilege: the 
new double-record set by the K-State 
Concert Jazz Ensemble <CJE> is in many 
ways a better presentation of the group than 
campus concerts. 

First, a recording enhances instruments 
that often get drowned out in person, 
especially percussion and piano, which 



Colle gian Review 



J 



come through well here. (Unfortunately, 
Randy Detrick's guitar wasn't boosted 
enough, and he gets lost amid the rest of the 
players.) 

Second, this collection has a wider variety 
of styles than I've heard in live concerts. 
The concerts are almost hyper in their 
energy, with little variation. On the album, 
there are ballads, vocals and mainstream 
jazz, as well as the band's usual churning 
modern sounds. 

Of the to songs on the album, only one is a 
loser: "I Believe in Love." Lisa Mon- 
tgomery's vocalizing just doesn't make it; 
she sounds out of breath and unsure if her 
posture should be sexy, removed or happy. 

The arrangement doesn't help. Peter 
Strohm, a fine keyboardist and composer, 
missed on this one. He removes all the hints 
of Latin rhythms that were in the original 
and turns the song into a straight, 
unadorned move. Much more could be done 
with this tune; here it lies flat. 

BUT THOSE are the only complaints. The 
rest of the album, recorded live at the 
Montreaux Jazz Festival last summer, 
features a high-caliber band, ready to show 
the jazz world what K-State can produce. 

Tim Schlieker's tuba solo on "Ain't Gonna 
Ask No More" is a pure joy to listen to, and 
the song itself is a ballsy, bluesy number— a 
real slow -cooker. 

Detrick gets a few solo turns, most 
notably on "Do Have At It," where his 
clean, economical lines fit perfectly. 

The CJE had several good trombonists 
last year, and two of the best, Pat Culley and 



John Burlingham, perform a dialog on 
"Bill's Burner." The two compliment each 
other well: Culley has a raspy, flippant 
sound, while Burlingham possesses sweet, 
pure tones. 

Long-time jazz freaks will enjoy the guest 
performance by legendary trumpeter Harry 
"Sweets" Edison on the tune "Goin' Easy." 
This is a mainstream tune with an easy feel, 
and Edison quotes from four or five other 
songs at the end. Listen carefully, and you 
should recognize them. 

THE HIGHLIGHT of the album is "You 
Are the Sunshine of My Life," with good 
work from a number of players, 

Vince Parrelte does the singing, and he is 
completely in control of his voice. He uses it 
as an instrument, playing with the melody 
while pay ing attention to the ly rica 1 content. 

The arrangement of this number is 
superb, wrapping the Stevie Wonder tune 
around the folk song "You Are My Sun- 
shine." Parrette sings this with the sensitive 
accompaniment of Burlingham and 
Detrick; and in the middle is one of Joe 
Graber's big, bad tenor solos. 

This is a good band with fine soloists and 
tight ensemble playing. Phil Hewett has 
done it again. 

The dual-record set sells for $9 and is 
available at the band office and at the K- 
State Union bookstore. 




ATTENTION 

To all the people who 

are interested in a job 

on a newspaper. 

Applications for 

Advertising Salesmen and 

Collegian Staff are available 

in Kedzie 103. Deadline 

to turn in applications is 

Wed., Dec. 13, 

at 5 : 00 p.m. 

(Applications are to be returned to 
Kedzie 103) 



JON IMS 



His musical style can best be described as a blend of 
Jim Croce, John Denver, Arfo Guthrie and Bob Dylan. The 
guitar provides bits' sole accompaniment lending its sometimes 
plucky, sometimes passionate voice to the concert A concert 
you don't want to miss! 




10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. FrJ, 0«»mb«r 8, 1 978 



Basketballers to try for 
win No. 5 on Saturday 



Jack Hartman's Wildcats (44) will host 
the Cal Poly-Pomona Broncos (0-3) in 
Ahearn Field House Saturday night. Tipoff 
is set for 7:35 with the jayvees scheduled to 
play Butler County Junior College at 5: 15. 

K-State defeated Cal Poly in their only 
previous meeting, 87-68 in 1976, 



Sports 



The Broncos return their entire front line 
from last season : 6-6 senior forward 
Broderick Hunter (11.8 points per game), 6- 
11 senior center Don Johnson (13,1) and 64 
senior forward Geoff Worley (7.9). Cleve 
Porter, a 6-5 senior forward, is expected to 
start in place of Worley. 

However, Cal Poly lost both starting 
guards. They will be replaced by ft-2 Jason 
Malinowski and 6-2 Carl Underwood. 

Cal Poly has yet to win a game this 
season, falling 73-52 to California, 89-75 to 
Stanford and 7642 to Chico State. 

Six-year coach Don Hogan led his team to 
a 14-12 mark and second place in the 
California Collegiate Athletic Association 
last season. 

THIS YEAR, the Broncos are averaging 
only 63 points a game on 38 percent field goal 
shooting. Plus, they've been outrebounded 
in two of their first three contests. 

"I know they (Cal Poly) have good size 
and experience on the front line," Hartman 
said. "And our lack of height could make 
that a problem." 

K-State has enjoyed its best balanced 



scoring in several season, with all five 
starters averaging over nine points a game. 
Sophomore guard Rolando Blackmail leads 
the 'Cats with a 15.8 average. Freshman 
forward Ed Nealy is next with 14.6 points 
per game. Juco transfer Glenn Marshall has 
chipped in 11.4 with Tyrone Adams and Jari 
Wills each adding 9.8 per game. Senior 
center Steve Soldner rounds out the scoring 
with 9.2 points per contest. 

Soldner also leads the team in rebounding 
with nine per game. He is followed by Nealy 
with 8.2 and Jari Wills with 7.8. 

Blackman has also been impressive on 
defense. He held SMU's Phil Hale to eight 
points and held Minnesota 's Leo Rautins to 
for 4 shooting in the first half. He then 
switched to James Jackson in the second 
half and held him scoreless, also. 

HARTMAN HAS USED his bench 
sparingly in the last two games with only 
Adams spelling the starting five. 

"1 don't start the game with any idea of 
how many people will play," Hartman said. 
"It all depends on the situation." 

Junior guard Fred Barton, who has been 
sidelined with a pulled back muscle, 
returned to practice early in the week and 
may be available Saturday. 

"The doctors recommended we let Fred 
play and see how he comes along. He's made 
progress but we'll have to wait and see if he 
can play Saturday," Hartman said. 

"Our victory over Minnesota was a 
tremendous win. We played a heckuva 
second half in all aspects.. offensively, 
defensively, rebounding, everything. Now, 
we need to remember how we did 
everything and do it for a full game." 



K-Staters to see bowl action 



Three K-State football seniors have been 
chosen as Big 8 senior all-stars to play in the 
second annual Olympia Challenge Bowl, 
Jan. 13 in Seattle, Wash. 

The game will be played in Seattle's 
Kingdome. Possible television and radio 
coverage is yet to be announced. 

William Fisher, Chester Jeffery and 
Charlie Green will join the Big 8 seniors to 
play the Pac-10 senior all -stars. 

Fisher, a 6-2, 215-pound inside linebacker 
from Washington, DC, led the Big 8 in 
tackles with 151, but has been chosen to play 
in his former position at defensive back in 
the Olympia Challenge Bowl. 

Jeffery, a 64, 260-pound defensive tackle 
from Kenosha, Wis., will play that position 
for the all-star team. He made 76 tackles, 
including four sacks, this season playing for 
the Wildcats. 



Green was the first wide receiver chosen. 
The 5-10, 172-pound wide receiver from 
Omaha, Neb., has been the Big 8's leading 
receiver for the past two years. He was an 
all-Big 8 selection this year catching 39 
passes for 616 yards. 

Coaching the team will be Bud Wilkinson 
and his St. Louis Cardinal football staff. 
Coaching the Pac-10 all-star team will be 
John McKay and his football staff from the 
Tampa Bay Buccaneers. 

"Several of the players we've invited to 
the Oly Bowl II have opportunity to play in 
other bowl games," Otis Cross, executive 
director for the game, said. "But they're 
coming to the Kingdome to play because 
they're excellent pro draft prospects and the 
Oly Bowl will be heavily scouted by the 
pros." 




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from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

By HORTICULTURE CLUB 

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multiples of 5 lb, bags only 

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Coupon good Sunday 12/ 10 until 5:00pm * 



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4J9Poyn)l 

Phone Ahead 
77* UV 



* 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Frl., D«emb«r 8, 1 978 



11 



* What a surprise for KU- 
Hadlto stay as coach 






LAWRENCE ( AP »— In an expected move, 
University of Kansas alumnus John Had], 
an all-America choice in his college days, 
was named offensive coordinator for the 
Jayhawk football program Thursday. 

Had! was the first assistant chosen by his 
longtime friend, Don Fambrough, himself 
selected as head coach Tuesday. 

Had], a Lawrence native, served as 
quarterback coach under Bud Moore, who 
was fired last month, and was once con- 
sidered a top prospect for the head coaching 
job. 

"I can't begin to explain how pleased 1 am 
that John is joining my staff," Fambrough 
said. "He has so much to offer, both as a 
coach and as a recruiter. Like me, Kansas is 
his first love. He is totally dedicated to 
building the best possible program." 

Hadl, 38, was an all -America halfback for 
the Jayhawks in 1960 before switching to 
quarterback his senior year and winning 
national honors at that position in 1961. He 
was a three-time all-Big 8 selection and in 
1961 guided Kansas to a 33-7 victory over 
Rice in the Bluebonnet Bowl. 

He is one of only two players to have his 

Kansas downs 
Oral Roberts 

LAWRENCE ( AP ) -Freshman forward 
Tony Guy scored 19 points to power the fifth- 
ranked Kansas Jayhawks past Oral 
Roberts, 90-77, in an intersect iona I college 
basketball game Thursday night 

At one point during the second half, Guy 
sank five straight baskets to spark a Kansas 
rally after the Titans briefly grabbed the 
lead after trailing at halflime. 

The Jayhawks grabbed a 17-point lead, the 
biggest ul the game, with 3: 19 left on a three 
point play from sophomore forward Johnny 
Crawford and Kansas coasted to the victory. 

Calvin Garrett, a 6-6 forward, led the 
Titans with a game-high 26 points. 

Sophomore guard Darnell Valentine 
scored 13 and Paul Mokeski, a 7-1 center, 
added 12 to round out Kansas players 
scoring in double figures. Crawford, who 
scored 23 points, kept the game close 
through the first half, but the Titans, led by 
Garrett, grabbed the lead twice in the first 
half, once at 16:53 on a bucket by center 
Carleton Hurdle and at the 12:05 mark on a 
basket by Garrett. 

The Titans stretched the lead to eight 
points with 1(1:07 left in the half on a basket 
by guard Lamont Reid, but the Jayhawks 
rallied to tie the game 25-25 on a free throw 
by Valentine. 



jersey number permanently retired at KU. 
Kansas City businessman Ray Evans is the 
other. 

A 16-year professional football career 
included stops for Hadl at San Diego, Los 
Angeles, Green Bay and Houston. 

He retired ranking as the third leading 
passer in National Football League history 
for both most yards gained and most passes 
attempted. He ranks fourth in career touch- 
down passes. 

In 1971 he was named professional foot- 
ball's man of the year, an award given 
annually to the player most involved with 
projects which benefit the community and 
mankind in general. 

"The opportunity to work under Don 
Fambrough is one I wouldn't pass up," Hadl 
said. "He is not only a great football coach, 
but also a terrific person. He*s dedicated to 
putting Kansas football at a winning level 
and I'm honored that he has asked me to be 
part of it." 

Devaney main speaker 
at football banquet 

Une of the most successful coaches in the 
history of American football, Bob Devaney, 
will speak at K-State"s football banquet in 
the Union Ballroom Monday night 

After 11 straight successful seasons from 
1962 to 1972 as the head coach at Nebraska, 
Devaney remained as the Cornhuskers' 
athletic director. He was the kickoff speaker 
for the Manhattan United Way campaign in 
1977. 

Few coaches achieve the ac- 
complishments Devaney did while head 
coach at Nebraska. Based on his percentage 
of victories, Devaney was the "winningest 
coach in the nation" for most of his Husker 
coaching career. 

He wound up with three straight Orange 
Bowl wins to accompany his record of nine 
bowl trips in 11 years, eight Big 8 titles, two 
national championships < 1970 and 1971 ) and 
numerous Coach of the Year and similar 
honors. 

A native of Saginaw, Mich., Devaney 
never had a losing season at Nebraska, 
winning 101 games, losing 20 and tying two 
in 11 years. His record at Wyoming (where 
he coached before going to Nebraska) was 
35-10-5. 

K-State's football banquet is sponsored by 
the Sports Committee of the Manhattan 
Chamber of Commerce. Tickets may be 
purchased at the Chamber of Commerce 
office or from the K-State Athletic Ticket 
Office. 



ELECTRONICS TRUCK LOAD 

SALE 

by 

Manhattan Auto Sound 

Dec. 9 & 10 10-6 p.m. 

at 

FLINT HILLS TOYOTA 

2816 Amherst Ave. 



I 



Turntables- Receivers 

Speakers-Tape Decks 

Car Stereos-TVs 

Video Recorders 



ALL BRAND NAME EQUIPMENT 



CONGRATULATIONS 

Stewert and Peggy Hartwell 




Little StewyTwoey 

Like father, like son? < We hope not! > 
From the Class of '80! 




Hot & Glazed Donuts 
Come out at 10:00 



i 



When you get hungry for good, hot, homemade 

donuts, you don't have to go home to Mother, 

Come Home to Vein's! 



10 Gal. Woodtone Aquarium with Glass tk 
f Top and Incandescent Strip Light M4* 5 4 



)> Top 

I 



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■ 

5 

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Metaframe 24" Flourescent Hobbist 
Hinged Hood SALE M7 W Reg. '24* 

Metaframe Dynaflo Power Filter 
M2* 



Natural Gravel 
M2* 

WEEKEND FISH SPECIALS 

Sunset Variatus 2/1.00 

Black Tetra 2/1.00 

Kissers 2/1.00 

Moonlight Gourami 2/1.00 

Zebra Angels 2/1.00 



We have a large selection 

of artificial and cut Christmas trees. 

And also come in and see our selection 

of Christmas decorations. 



GREEN THUMB 





/ 



\ 



1105 Waters 

M on. -Sal. 8-5: .Ui 



'Across from 
ALCO" 



539-4751 
Sun. Noon-5:30 



/ 




12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri„ December*, 1W» 



1 



•i 






(i 



v 



Business college wants international studies 



By KAREN CARLSON 
Collegian Reporter 

The need for an international business 
program at K-State to provide training for 
business majors, and possibly aid Kansas 
businessmen involved in international trade 
has been recognized by the College of 
Business Administration and a group of 
state businessmen. 

According to Ray Coleman, professor of 
business administration, members of the 
International Trade Council (ITC) and the 
business college eventually want a strong 
curriculum in international trade. The 
program would provide overseas work for 
K-State students, and a work program for 
foreign students at K-State. 

The institution also will provide Kansas 
firms, involved in importing and exporting, 
advice on current problems in dealing with 
foreign markets. 

"The institute will provide the resources, 
initiative and coordination neccessary to 
translate research into formats that will 
serve Kansas business interest," Coleman 
said. "Faculty will also be available to 
consult with business firms on international 
trade problems." 

Current barriers facing Kansas include 
foreign governments which subsidize their 
industries to keep prices down. Tax rules 
also hamper Kansas firms, and often firms 
that are new to the export market fail 
because they are not familiar with the 
common pitfalls of the business, Coleman 
said. 

TO HELP to provide funds for the in- 
ternational business program, the ITC, now 
consisting of 21 Kansas businessmen, was 
formed in 1976. 



Coleman said in order to become a council 
member a prospective member must pledge 
a minimum of $15,000 for ITC support. 

"Our goal is 100 members, or an en- 
dowment of $1 million for the International 
Trade Council. The money will be used to 
enhance educational opportunities offered 
through K-State and its College of Business 
Administration," he said. 

Recently, the Kansas Department of 
Economic Development found it necessary 
to award a sizable contract to Georgia State 
University to provide information on the 
import and export situation in Kansas, 
Coleman said. 

"Since there is no academic institution 
available here to seek out that information, 
it was sought elsewhere," Coleman said. 

The Georgia study showed that from 1972 
to 1976 Kansas has dropped from 19th to 21st 
in export volume of manufactured goods 
among the 50 states. 

Money from the endowment fund also will 
provide support for the International 
Student Center, bring in international 
lecturers, and fund professorships at K- 
State in international finance, marketing, 
management and taxation, Coleman said. 

STUDENTS NOW must look to 
educational institutions outside of Kansas if 
they are to get a quality education in in- 
ternational business, Coleman said. 

"Students are excited about getting a 
strong program started here, but the main 
thing is that they are interested," he said. 

"President Acker endorses our in- 
ternational activity and we (the College of 
Business Administration) are enthused 
about getting a program started," Coleman 
said. 



McLain:'moneytobemade' 
in foreign construction jobs 



By KELLY SWOFFORD 
Collegian Reporter 

Jim McLain, manager of business 
development and planning in the in- 
ternational division of Blount Brothers Co., 
was in Manhattan Thursday to speak with 
students in construction science. 

His visit was arranged by the Associated 
General Contractors Student Chapter, said 
Casey Halsey, chapter president. 

McLain attended several morning classes 
and was the speaker at this month's 
seminar. 

"The seminars, which bring in experts 
from the construction field, are an attempt 
to give students insights into the type of jobs 
availalble and the problems found in the 
real world," Halsey said. 

McLain presented a slide show of scenes 
from Saudi Arabia and the work done there 
by the Blount company. 

His remarks dealt primarily with Saudi 
Arabia, where his company is planning to 
build a university contracted at $3.4 billion. 



"The Saudis are building major cities 
where there was nothing but desert before," 
he said. "There is money to be made in the 
international market." 

McLain explained that American workers 
in foreign countries can make money 
because there is very little after-hours 
diversion— so they work long hours. There is 
also very little on which to spend the money 
earned, he said, 

Discussing differences between foreign 
and domestic business, McLain said people 
do things much differently abroad. 

"Their bureaucracy is different, so you 
have to be prepared to make adjustments to 
get along with the people," he said. 

McLain said ihe English language is the 
language of business. Americans can get by 
in international business without the 
knowledge of other languages, he said. 

McLain also spoke before the Tri-V alley 
Chapter of the Kansas Engineering Society 
Thursday night at the Manhattan Country 
Club. 




Eleven 
extraordinary 
men have earned 
the world's most 

prestigious 

award. 



An exclusive broadcast 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12, ON MOST 

PUBLIC TELEVISION STATIONS 



Made possible by a grant from 



* 



Rockwell International 



(Check your local listings) 



The ITC just signed its first international 
member, GonzaloGutierrez-Uribe.a 1961 In- 
state graduate. 

Gutierrez-Uribe heads an import and 
export management firm handling textiles 
and industrial products with headquarters 
in Barcelona, Spain. 



Gutierrez-Uribe said he contributed to the 
fund "because it has already been valuable 
lo me and my business interests. One of the 
leads suggested by ITC proved very fruitful 
this past week when 1 concluded a deal with 
the New Image of Galena (a subsidiary of 
Hix Automation of Pittsburg) for heat 
transfer machinery and transfer papers." 



WATCH FOR THE NEW 

Hatrieej 

3116 Anderson 



trapshoot 

Tuttle Creek 
Trap Park 




December 9 
10 a.m. 

Association of 

College Unions- International 

Qualifying Tournament 

For more information contact 
the K-State Union Recreation Area 

532 6562 

k^tateuriori 



REMINDER 

Holy Day Today 

Masses at ST. ISIDORE'S 

12:10-4:00-5:30 

Also- Mass at Danforth 

11:30 a. m. Friday 



MISSISSffS 

THE LUNCHEON SPECIAL 

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i\ 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri., Dec«mtwr 8, 1 978 



a 



• 



t 



Two take lives 
in tragic 'solution' 

RIDGEWOOD, N.J. (AF>— Two high 
school classmates— one affable and 
outgoing, the other an introvert— found a 
common solution to their problems: they 
hanged themselves within four days of each 
other. 

Hours after Jeffrey Hunter was buried 
Wednesday, Christoper Mathieson was 
found dead at his home. Both were 16. 

The tragedy began Sunday, when Hun- 
ter's family found him hanging from a piece 
of nylon clothesline in his attic bedroom. 
The boy left no note of explanation. 

Officials at Ridgewood High School in this 
affluent New York City suburb called 
Hunter, a member of the junior varsity 
baseball team, "a leader." One friend said 
Hunter "loved to make people laugh. 
Nobody thought he had any problems." 

But Phil Ross, another friend, said: 
"There was a whole mess of things 
bothering him. A mess of things hit him and 
just cut him down. " 

Friends say Hunter, who had worked at a 
highway gas station, fractured his boss' jaw 
in a fight over pay and working conditions. 
Police said no charges had been filed. 

Mathieson did not go to Paramus for 
Hunter's funeral, but discussed the death 
with friends. 

"We were talking about how terrible it 
was, about why he did it," said Peter Sink- 
way. Mathieson, described by others as 
quiet and shy, did not seem depressed, said 
Sinkway. 

Abruptly, "he got up and said he had to go 
do something," Sinkway said. "He got on his 
moped and went home. We were worried 

Sinkway said he and a friend went to 
Mathieson's house, where they found him 
hanging. Police did not release other details 
of his death. 

McCain to stay 
for Carlin reign 

TOPEKA (AP>— James McCain, former 
K-State president and current secretary of 
the Department of Human Resources, has 
agreed to stay on in his cabinet-level post, 
Gov. -elect John Carlin announced Thur- 
sday. 

McCain, who will be 71 on Friday, has 
been secretary of the department since 1976 
when he was appointed to that job by 
Republican Gov. Robert Bennett. McCain 
was president of K-State for 25 years prior to 
that. 

"His administration of the Department of 
Human Resources has promoted the 
stability and growth of the Kansas work 
force and the Kansas economy," Carlin, a 
Democrat, said. "He has proven his ability 
to work effectively with leaders of both 
labor and industry." 

In explaining why he decided to stay on in 
the new Democratic administration, 
McCain said he simply had too much work 
left and wanted to stay on to complete the 
job. 

McCain cited current efforts to find 
solutions for labor shortages, which he said 
is a greater problem presently in Kansas 
than unemployment. 

"I was gratified that Gov. -elect Carlin 
gave me the opportunity to continue in this 
job," McCain said. 





Buy-Back 



Here 
are some 
answers to 
often asked questions 







Question: 
Answer: 



Question: 
Answer: 



How does the Union Bookstore determine how much your 
books are worth when you sell them back? 

If the Bookstore has notification from the instructor that the 
books are to be re-adopted tor use the next semester, and if the 
Bookstore does not already have a sufficient stock on hand, then 
you will be offered 60 per cent of the publisher's current list price. 

For example: if a book sells for $10.00 new and it meets the 
requirements noted above, the book would be bought from you for 
$6.00. 

If the Bookstore has not received notice that the book will be 
used again, or if it already has a sufficient stock on hand, the book 
would be worth the current wholesale price as indicated by one of 
the nation's largest jobbers of used textbooks. 

If you have any questions about the price being paid for a text- 
book, the buyer will be happy to answer any questions which you 
may have regarding the price paid. 

1 5 60 per cent the usual price paid 
for textbooks around the country? 

Definitely not. Most stores in the United States pay only 50 per 
cent for books being used again. The Union Bookstore is one of the 
few stores which pays 60 per cent. And remember, we pay cash. You 
don't have to take your money out in trade. 



Question: 
Answer: 



What about paperbacks? Does the 
60 per cent policy apply to them too? 

Yes. The Union Bookstore does not penalize you on paper- 
backs. If they are being used again, and if the bookstore needs 
them, you will receive 60 per cent of the publisher's list price. 



Question: 
Answer: 



If the publisher's price has gone up since I bought my books, 
will I receive the benefit of that price Increase? 

Yes. For instance, if you bought your book for $9.00 and the 
publisher's list price Is now $10.00, you will get $6.00, not $5.40. 



We will buy books: 




Monday, Dec. 11 

thru 

Friday, Dec. 15 
Saturday, Dec. 16 

Monday, Dec. 18 

thru 

Friday, Dec. 22 

k-state union 

bookstore 



8:15 a.m. 

to 
4:45 p.m. 

10:00 a.m. 
to 

4:00 p.m. 

8:15 a.m. 
to 

4:45 p.m. 



0301 



14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fri., D«c»>mb-r8\ 1B78 



Collegian 
Classifieds 

Daspley CleaaMled AaMe 

- °" , J??'' ** re "* loch ' ""•* d*** **.60 P* "i«h; Ry* 
«y»: I3.S0 par inch; Tan day*: «2.«© per Inch. (Deadline la S 
p.m. 2 dan bafora publication .1 



SUBLEASE 

SECOND SEMESTER. Large, partly fumlshad two bedroom 
Iwuaa, ona half block from campua and Aggiaviiie 
Available Jan 1 si, J18S, Rick c* Wade 776*106 <*8-7t) 

WO TWO room apart man) (or only 175 month. Ona half block 
from campua. All ulllltlaa Includad, now to May 31, 1979. 
Call Denial. 5324654, 5374144. (70-79 

TWO BEDROOM Irallar. furnished Available January IsL 
1130 Call 539-31 49 (71 75) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

FEMALES TO than wcaptlonal houaa at KSU. fuml*h*d, 
private bedroom*, 165 and up, waahar and dryar. no pat*. 
at MN 11th. 5394401. 157-00) 

MALE TO ahara larga houta ona block from KSU. Private 
bedroom, lumlahad 170 at 1 108 Bluemont. 8304401. [66 
«> 

TWO FEMALES (or tprlng aamaatar to ahara larga (our 
badroom houta. Private room* (or 166 plua ona sixth 

ulllltlaa. Can 537-0904. 07 71) 

NEEDED: TWO roommates tor nail aamaatar. Pata aiiowad. 
Cheap and cloaa to campui. Call 776-3570, (6770) 

FEMALES TO than) larga lumlahad apartment Walk to cam. 
pua, 175 month Utilities paid. 539-2663 (87 78) 

LIBERAL MALE lo share nice, completely furnished apart- 
mant (or spring semester 190 month plua ona thin] 
ulllltlaa. Call Don 776*071. ((7-71) 

COZVI COMFYi Private lumlahad room In larga old 
houaa— two baths, kllchan, waahar ft dryar, disposal, 
mlcrowava ovan, claanlng woman. Mala or female 21 years 
or older Can move In now— rant slarts January 1. 1100 
plua utilities. Samara 7754WOS, (89-78) 

SHARE TWO badroom apartment In quiet, wooded are*. 
Fireplace Your half- *1 50, utilities Includad 776-7298 and 
77*7181. (6*73) 

TWO FEMALE roommates Luxury apartment. Fireplace, 
dishwasher. Call 778-0057 alter 5m (09-71) 



MALE TO ahare one badroom tumlahad apartment (or 
eecond aama a tar. laundry facilities, swimming pool, air 
conditioning, transportation lo campus. t94/month plus 
IS ulllltlaa. 539-5932. kaap trying. (89-73) 

FEMALE WANTED to than comty Wildcat Inn apartment on 
Cleflln, call Pam 7764400. (69-71) 

ONE OR two to ahara two badroom apartmant at Wildcat 
Creak with two males (or spring semester 778-0043. (69-73) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE; prater upperclaat person. Two 
badroom houta, laundry facllltlea. Call this week or 
weekend, 7764796 (69-71) 

MALE ROOMMATE (or spring aamaatar. Own bedroom. Car 
paling and dishwasher. Two blocks to campus. Call Stave. 
7764183. (70-74) 

ONE OR two roommates (Or second semester Large tour 
badroom houta with laundry. Moderate habits required 
100 par month 539-7306. (70-74) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted lo snare larga two badroom 

apartment. Furnished, fully carpeted and draped Laundry 
tacilltie*, dishwasher, fireplace, private parking, pool and 
much mora. Call 5394004. (70-74) 

KANSAS CITY. Female lo share vary nlct two badroom. 
almost completely furnished apartment In 
"M lea ton"— Kan aas City, KS. Convenient local ton right of! 
I4S, clote to Plaza, and Weatport. 1150 a month, plua half 
0( utilities Great opportunity for parson going on block or 
graduating In December Call (913) 3624905 (70-70) 

FEMALE TO share Ihree badroom houaa, waahar, dryar. Call 
alter 6:00 p.m.. 5374447 or day! I me 539-7508 Ask for Jean- 
ny. (70-74) 

JANUARY FIRST, female to share two badroom furnished 
apartment two blocks from KSU. 967 month plua elec- 
tricity Call 537 4292 (70-74) 

MALE. SHARE one third costs Apartmant one hall block 
from campus 100 par month. 776-1030.(71-72) 

LIBERAL FEMALE; prefer upperclaaa person Share two 
bedroom houta, ona halt block from Wast Stadium ISO 
plus one third utilities Call 537 2945 . (71-75) 

n ON smoking female to share one badroom nicely fur 
nlahed apartmenl alartlng 1st of January 162.50 month 
plua ona hall utllltlea. Call 776-3502 after 5:00 p.m. Work 
7704051 .(71-75) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester to ahara two badroom fur 
niahad trailer. 575 a month plus one half utilities. 5393149. 
(71-751 



WANTED 

CHRISTIAN ROOMMATE tor tprlng term. Call 539-1513 ask 
lor John. (00-72) 



THREE TICKETS lor Cai Poly- 
bar 9 Call 776-1247. (69-71) 



Pomona B Ball game Decern 



RIDER WANTED, leaving for S.E.U.S. (Florida) Wednesday 
Ihe 20th. to share expense*. Call 532-4560, ask for Lannle. 
(70-72) 

I NEED help stringing my guitar The new strings have no 
metal beset Please call Jennie at 332-5285 (7 1-72) 



LOST 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS SH51 A calculator It found conlacl 
Scotl al 537- 7200, evenings (70 72) 

DARK BLUE backpack with 3 notebooks and eye glasses. 
125 reward Call 532-3500. (71-72) 

MAN'S SEIKO watch with tlop wslch. In locker room In gym. 
Call 770- 7235. (71 75) 

SET OF keys, on Den is on Ave. between Fair child and An 
demon Avenues. Leal her disc fob reads Ton Ills Flats. Call 
5374293 attar 3:30 or before 1040 a.m. (71-74) 



FOUND 

FEMALE GERMAN Shepherd pup 12 week, old, al Manhat- 
tan and Thurston Ave. Pleaee contact Animal Shelter 
before Dec 11. (67 71) 

BLACK GLOVES near clock by Oenison Hall. To claim call 
537-7181. (71-73) 

THREE RESERVED student B-ball tickets. To claim and iden- 
tify, call 539-461 1 rm 208 Putnam. (71) 



FREE 

PUPPIES: FREE lo good homes German Shepherd- 
Dobberman cross Call John, 776-1250 or Joel, 7764077 
(70-72) 



PERSONAL 



SENIORS-DON'T torgel Friday's big TGIF party at Dark 
Horse Tavern. Dec 8. t :00 pm 4:00pm. (67 71) 

TRI DELTS-st retreat thlngt go bang in the middle of the 
night A bunch of Wild and Crazy guys. (71) 

NIGHT MARAUDER donut delivery service: There's no bout 
adoubt it, I'm ready for some "wild game" Saturday night) 
Hope you 20th la the best Love Irom the California Lady. 
(71) 

CHIPLETT. GREG and Stan— Gal ready tor a wild and crazy 
lima before, during and after the Ford Christmas party with 
your wild and crazy womenl Love your "Laugh-A-Lot 
Astronaut ", your "Monkey", and your "Vetlo-Be". (71) 



downatowen 

f pynior Mr 1 



excuse: me, 

DEAR BOY. I JUST 
CA ME TO TUCK 
CHESTER IN. 



by Tim Downs 

r 




GOODNIGHT! 
EEPTlCHnDONT 

LET THE BEDBUGS 
BITE! 



^ 













•4 


/AND/?*© ^ 

r LTrTLE PIGGY 

. WENT... ^ 


JZ 






*. 







^Sfyfy Y 





PEANUTS 



by Charles Shultz 



IN CHAPTER FIVE Mf 
BOOK REALLY 6ET5 60ING 




0EETHOVEN ANP fMl.,5 
6E0K6E ARE HAVING 
PINNER TOGETHER, ANR. 





iT'5 NOT 6£0&£ PHYLLIS, 

I5IT?THATU)0ULP 

SPOIL THE WHOLE 5TCW 




Crossword By Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 
1 Cleopatra's 

nemesis 
4 Mirth 
8 Implored 

12 Stag's mate 

13 Charge 
against 
property 

14 Prefix with 
dynamics 

15 Baseball 
area 

17 Follow 
IS Sea birds 

19 Kennedy or 
Merman 

20 Editorial 
mark 

22 Dove's 
milieu 

24 Amaryllis' 
cousin 

25 Protests 

29 Greek 
consonant 

30 Perfume 
ingredient 

31 Hway. 

32 Colonizers 

34 Entrance 

35 Lenient 
30 Ban- 
dye 



37 Fisherman's 
hangout 

40 Views 

41 Type of 
trigger 

42 Fares 

46 Inner: 
comb, 
form 

47 Eager 

48 Neighbor 
of Can. 

49 Belgian 
river 

50 Flower 
plots 

51 Denary 
DOWN 

1 Commotion 
Average solution 



2 Ancient 
French coin 

3 Fade 

4 Flash 

5 Pinocchio's 
downfall 

Slippery 
character 

7 Complete 

8 Padding 
sound 

9 Sister of 
Rachel 

10 Famed 
canal 

11 Toy 

16 liberate 
19 Catchalls, 
for short 
time: 25 min. 



BM3M MSJH ;4»JI*lffl 



HEMS F99H WSim 



EMM HtIO i^HMH 


SuU 


| 


1 
D 


U II 


NISIEITI 


HOT 


3n 


1 


II 


sfe 




mm 


iiaas 


ARE 


AMCIUfEl 


sllOILO 



MiWHra HHH Mdfslffl 



' l»=fofo 



IS1EENI 
12-8 
Answer to yesterday's puzzle. 



20 Persian 
and tabby 

21 Wings 

22 Indian 
spice 

23 Skinner, of 
the theater 

25 Valuable 
minerals 

20 Resolves, as 
an issue 

27 Type of 
jacket 

28 Antitoxins 
30 Norwegian 

saint 

33 Fear 

34 Sandra and 
Ruby 

30 Pays 
attention 

37 Miss 
Muffet's 
fare 

38 Brinker of 
fiction 

39 Assistant 

40 Slide on ice 

42 Fairy queen 

43 Relative 
of st. 

44 Employ 

45 Prepare 
hides 




CRYFTOQUIP 12-8 

LBEBUGTGHL LBTWSZ HUXLL WSDESU- 

X DSZ WL 

Yesterday's Cryptoqulp — SILLY INFORMALITY IS 
DECRIED AT FORMAL DANCES. 

Today'! Cryptoqulp cine: E equals P 



CHRISTIAN— HAPPY Anniversary Us bean the greatest 
three months. Everything — your dinner*, ooatrirje In K.C., 
running, formal*, Aggie Station, the farm, gym, rose*, ' * 
fishing, perppermlnt schnapps, looking for pencils end all m ' 
the quiet moment*. I love you. Rene (71) 

WHEELS-OTHERWISE known as the Shah. Looking for 
ward to tonight. Let'* gat crazy— HokI. (71) 

SAE PLEDGES lira up for a wild and crazy tunc lion, w* can 
hardly wall, the "Sneaky" AZ0 pledges. (71) 

DAVE. HAPPY 21st birthday two day* early Love Michelle 
Pit 

TO KRISTEN, P.B.F.O., KlriafcM, Grlf Chi O, Chl-O; It's Oft to 
formal wa go; You picked a Pike: to our delight; Chl-O. Chi- 
Of From Stone. Radford, Elf, Smash (ad). (71) 

MEGAN PATTERSON, Happy 18th birthday Wa would have 
gotten you * 14 Inch but It didn't coma that big. Remem 
bar, It's not the size that counts I Have a K -good tine bir- 
thday. Kaap on treading, nocllwlhcobbgbkdmg. (71) 

BABYCAKES, THE note* are great. Just Ilk* you I like the 
one In I ha underwear boat I'm still looking forth* last on*. 
This I* coaling me 5a a word from word "for " Hope you 
Ilka It. Love. Nerd (71) 

JAN AN C For now you're an orphan. Isn't It sad But on Sun- 
day the tenth you'll meat your new dad. Love, your "Pike" 
pledge dad (71) 

SUSAN J: Christmas Is coming, your birthday Is near. Your 
Pat* pledge dad Is s Junior this year. See you Dae. 10. Your 
Dad. (7t) 

KAYE-RAYE: I hope you have a greal time this weekend I 
Your dot. Lynn-bob. (71) 

KELLY SHEA! Have a nice day. Love, your Secret Santa. (71) 

LEANN B. Come Dec. 10, that night you will sea your Plka 
pledge dad who can he be (71) 

FARM HOUSE men: looking for B.F. rat? You won't tlnd him 

where he Is hiding (71) 

S FLOOR brother*. Thank* for all the laughs and fun with our 
trees Loveya Greg and Jess Your LI'I sisters (71) 



FOR SALE 



MANHATTAN USED Furniture, 
brows*. 778*1 12(3-75) 



317 S. 4th. Come In and 



WE SELL Maranlz and Phillips. Tech Electronic Warehouse, 
across from Vista Drive Inn on Tuttla Creek Blvd. (2311) 

MOSSMAN GUITARS-due to factory shut down I have tor a 
short time some vary nice acoustic steel-string guitars at 
las* than half original price. Call after 5:00 p.m. 316 221 
2825 or 221-3988, Wmtleld. KS. (5271) 

COINS MAKE excellent gifts. Complete selection U.S. and 
Foreign. Blrthyearand anniversary sets available Treasure 
Chest, Old Town Malf-Aoglavllle. (65-76) 

CHESS SETS, hand carved, wooden and onyx. Also Chess 
tables and backgammon sets. Idaal Christmas gifts. 
Treasure Cheat. Aggiaviiie, (66-76) 

ANTIQUE JEWELRY and watches, nice selection of Ihe 
classic old styles for Christmas. Old Town Mall and 
Aoglavllbj (65-74) 

OAK ROCKER, oak swivel desk chair, oak library labia, hall 
tree, oak dresser, pie cupboard and chest. 776-9705 altar 
5:00 p.m (87-71) 

MUST SELL 1972 mobile home 12x70, with patio and Shad. 
Call $39-1830 after 5 00 p.m. or anytime on weekend*. (67 
") 

1977 BELLA Vista trailer house, two badroom, furnished, 
skirted, shad. Just like naw and In excellent location. 537- 
9503.(87-71) 

MOBILE HOME, 12x60. two badroom. lots of living space, 
built in dressers, skirted and tied down. Nice lol. 537-7198. 
(87-71) 



Pecans 

FOR SALE DEC. 7&8 

At Upper Research 

Greenhouse directly 

north of Dickens Hall 

from7:30a.m. to 

5:30 p.m. 

By Horticulture 
Club 

All pre-cracked-in 
multiples of 5 lb. bags 

only$1.30/lb. 

HEATH H-8 microcomputer with 4K memory Complete with 
software and documentation. Will build complete system 
al a reasonable cost 53*5956 (66 72) 

14 x 70 WINDSOR, two bedroom excellent condition. Good 
investment, low monthly payments, fenced yard, stereo, 
DW, GO, central air. large shed. Located near Tuttle Creek 
Available Jan. 1st 537-9132 (68-71) 

NEW 14 WIDE HOMES 
AS LOW AS $8,850! 

Payments Less Than Rent 

Used Homes For Sale 
Homes For Rent 

WOODY'S MOBILE 
HOME SALES 

2044 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 

Manhattan, Kansas 66502 

913-539-5621 

Approved FHA-VA Financing 



CHANNEL MASTER AM/FM. FMM PX, 8-traCk record and 4 
speaker* US. Call 776-6794. (70-71) 

SNOW SKIS I Oynaster model 530. red and white, 200 cm 
Gaza to* heal bindings, straps, good condition, J75 Tom 
537-8764 (70-72) 



(Continued on page 15) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fit, D*c*mb*r8, W8 



IS 



(ContlnuwJ from pan* 1 4) 

"» TEXAS INSTRUMENTS Tl 57 programmable calculator, *45 
Tl 25 scientific calculator 125. TI-59 software: Statistics, 
electronic engineer Inn, securities end printer utility 539 
5958 (68 72) 

SONY NR 115 profession*! Dolby noise reduction adapter 
On* year warranty Calibration tapes are Included tot 
casssette and reel-to reel recorders 539 5958 168-72) 

ONE MINI GYM quadrlcep and hamstring leg machine Ex 
eel Ian I Christmas present lor an athlete 779-1054. 168-71) 

WHITE CHEST ot drawers wth matching desk, lull au>t ma I 
trees and box springs, Iron rod aquarium aland. All in good 
condition. Price negotiable. 7764622. (69-73) 

1975 CHEVY Monza 2 plus 2. V-8. Automatic, power steering, 
air conditioning, one owner 5390345 afternoon and 
evenings. (99-73) 

METALLIC BLUE 4-door Chevy Matlbu, 57,000 miles, radio, 
air, 8 track. V8, fantastic condition, 1965. negotiable. Call 
7760914 today. (99-73) 

1964 KARMANN Qhla Coup*, rebuilt engine, excellent con 
dlllon 537-2847. 1,89-7 1) 

CANON MF motor drive for Ft . Three months old with new 
warranty. 532-6555. ask for Craig Chandler. (89-73) 

PLYMOUTH CAR, four door. Good condition. Rebuilt engln*. 
1350. 10.000 BTu air conditioner, used only one summer. 
S60. Bargain. 778-3759. (70-71) 



"ROCK N ROLL" 
GOODIES! 

Guitars, Amps & P.A.'s demon- 
strated in a Large club size area. 
(NOW FULLY CARPETED) 
Come in and SEE! 
Gibson L6S-Custom w/case 
was 688.00 now $349.00 

Gibson EB series Bass gtr. 
was 329.00 now $199.00 

Fender Stratocaster Nat. (New) 

♦Special* 
Ibanez Les Paul Cust. Copy 

(collectable) 
was 349.00 now $239.00 

Gibson J-45 Dlxe Acoustic (new) 
was 519.00 now $379.00 

at 

MUSIC VILLAGE 

417 Humboldt Downtown Thurs. till8:30 



ONE BEDROOM furnished apartment Utilities paid, 
required, no pels 537*734 or 776-5763. (68-71J 

NEAR CAMPUS, 2 or 3 main, prlval* room*, nice 
home 537-4263 or 539-2683 (68-76) 

NICE ONE bedroom apartment, good location 1100, S3fr 

7124.5399985.(69-73) 

ONE BEDROOM apartment, one block west of campus 
Available January 1st, $130 a month. 776>1096or 537 2522. 
(89-76) 

LARGE NICELY furnished one bedroom basement apart 
men! 822 Valuer St Couple or two singles. Under (150 
plus electricity. No pel*. 776-8055 (69 78) 

LARGE FURNISHED two bedroom, one and on* had bath, 
balcony, laundry faculties, water and trash paid. Moro, 
available January 1 at 7 76- 7748. < 70- 76) 

NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 

from $165 

• FREE shuttle service to 
KSU 

• portion of utilities paid 

• adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

PHONE 

539-2951 

or see at 
1413 Cambridge Place 



ONE BEDROOM and large two bedroom apartments near 
campus. Available January 1st. 537-2344. (70-79) 

BARGAIN TWO bedroom apartment at Wildcat Creek tor 
*210 • month. Sublease will run from January 1 lo May 30 
Willing to negotiate over terms. Call 7764568 between 630 
p.m. *nd midnight tor more Information. (70-74) 



WILDCAT INN 

2nd Semester 

Seniors Graduating 

Make Limited Availability 



FOR S5.50 per hour, for each person In group* ot ihre*. will 
glv* local flight around Manhattan and surrounding area or 
cross country lllghts. Cruise 130 or 140 mph. Call Sob, 779- 
7424. (For th* faster aircraft, cost will be tt.50 mora per 
hour per parson.) (7 1 -74J 

OH NO! West Hall week ends today! We're ready to dine and 
dance (and make romance I) at our own special parly And 
the lun In the West Hall sun will continue. (71) 



SERVICES 

RESUMES WRITTEN from scratch. SIS and up. Also genersl 
typing, writing, editing. Fast Action Resumes, 415 N. 3rd, 
537-7294. (96-76) 

STEREO REPAIR, over 500 replacement style* In stock Th* 
Circuit Strap, 779-1221, 1204 Moro St (9-78) 

THE OFFSET Press print* anything: resumes, brochure*, let 
ter heeds, posters, pamphlets, newspaper*. Let us do your 
next Job. 317 Houston. 7794869 (22 tl) 

ENGAGEMENT RINGS, wedding **ts. Custom designing In 

gold and silver Jewelry repair Including antique lewalry 
Custom Jewelers. 539-3225 41 1 N. Third. (55-74) 



SOUPENE 
COMPUTER 

WHEEL 
ALIGNMENT 

114 South 5th Phone 776-8054 



CHRISTMAS PORTRAITS Pastel, charcoal and pencil 
likeness. Guaranteed Price* from IS lo 815. Llv* or from 
photo Call 778-3684 (60-76) 

WILL DO typing (term papers, resumes, ate.). Any type of 
material. Am experienced. Call 778-0066 (70-74) 



NOTICES 



8. 411) Street. 776- 
typewriters, guitar*, 



MANHATTAN PAWN Shop. 317 

81 12— stereos, 9-tracks, TV'*, 
cameras Buy -sell -trade (3-75) 

SHIPPING OVERSEAS alter graduation? Call Overseas Ship- 
ping Consultants for rate* and free estimate: 779-5213. 
Box S9S, Manhattan (68-76) 



Lucilles— Westloop 



20% OFF 



PEACE LUTHERAN Church Invites you lo our 8:15 am and 
1030 *.m. Sunday **rvks**. Go 1/2 mil* weat ot stadium on 
Kimball. We am Mendty (71) 

COLLEGE HEIGHTS Baptist Church. 2231 College Height* 
Road. Worship 9:45 *.m. and 7:00 p.m. Bible Study 1 1:00 
a.m. Phone 339-3599. Bill Foil, Pastor. (71) 

FIRST LUTHERAN Church, 10th and PoyntZ. University 
students are Invited lo attend a Bible Study Group that 
meets In the basement of th* main building of the Church 
at 9:40 a.m. on Sunday*. Worahlp service at 8:30 a.m. and 
11:00 a.m. Pastors, Milton J. Olson 539-1879. Thorn** F. 
Schaetfer 776-1966 (71) 

COME JOIN US 
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

2121 Blue Hills Rd. 

539-8691 

Church School 

9:45a.m. 

Worship 

11:00a.m. 



For Free Rides 



Call Bell Taxi 



537-2080 



GRACE BAPTIST Church. 2901 Ofckens, welcomes you to 
Worship Services at 8:30 and 11:00 a.m. University Class 
meet* at 9:45 e.m Evening service ADO p.m. Horace 
Bralslord, Ken Edirjer 7764424. (71) 

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

Juliette and Vattier 537-7633 

SundaySchool 9:45a.m. 

Morning Worship 11:00a.m. 

Evening Service 7:00p.m. 

College Class meets in Reynards' Restaurant in 
Wal-Mart Shopping Center at 9:20 a.m. All studen- 
ts welcome! 
Ministers: 
GeneT. Neeley— Pastor 

Phone: 537-7967 
Larry K. Hartman— Asst. Pastor 

Phone: 7764036 

MISS THE small church atmosphere? Come worship with u*. 
Keats United Methodist Church, 6 miles west ol KSU on 
Anderson. Church, 9:00 a.m.; Sunday School. 1040 a.m. 
(TD 

MANHATTAN WESUYAN Church, Poyntz and Manhattan 
Ave. Worship, 8:30 and 1055 MM Sunday School, 9:45 
• m. A vital biblical fellowship. (71) 



You are invited to join us 
at the 



AM/FM STEREO receiver wllh built-in 8 Irack and speakers 
BSR 4800 turntable Call 539-9701 and ask tor Todd O'Nsll 
(70-71) 

USED HOOVER w*»her. Best olter, call 776-3510 (70-72) 

< AKC REGISTERED Dachshund puppies ready In lime for 
Christmas Call 778-9807, evenings. (70-74) 



FOR RENT 



TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electrics and manuals: day, week 
or month, Buuells, 511 Leavenworth, acres* from post ol- 
IIC*. Call 776-9469 (111) 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS: Excellent selacllon. Hull Business 
Machines. 1212 Moro, 539-7901. Service most makes ol 
I y pew rl t ers A I so V ic 1 g r a nd 1 1 vel 1 1 a dda rs ( 1 8t 1 1 

SANTA SUITS. R*s*rve your* noyr. Treasure Chest, 
Aggie vine (43-78) 

LARGE TWO bedroom apartment with two sleeping lofts, 
1270, bill* paid, at 1016 Osage, 537-4233 (57 71} 

LARQE ONE bedroom furnished apartment at 221 N. Juliette. 
Water, trash, and heat paid, (180 per month. 776-38*8 or 1- 
456-9614. (64-76) 

TWO BEDROOM basement apartment, lurnlshed 
WssherrdTyer hook up. $1 60 plus KPL, at 1822 Hunting, one 
half block from KSU. 5398401 . (66-80) 

LARGE FURNISHED apartment at 1016 Osage, bedrooms 
snd sleeping lofts, good lor 34 people 1250. bills paid. 
537-4233. <8S*5> 

FURNISHED BEDROOMS, kitchen and laundry facilities, 
free parking and walk to KSU. S55 and up, bills paid. 537- 
4233. (68-95) 

THROUGH MAY, furnished Iwo bedroom apartment. Dish- 
washer, air conditioned. Available January 1 . Close to cam- 
pus Call 537 7288 attar 5:30 p m (67-71) 

HUGE ROOM to rent, USfmonth, all untitles paid, kitchen, 
laundry facilities. Five minute walk lo campus. Call 532- 
6850 (9-5). Leave messag* tor Rich Ellen son. will return 
call. (68-71) 

LARGE, FURNISHED, two bedroom apartment. One and one 
hall blocks from campus, ground floor, clean. No lease, no 
pe t*. 1 1 SO p lu a e leetrlc I ty . 539-42 75. (68-72) 

MUST SEE this large on* bedroom furnished duple* 
Redecorated, country setting, close to town ties No 
pets. 7764848. (6872) 



Villa Apartments 
526 N. 14th 

Available January 
2 Blocks from campus 

ONE-BEDROOM 
FURNISHED 

$200 A MONTH 

—No pels or children- 
Call 
537-9567 or 539-1201 



LARGE THREE bedroom house. 1104 Bluemonl. Available 
January 1st One and one hail bathrooms, hash, water 
paid. 7764300 or 539-8401 (70-731 

FOUR BEDROOM house, one block from campwr F :>'•£•»■ 
large living arse Available Dec 15 Phone 537.4648. (70-74) 

IDEAL FURNISHED iwo bedroom apartment, water. Irash 
and heating paid Close to campus. Available at end ol 
semester 1210 Call 539-3178. (70-72) 



For 2nd Semester 
Occupancy 

Call 

CELESTE 
for Information 

539-5001 



TRAILER, CLOSE to campus, clean, must be student. 
Available now to end ol next semester 776-5692. (70-72) 

*t 10 WILL rent a lurnlshed apartment with washer/dryer at 
1870 Elaine. Call 5394170. (71-73) 

ONE BEDROOM apart me nt available at 814 Leavenworth. 
Call 537-2002 or 539-3672. (71-75) 



HELP WANTED 



OVERSEAS JOBS— Summer/lull time. Europe. S America, 
Australia, Asia, etc. All fields, S500-1200 monthly, ex- 
penses paid, sightseeing. Free Into. Write: Internet Ions I 
Job Center. Box 4490-KB. Berkeley, CA 04704 (60-79) 

BURGER KING wants Individual to work two night* during 
the week, TOO p.m. to 1:00 *.m. One weekend night 
required 7:00 p.m. to 3 .00 a.m. Start 12.85 per hour. S3 after 
on* month. Contact Mr. Wagner or Mr Nelson In person. 
(66-76) 

WAITRESS-WAITERS and bus persona part-lime work. Good 
working conditions, good wages plus meals. Apply now In 
person to start when you come back tor second semester, 
Reynard's Restaurant. (68-71) 

PART TIME campus represents! Iva position available im- 
mediately. Aggressive, highly motivated Individual needed 
to sell Spring Break sun and ski package*. Excellent com- 
mission plus (ravel benefits. Call Summit Travel. Inc. (314) 
8744171 immediately for an application. (89-72) 

WAITRESSES, WAITERS and bartender* needed Apply al 
F I a no I g* n ■ s , 1 1 22 Moro, afternoons. (70-7 1 > 

BARTENDERS AND floor walkers to work part-lime. Must 
work weekends Apply in person, 1216 Laramie. 1 1:00 a.m - 
12 noon and 1:00 p.m. dally, or phone 5394525 tor ap- 
pointment. (70-74) 

AQGIE SOUND Enterprise* needs a OJ with I ha talent to en 
tertaln the older generation (30-100) with music ol their 
pasl lo the present. Earnings negotiable depending on ex- 
perience snd willingness to advertise. Work available over 
break 776-9279(71-73) 



ATTENTION 



ATTENTION LADIES: KSU football recruiting has started and 
we need you for Kitten Krultera. Involves Saturday af- 
ternoons hosting recruits for lunch snd tour ot Manhattan. 
If interested, call 532-5876 (65-71) 

HAVE A Christmas cookie and enjoy your shopping at Wind- 
lire Jewelry, 230 N. 3rd Semi-precious gemstone 
necklaces S3. 00. Large scenic picture jasper bracelets 
only 13100. regular $47.00. Tiger eye bracelets $10 67 
Crazy lace agate bracelets only $30 00 Men's solid blue 
denim coral chokers $12 00. penshell $10 00 Men's gold 
and sliver nstural turquoise rings 50% oil, now $34.50. 
Mother of Pearl stickpin* $8.00. bracelets $8.00. rings, 
$6.00, necklaces tto.00 and $8 00 All handmade sterling 
Silver, turquoise bracelets $800 to $26.00. Opal ring 14k 
gold regular $135 00. now $100.00 Opal necklsces now 
$21.00. Men's and ladles tricolor 14k gold rings 25% off 
Custom orders must be made this week on our remaining 
stones, sale prices included: Free turquoise earrings with 
every $45.00 purchase. (69-78) 

THE FOLLOWING people have not picked up 1 978 Royal Pur- 
plea— gel them in Kedzie 103 Maasoud Chltsaz, Lynn D, 
Christie. Douglas Classes n. Crisis C. Clark, Steven F 
Clark, Brent M Clark, Timothy Cleary, Richard T. Clem 
mons, Sean Cllpshsm. (69-71) 



AND MORE ON 

EVERYTHING 

IN OUR 
STORE 

until Dec. 25 



ATTENTION SNOWSKIIERS: Thsre are still four placea 
available on a student bus trip to Winter Park, Colorado, 
January a 15, Everything included except food and booze 
tor 5 day* of sh ling-only $200, call 776-1743. (69-71) 

BERGGREN STUDIO sale, ceramic* and paintings, Saturday. 
December 9. from 900 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 1701 Sheffield, (take 
Kimball to Hudson, than south to She file Ml, or call 538- 
3035 for appointment. (69-71) 



Christmas Concerto by Corelli: 
And 

THE HOUSE BY THE 
STABLE 

A Religious Drama In Verse 

By 

Charles Williams 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church 
6th & Poyntz 

Sun. Dec. 10 4:00P.M. 

No Admission Charge 



THE FOLLOWING people have not picked up 1978 Royal Pur. 
pies— get Ihem In Kedzie 103. Massoud Chnsaz, Lynn D. 
Christie. Douglas Ciaassen, Crista C. Clark, Steven F. 
Clark, Brent M. Clark. Timothy Cleary, Richard T Com- 
mons, Sean Clips ham. (89-71) 



WELCOME 



MASSES AT Calhollc Student Center, 71 1 Oenlson, 9:00 a.m .. 
10:00 a.m . 1 1: 15 a.m., 1 2:1 5 and 5:00 p.m. Sunday* Week- 
days 4:30 p.m. Saturdays 5:00 P m (71) 

CHURCH OF the Nazarene. 1000 Fremont, Sunday School. 
10:00 a.m.; Evanlng Service, 6:30 p.m.; Prayer Sarvlc*. 
Wednesday. 7:00 p.m. (71) 

WORSHIP ON campus at All-Faiths Chapel. 1045 a.m. 
Evening service 6:30 p.m. 1225 Bertrand, the University 
Christian Church, Douglas D. Smith, minister We're un- 
denominational! (71) 



FIRST UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Sixth and Poyntz 

9:45a.m. "The Open Door" 
Dialogue and Study 

Educational Center 

Rm.2526 

11 a.m. Divine Worship 

Rides Available 
Call 776-8821 



WELCOME STUDENTS! First Christian Church. 115 N. 5th 
College class, 9:45 a.m.: Worship, 1 1.-00 a.m. Minister*: 
Ben Duerfeldt, 539-8885. BUI Mc Cute hen, 778-9747, For 
transportation call 77M790 after 9:00 a.m. Sundays. (71) 

MENNONITE FELLOWSHIP, Sunday School at 9:30 a.m. 
Worship al 10:30 a.m. Located at 1021 Den I son st the ECM 
building (old UMHE building). Mike Klassan, 5394079. (71) 



Welcome to 

The Celebration of 

Worship on Sunday 

At9:00a.m. & 11:00 a.m. 

at 

FIRST 

PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 

8th & Leavenworth 
(537-0518) 



The Blue Bus will 

call by Goodnow at 

10:35a.m., Boyd 4 West 

at 10: 40 a.m for the 

11:00a. m, service. It will 

return to campus following 

the service. 



ST, PAUL'S Episcopal Church welcome* you. Sunday ser- 
vices 8:00 a.m.- 11-00 am. Daily services, 5:30 p.m. Holy 
Communion, Tuesday 10:00* m . Thursday 5:30 p.m. Blbls 
reading discussion clsss Sundays 9:30 a.m., 6th snd Poyn- 
a. 776.9427,(71) 

WELCOME TO I he Church ol Chris I, 2510 Dickens, Sunday 
. . . 9:30 am , Bible classes. 10:30 a.m.. Worship snd Com 
munlon 6:00 p.m., evening Worship Harold Mitchell. 
minister 53W581 or 539-9212. (71) 



1 



II 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Fit, D«c«mt»r 6, 1978 



Meeting in Guadeloupe 

Carter to confer with leaders about SALT 



WASHINGTON (AP) -President Carter 
said Thursday he will brief leaders of 
France, Britain and West Germany on 
details of a nearly complete strategic arms 
agreement at a midwinter summit in the 
Caribbean. 

He said the United States and Russia are 
separated in the SALT talks by only minor 
differences, which he can see a way to 
resolve provided the Soviets are willing to 
continue what he called "steady progress" 
in the talks. 

It was announced Thursday that Carter 
and the three European leaders will meet 
Jan. 5-6 in extraordinary privacy on 
Guadeloupe, which is French territory. 

Discussions are to range over a wide 
variety of subjects, including SALT talks, 
but no public announcements or daily news 
briefings are planned. 

New House speaker 
begins appointments 

TOPEKA (AP)— House Speaker-elect 
Wendell Lady (R-Overland Park) tapped a 
fellow Kansas City -area Republican, Carlos 
Cooper, Thursday to be the chairman of the 
House Reapportionment Committee, which' 
will draw up new political boundaries next 
session to bring the House membership into 
conformity with recent population changes. 

Cooper (R- Bonner Springs), who has 
served eight years in the Legislature, op- 
posed Lady earlier this week in a bid for 
House speaker Lady defeated Cooper on a 
close 37-32 vote. 



CARTER TOLD reporters at a breakfast 
meeting at the White House that he plans to 
discuss U.S. SALT proposals "in final form" 
as well as the remaining points of dispute, 
"if any." 

"I doubt if we will have a final agreement 
to go over with the other European leaders 
in Guadeloupe, but we will have the SALT 
proposals that we have in almost final— our 
proposals, probably, in final form, when we 
get to Guadeloupe, and an accurate 
description to the other leaders of the 
remaining differences, if any, at that time," 
Carter said. 

"I have been pleased recently with the 
progress being made on SALT. The 
remaining differences are minor, compared 
to what they were a year ago, and in my own 
mind, I can see a way to resolve them," he 
said, adding "If the Soviets are adequately 
forthcoming, I would guess that any further 
de lay would be minima I . " 

He said there has never been a time in 
SALT talks where the two parties 
retrogressed. "There has been steady 
progress," he said. 

The president said the four leaders had 
agreed to the January meeting last July, 
when they had a similar get-together during 



an economic summit that also included 
Japan, Canada and Italy. 

Carter said French President Valery 
Giscard d'Estaing issued the invitation to 
meet on Guadeloupe. 

It will be "a somewhat social affair, but 
we'll also be discussing issues and meeting 



privately to discuss questions that affect us 
all," Carter said. 

In Paris, a French government 
spokesman said discussions will focus on 
' 'the state of the world at the end of 197B." 

Also attending will be West German 
Chancellor Helmut Schmidt. 




HAIR BY RICK fc FRIENDS 



>: RlL>KFN 



ttlONAL UHt Of WIN 
MATMfNT 



Ton ht*t itaw» W* wIm *«* r*n* rtncml tUf 

h nm o-., 776*5222 



BUSINESS SENIORS 

Interested in Resume Booklet 

Pick Up Data Sheet For 

CBA Resume Booklet In 

Dean's Office In Calvin 

By Wed., Dec. 13th 

Have Them In 
By Fri., Dec. 15th 

(Form Is Identical To 
Placement Centers) 




Come to Scrumpdillyishusland 

Try A 

Brownie Delight 



or 



Hot Fudge Sundae Supreme 



•& 



•«•». U.S. Pat. Off., Am. D.Q. Corp. 
©Copyright 1974, Am. D.Q. Coo>. 



DAIRY QUEEN BRAZIER 

1015 N. 3rd 




Come 

TGIF 

TODAY 

1-6 p.m. 



Dark Horse Tavern 



First T«n Kegs Fret tor rhosa 
Mfrh Adimy Cards 

M.35 Pitchers 



HEY SENIORS 
It's Another Party! 



Senior Shirts and Activity Cards stil on Sale at Hols House 




' » 



KANSA3 STATE :.: . L SOCIETY 

tq^ka, ks 6&t»i2 exca 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December 11, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities, 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637," Cross said. 
"We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building." 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the slate and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November 1980, 
Cross said. 



4 






. 



JL ■ 



« 



*$ 



* 



Vance attempts to spark 



ON Utile QiplOmaCy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt (AP)— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 




..«*.<*»] 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an*. Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 



Massive nrntest ends 

mceinlran 



f 







1C/1978 



W •>»* 



Supplement to the K<v«S£ ^a Collaoiarv 

: ■ h 



ie six-hour procession. The official Iranian 
:«s agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
jt said the march was in honor of World 
uman Rights Day, which was Sunday. 

THE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
Miners and placards, many written in 
ftglish for the benefit of foreign journalists 
•d television cameras. One placard 
dbdely written in chalk demanded 
Yankees Go Home!" University students 
lipped reporters, demanding they "tell 
iBimy Carter we want democracy and not a 
>yal tyrant." 

Westerners, especially Americans, have 
scome the symbol of foreign support for 
lah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
'tst hostility has touched off a mass exodus 

some 9,000 foreigners, including about 
(Americans. 

'resident Carter has repeatedly stressed 

jport for the shah, but the State Depar- 
|ent has said the United States will not 
[ervene. State Department spokesman 
■ry Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 
jrale to describe the exodus as an 
evacuation" and that between 35,000 and 
^001) Americans a re still in Iran. . 

'No blood was spilled," an official of 

Bijaby's National Front said of the march, 

Today we proved that the opposition is 

lore than just a bunch of hotheads and 

Hsidents, as the shah's people claim. The 

ssage we sent to the palace today cannot 
ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
bod bath." 

]jn Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
((ritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
Itnbol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
It march to be "an absolute success... ft 
lowed the shah has little support left," an 
lie to Khomaini said. 

I The religious leader has called on 
lam. ms to spill their blood until the 59-year- 
|| shah is ousted. 

rfore the march began, thousands of the 
(See VIOLENCE, p. 2> 



iside 






THE WILDCATS racked up another 
fin Saturday night against Cat Poly 
tomona. See game details and pictures, 
, Ages 11 and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency Set- 
tee Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
ames, ready to assist fans who are 
i |ured or become III, More, page 8... 

NEW TEACHER evaulations are being 
wn up for the Arts and Sciences 
-ofessors. See page 6.. 






-3 lUAi .. 
TOPEKA, K3 



■ • m -:t t 
bxch 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December 11, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637," Cross said. 
' 'We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building." 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November 1980, 
Cross said. 



Vance attempts to spark 



ShUttlS CliplOmaCy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIKO, Egypt (API— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the a ward on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation " 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that 'if and when" it is signed 
a new era of ' 'understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt am i Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 




Massive nrnfeSt ends 

mceinlran 



* 




'All the world's a stage, 
And all the men and women merely players. 

They have their exits and their entrances, 
And one man In his time plays many parts,...' 

William Shakespeare 



if six -hour procession. The official Iranian 
Iws agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
lit said the march was in honor of World 
uman Bights Day, which was Sunday. 

THE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
inners and placards, many written in 
figlish for the benefit of foreign journalists 
|d television cameras. One placard 
judely written in chalk demanded 
fankees Go Home!" University students 
appcd reporters, demanding they "tell 
mi my Carter we want democracy and not a 
*al tyrant." 

Westerners, especially Americans, have 
jtome the symbol of foreign support for 
tah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
F esl hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
' some 9,000 foreigners, including about 
900 Americans. 

president Carter has repeatedly stressed 
ipporl for the shah, but the State Depar- 
Oenl has said the United States will not 
tervene. State Department spokesman 
ary Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 
iratf to describe the exodus as an 
jvacuation" and that between 35,000 and 
t^ooo Americans are still in Iran. 
* r 'No blood was spilled," an official of 
urjaby s National Front said of the march. 
(Joday we proved that the opposition is 
•re than just a bunch of hotheads and 
fsidents, as the shah's people claim. The 
issage we sent to the palace today cannot 
r ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
jodbath." 

In Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
(ritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 

ibol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
march to be "an absolute success... It 

>wed the shah has little support left," an 
|e to Khomaini said. 
The religious leader has called on 
inians to spill their blood until the 59-year- 

shah is ousted. 

>fore the march began, thousands of the 
(See VIOLENCE, p. 2) 



iside 



,> 



i 



THE WILDCATS racked up another 
'in Saturday night against Cat Poly- 
tomona. See game details and pictures, 
•ges 11 and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency 5er 
ice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
Imes, ready to assist fans who are 
ijuredor become ill. More, page 8... 

NEW TEACHER emulations are being 
•awn up for the Arts and Sciences 
•ofessors. See page 6.. 



,3 STATE :,; 30GI2TT 

TOKKA, KS 66612 \ ;;i 



t 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December 11, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 85, No, 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec, 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637,'* Cross said. 
"We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building.'' 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track. Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work lo be completed, so the building 
shuuld be done around November 1980, 
Cross said. 



Vance attempts to spark 



bhUttle QiplOmaCy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt (AP)— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

C.s. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an*. Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 




Massive nrntest ends 



4 



All the world's a stage... 






4 

6 
8 

10 
12 

14 



Working ourselves toward life 

A look at why we create 
Jean Sloop: 'I always knew I would go into music* 

T eacher and performer 

Creativity: 'being mentally untied* 

Cartoonist, actor, studenL.David Greusel 

A squad with the bug* 
They have fun 

Overachievers— Its all a matter of priorities 
We all know one 

1 am a dancer, a dancer dances' 

Body over mind or mind over body? 



At Kansas State University DecemberJO. JQ78 




* 



niMEN5IONS is a monthly magazine supplement to the 
K.n« S Sta e Co«.eg ian, Kansas State University. Offices are 
m theW-h wing of Kedzle Hall, phone SB** 

ni ucw<imNS is a project of Robert Bontrager's Magazine 
Pr °oS '^s Student Publications, Inc., and the 
lament of Journalism sponsor the magazine. 



DIMENSIONS EDITOR - Deb Williams 

DIMENSIONS STAFF - Chris Baumehen, Sue Frelden- 
berger, Sandy Killlan, Kelly Wilkerson 

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS — Susan Brink, Randy Shuck, 
Kelly Swoftord, Beccy Tanner 

PHOTOGRAPHY — Sue Pfannmuller, Bo Rader, Pete 
Souza, Nancy Zogleman 

ILLUSTRATIONS — Steve Faten, Dave Greusel, Phyllis 
Groth 

COLLEGIAN EDITOR — Paul Rhodes 
PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR — Nancy Nipper 



mce in Iran 

*e six-hour procession. The official Iranian 
ews agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
Ut said the march was in honor of World 
luman Rights Day, which was Sunday. 

THE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
anners and placards, many written in 
friglish for the benefit of foreign journalists 
id television cameras. One placard 
fudely written in chalk demanded 
Vankees Go Home!" University students 
*>pped reporters, demanding they "tell 
ifnmy Carter we want democracy and not a 
»al tyrant." 

Westerners, especially Americans, have 
Bcomt* the symbol of foreign support for 
4a h Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
f est hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
' some 9,000 foreigners, including about 
BOO Americans. 

President Carter has repeatedly stressed 
import for the shah, but the State Depar- 
oent has said the United States will not 
iervene. State Department spokesman 
iary Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 
p-ate to describe the exodus as an 
yvacuation" and that between 35,000 and 
yjOO Americans are still in Iran. - 
^'No blood was spilled," an official of 
ifijaby's National Front said of the march, 
ftxiay we proved that the opposition is 
ore than just a bunch of hotheads and 
fiidents, as the shah's people claim. The 
tssage we sent to the palace today cannot 
j ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
aodbath." 

In Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
iritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
pibol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
t march to be "an absolute success.. .It 
owed the shah has little support left," an 
le to Khomaini said. 

The religious leader has called on 
inians to spill their blood until the 59-year- 
i shah is ousted. 
Before the march began, thousands of the 

i(SeeVIOLENCE,p,2> 
side 

THE WILDCATS racked up another 
fin Saturday night against Cal Poly 
Om on a. See game details and pictures, 
ages n and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser 
Ice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
imes, ready to assist fans who are 
ljured or become III. More, page a... 

NEW TEACHE Revaulaiions are being 
-awn up lor the Arts and Sciences 
lessors . See page 6. . 



: 






& 8TA1 
TOPrKA, KS 



I I t 

£xc;i 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December 11, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Kinal plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec. IS. funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637," Cross said. 
"We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building." 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
wurk to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November 1980, 
Cross said. 



Vance attempts to spark 



bflUttlB uiplOmaCy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt (AP>— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peaceand 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an<. Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 



Massive nrotest ends 

>nce in Iran 



i 






) 

> 







e six-hour procession. The official Iranian 
ews agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
jt said the march was in honor of World 

iman Bights Day, which was Sunday. 

fHE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
n tiers and placards, many written in 
«lish for the benefit of foreign journalists 
id television cameras. One placard 
udely written in chalk demanded 
Yankees Go Home!" University students 
ipped reporters, demanding they "tell 
nmy Carter we want democracy and not a 
/<il tyrant." 

Westerners, especially Americans, have 
come the symbol of foreign support for 
ah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
cs l hast i I it y has touched off a mass exodus 
gome 9,000 foreigners, including about 
•00 Americans. 

President Carter has repeatedly stressed 
pport for the shah, but the State Depar- 
<ent has said the United States will not 
tarvene State Department spokesman 
iry Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 
rale to describe the exodus as an 
/acuation" and that between 35,000 and 
000 Americans are still in Iran. 
'No blood was spilled," an official of 
ijaby's National Front said of the march, 
oday we proved that the opposition is 
ce than just a bunch of hotheads and 
sidents, as the shah's people claim. The 
ssage we sent to the palace today cannot 
ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
odbath." 

n Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
ritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
nbol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
march to be "an absolute success... It 
•wed the shah has little support left," an 
e to Khomaini said. 

he religious leader has called on 
mans to spill their blood until the 59-year - 
ghah is ousted. 

lefore the march began, thousands of the 
(See VIOLENCE, p. 2) 



iside 



THE WILDCATS racked up another 
n Saturday night against Ca1 Poly 

omona. See game details and pictures, 

iges It and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser- 
ee Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
iflnes, ready to assist fans who are 
jured or become ill. More, page 8... 

NEW TEACHER evaulatlons are being 
»wn up for the Arts and Sciences 
Ofessors. See page 6.. 



DIMENSIONS 



KANSAS S1AI,. i;;t Y 

TOPrKA, KS 66(42 EXCil 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December 11, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637," Cross said. 
"We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building." 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November 1980, 
Cross said, 



Vance attempts to spark 



bflUltlB CliplOmaCy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt (AP)— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the a ward on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation. " 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an., Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 




Massive orotest ends 






Working Ourselves Toward Life 

'The whole difference between construction and creation is 
exactly this: that a thing constructed can only be loved after 
it is constructed; but a thing created is loved before it exists.' 

Gilbert Keith Chesterson 



i 

> 

i 



i 



In the human society there exists an 
enigma, known as the creative person. 
These are the artists, actors, dancers, 
the engineers, doctors, inventors. 

They classify as enigmas because 
they have dared to step beyond the 
boundaries of society in the practice of 
their professions. 

Kules imposed on the individual by 
society serve to destroy creative urges, 
David Hacker, visiting professor in 
journalism and mass communications, 
said. 

*i think most people can be creative, 
but very few are encouraged to be. 
There is a very strong degree of con 
formity in the human race... Most 
people don't have much imagination, 
which doesn't mean they can't. It's just 
that our education system, parents, 
the way we're raised, our culture, puts 
a very low premium on difference; on 
finding your answer, your solution," 
Hacker said. 

Those who can take this step beyond 

the boundaries of society's rules, in a 

successul manner, sometimes are 

/** rewarded for their bravery by 

• • becoming recognized as special people. 

The artist is honored for his art, the 
actor his performance. 

The ability of these people to gain 
recognition for their achievements is 
explained as "their ability to transcend 
human limits,... to be better than 
themselves," Leon Rappoport, 111- 



Oecember 1978 



structor of psychology, said. 

"In a performance— writing, stage, 
singing, dancing, bullfighting— the 
creative person transcends human 
limits in a physical way," Rappoport 
said. "In art, transcendence takes a 
different form. Art is a mode of ex- 
pressing something singular about life 
that the artist is able to do. " 

This transcendence the individual 
achieves is a difference evolved from 
work and devotion as much as from 
natural aptitude, Hacker said. 

"The old cliche, 'genius is 10 percent 
inspiration and 90 percent per- 
spiration,' is true," he said. "They say 
of Thomas Edison that it took him 
10,000 tries before he came up with a 
successful battery. What kind of genius 
is 10,000 tries?" Hacker said. "The 
genius was envisioning the theoretical 
possibility of a battery and to have the 
persistence to keep at it. Genius unused 
is genius non-existent." 

This devotion to, fixation with, their 
areas of creativity makes creative 
persons seem odd or eccentric, to the 
people around them, Rappoport said. 

"They are often more likely to be a 
little bizarre, a little unsatisfactory as a 
friend or colleague," Rappoport said. 
"Their loyalty is not to their immediate 
friends or to the usual things moat of us 
are loyal to. Their loyalty is to the art, 
their activity, otherwise, they wouldn't 
excel at it." 



By Randy Shuck 

Those who do excel in their area— the 
Picassos. Curies, Einsteins— bridge a 
gap impassable to the mass humanity. 
They have become one with the years. 
They are the artists among artists, and 
express the extremes in the striving of 
all mortals. Hacker said. 

"Creativity is a dialogue with death," 
he said. "It's our way of trying to avoid 
death, I think love relationships a re one 
way we try to cheat death. We're 
hiding, desperately trying to avoid it, 
and trying to store up experiences 
before the master stroke hits us," 
Hacker said. "I think one explanation 
for some creativity is that it's our way 
of grasping at immortality. We want 
history to feel the jab (made by our 
efforts) as long as possible." 

The essence of creative expression to 
Lucy Hermann, sophomore in fine arts, 
is the satisfaction of experiencing life to 
its fullest rather than a grasp at im- 
mortality. 

"Rather than say that performers 
work themselves to death for their art, 
it would be more appropriate to say 
they work themselves toward life," 
Hermann said. 

"You have to invent new ways to do 
things, new ways to seeing the sun; 
words, new ways to say things," 
Hacker said. "Creativity is also risky, 
you have to be willing to try something, 
try anything." 



mce in Iran 

ti six-hour procession. The official Iranian 
ws agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
t said the march was in honor of World 
luman Rights Day, which was Sunday 



THE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
anners and placards, many written in 
Inglish for the benefit of foreign journalists 
nd television cameras. One placard 
rudely written in chalk demanded 
Vankees Go Home!" University students 
topped reporters, demanding they "tell 
immy Carter we want democracy and not a 
iyal tyrant." 

'Westerners, especially Americans, have 
fccome the symbol of foreign support for 
fiah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
test hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
J some 9,000 foreigners, including about 
(000 Americans. 

■ President Carter has repeatedly stressed 
import for the shah, but the State Depar- 
Kient has said the United States will not 
Jtervene, State Department spokesman 
(ary Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 

irate to describe the exodus as an 

evacuation" and that between 35,000 and 

,000 Americans are still in Iran. . 

"No blood was spilled," an official of 

njaby's National Front said of the march. 

'oday we proved that the opposition is 
-e than just a bunch of hotheads and 
r idents, as the shah's people claim. The 
lessage we sent to the palace today cannot 
e ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
loodbath." 

In Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
piritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
ymbol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
le march to be "an absolute success... It 
bowed the shah has little support left," an 
kle to Khomaini said. 

The religious leader has called on 
■anians to spill their blood until the 59-year- 
|d shah is ousted. 

Before the march began, thousands of the 
(See VIOLENCE, p. Z> 



' iside 



THE WILDCATS racked up another 
win Saturday night against Cal Poly- 
Pomona. See game details and pictures, 
►ages n and 13... 



MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser- 
vice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
lames, ready to assist fans who are 
n jured or become III. AAore, page 8. . . 



NEWTEACHER eva ulatlons are being 
trawn up for the Arts and Sciences 

>ro(essors. See page 6 



KANSAS BTATE !. -. ;• : ■ . .- 
'IQKKA, KS 66612 gXCH 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December 11, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec, 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637," Cross said. 
' 'We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building." 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November I960, 
Cross said. 



Oil Utile QiplOmaCy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt (API— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met. Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But be also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an<. Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace," 



Massive orotest ends 

nee in Iran 



Jean Sloop.- 

'I always knew 
I would go into 

music' 



By Susan Brink 



Life without music £ something Jean Sloop can't imagine 

Itwouldbelikecuttingoutmytongue,"shesaid 
Music has become almost a 24-hour-a-day life for SIooo 

rzt p t«tr r of rif but she sa * s *** ^SS 

LiX? i u Sl00p ? h,ghly individualistic. It doesn't slap 
together like a mathematical formula, and she says Lit! 
one of the th in gs she likes so well about .t. In fact.X Sly 
never considered doing anything else but singing 

Music was never so much a choice as a way of life " she 
said. "I always knew I would go into music" Sloop smUes 
when she tells how her mother once caught hwZSfS 
their back yard before she was even old enough to talk 

r or Sloop, music has been an ongoing career one in which 
she befeves she has been fortunate. And she likes ft he w' 
it s been, so she's never really set an ultimate goal 

I don t know that I really have an ultimate goal but I 

uTtim a n . l P y , w T ld,, ' t , say rve reaehed il S! *$*«» 

?iZt t g f i° Und£ so fina1 ' and ' taven't given muc 
though to it," she said. "I havean ongoing goal; mat is To be 
a good teacher, performer and a worthwhile pe Ion 2d no 1 
to lose the basic sense of vitality of being alive " 

J^^Jt™"!* 3 hefSeif as a P"> fe ssional singer and says 
much of her time is spent practicing for the various per 
formances she gives. tvai.uus.per- 

f„ri"h Parat i° n f ° r " er recitals first involves choosing a date 
for the performance, which must be done almost a year in 
advance. Then she collects the music she wants todo and bZ 
a primary read.ng session with her accompanist S 
month before the recital. 

Sloop says the relationship between accompanist and 
singer is "atrue ensemble in the sense that you get ?wo 
halves together and then the two halves make a whole 




six-hour procession. The official Iranian 
*» agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
' * siiid the march was in honor of World 
i nan Rights Day, which was Sunday 

tHE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 

mers and placards, many written in 

jlish for the benefit of foreign journalists 

television cameras. One placard 

tdely written in chalk demanded 

ankees Go Home!" University students 

|>ped reporters, demanding they "tell 

nmy Carter we want democracy and not a 

,iyal tyrant." 

Vesterners, especially Americans, have 

.Mine the symbol of foreign support for 

ah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti 

«st hostility has touched off a mass exodus 

some 9,000 foreigners, including about 

Uuo Americans. 

President Carter has repeatedly stressed 
»>port for the shah, but the State Depar- 
nent has said the United States will not 
Jervene. State Department spokesman 
lary Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 
urate to describe the exodus as an 
evacuation" and that between 35,000 and 
J.000 Americans are still in Iran. . 
"No blood was spilled," an official of 
anjaby's National Front said of the march. 
Today we proved that the opposition is 
.lore than just a bunch of hotheads and 
jssidents, as the shah's people claim. The 
nessage we sent to the palace today cannot 
£ ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
iloodbath." 

In Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
pi ritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 

Smbol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
e march to be "an absolute success... It 
owed the shah has little support left," an 
tide to Khomaini said. 
The religious leader has called on 
ranians to spill their blood until the 59-year - 
>id shah is ousted. 
Before the march began, thousands of the 
(See VIOLENCE, p. 2> 



"Music was never so much o choice as o "Confidence arnu« ™i„ a. 

Defence y OU9h ** Th *** cifi "9 thing about music is that ,t 

is a living art." 



nside 



THE WILDCATS racked up another 
win Saturday night against Cat Poly- 
Pomona. See game details and pictures, 
pages 11 and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser- 
vice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
games, ready to assist fans who are 
Injured or become ill. More, page 8... 

NEW T E ACH E R evaulations are being 
drawn up for the Arts and Sciences 
professors. See page 6.. 



way of life 
6 



DIMENSIONS 



KAHSA3 BTATE :.: 
TOWKA, KS 666X2 



: I ; 
£XCI1 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December 11, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol.85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637," Cross said. 
"We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building." 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the slate and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November I960, 
Cross said. 



Vance attempts to spark 



bflUttlB QiplOmaCy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt <AP>— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Mam, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an- Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 



4 






Massive orotest ends 



Getting those two halves to work together takes a great deal 
of separate, private time for each." 

For her, that private time involves concentrating on and 
learning the words to the music she will sing, and doing 
research on the composer and the poet. If the music she is 
singing is written in a foreign language, she also does 
translations during this time. Copies of the translated lyrics 
are distributed to the audience at her recital. 

For about a month preceding her concert, Sloop said she is 
completely preoccupied with the material she will be singing. 

"For a brief span of time you are sort of taken over by the 
music you're working with. You're consumed by the music, 
the artist and the poet, and you become totally absorbed in it 
all, "Sloop said. 

In order to fully concentrate on the music, Sloop said she 
needs some quiet time. 

"A good measure of what you have on your mind has to be 
as free as the rest of you, and often other things have to be put 
aside until after the recital. You need some mental space. 
Performers must somtimes, to some extent, be isolationists, 
because in the recital itself, they are so exposed," she said. 

A singer is directly affected by the things around 
him— state of mind, psychic condition and how willing he is to 
lay his neck on the line, Sloop said. He can't get sick, and 
sometimes just the anxiety of worrying about the concert can 
cause him to be fearful of performing. 

"Fright is not something you grow out of," Sloop said. 
"What does change is how you deal with that fear. A singer's 
chief obligation is to serve as a medium through which an 
idea or an emotion which was intended by the poet and 
composer is transmitted without letting fears get in the way. 

"The singer should think of the performance as a com- 



munication. He should be reminded that he is only a medium 
and relish the joy of that," she said. 

Sloop gets a tremendous high from performing. There are 
moments in singing, she says, when she feels she is almost 
able to do anything she wants to do. But, like any other 
profession, there are also moments of disappointment. 

Those moments don't bother her too much, though. 

"The exciting thing about music is that it's a living art," 
Sloop said. "If you blow it, there's always the possibility of 
doing it over again." 

That is probably the hardest thing she faces in teaching 
voice. Sloop said She tries to teach her students to be willing 
to take a chance. 

"Confidence grows only through experience," she said. 
"It's my job to provide the means by which the student, in 
spite of his basic concerns and fears, does what he can do as 
if heweren'tafraidtodoit." , 

The utmost consideration in teaching voice is to start 
where the individual student is musically, Sloop said. He 
must have an understanding of how the vocal instrument 
works, and be aware that the instrument must be carefully 
preserved. Then, she tries to help him come to a patient 
acceptance of where he is, and to trust that a maturation of 
his voice will happen in time. 

"Teaching performance is a little like being a country 
doctor," Sloop said, "You have to deal with each case as an 
individual. And you have to make the student operable away 
from the teacher. 

"1 also try to teach them to have a sense of humor, because 
the world is a pretty grim place otherwise. Without a sense of 
humor, one never feels he can afford to make mistakes," she 
said. 




» 



'The singer should think of the per- 
formance as communication. " 

December 1978 



"Teaching performance is a little tike 
being a country doctor, " 



"Voo 're consumed by the music, the 

artist and fhe poet. . , " 






mce in Iran 

he six hour procession. The official Iranian 
ews agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
tit said the march was in honor of World 
Juman Rights Day, which was Sunday. 

THE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
enners and placards, many written in 

inglish for the benefit of foreign journalists 
id television cameras. One placard 
■udely written in chalk demanded 
■Yankees Go Home!" University students 
topped reporters, demanding they "tell 
ijmmy Carter we want democracy and not a 
pyal tyrant." 

Westerners, especially Americans, have 
iccome the symbol of foreign support for 
{hah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
Vest hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
A some 9,000 foreigners, including about 
.,000 Americans 

President Carter has repeatedly stressed 
upporl for the shah, but the State Depar- 
ment has said the United States will not 
ntervene. State Department spokesman 
diary Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 
urate to describe the exodus as an 
'evacuation'' and that between 35.000 and 
i),ooo Americans are still in Iran. 

"No blood was spilled," an official of 
tenjaby's National Front said of the march. 
Today we proved that the opposition is 
(tore than just a bunch of hotheads and 
Bssidents, as the shah's people claim. The 
nessage we sent to the palace today cannot 
ib ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
flood bath." 

In Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
piritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
*mbol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
be march to be "an absolute success... It 
bowed the shah has little support left," an 
lide to Khomaini said. 

The religious leader has called on 
ranians to spill their blood until the 59-year- 
dd shah is ousted. 

Before the march began, thousands of the 
(See VIOLENCE, p. 2) 



iside 



p 

THE WILDCATS racked up another 
win Saturday night against Cat Poly- 
Pomona. See game details and pictures, 
pages 11 and 13... 



, 



MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser 
vice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
games, ready to assist fans who are 
injured or become Id. More, page 8... 



NEW TEACHE Regulations are being 
drawn up for the Arts and Sciences 
professors. See page 6.. 



KANSAS 8TA1 

TQPrKA, KS 66612 



t/. CII 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December IT, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total (3,510,637." Cross said. 
"We're going to he able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building." 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November 1980, 
Cross said. 



Vance attempts to spark 



bllUttle CliplOmaCy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt (API— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation. " 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of ' 'understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt am, Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 



icciiio r\r 



/> 



?*est ends 



...locking- collegiate... , nce j n | ran 



: 







£ six-hour procession. The official Iranian 
jws agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
It said the march was in honor of World 
uniiin Rights Day, which was Sunday. 

THE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
inners and placards, many written in 
pglish for the benefit of foreign journalists 
kd television cameras. One placard 
rudely written in chalk demanded 
Yankees Go Home!" University students 
lopped reporters, demanding they "tell 
ipimy Carter we want democracy and not a 
atyal tyrant." 

Westerners, especially Americans, have 
ecome the symbol of foreign support for 
bah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
Zest hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
I some 9,000 foreigners, including about 
,000 Americans. 

President Carter has repeatedly stressed 
upporl for the shah, but the State Depar- 
tnenl has said the United States will not 
otervene. State Department spokesman 
lary Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac 
urate to describe the exodus as an 
'evacuation" and that between 35,000 and 
O.OOOAmericansarestillinlran. . 
"No blood was spilled," an official of 
ianjabys National Front said of the march. 
"Today we proved that the opposition is 
nore than just a bunch of hotheads and 
li ssule.nl s. as the shah's people claim. The 
nessage we sent to the palace today cannot 
te ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
iloodbath." 

In Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
spiritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
^mbol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
he march to be "an absolute success.. .It 
ihowed the shah has little support left," an 
fide to Khomaini said. 

The religious leader has called on 
ranians to spill their blood until the 59-year - 
ild shah is ousted. 
Before the march began, thousands of the 
(SeeVIOLENCE,p.2> 



nside 



THE WILDCATS racked up another 
win Saturday night against Cat Poly- 
Pomona. See game details and pictures, 
pages II and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser- 
vice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
games, ready to assist fans who are 
injured or become ill. More, page 6... 

NEW TEACHER evaulations are being 
drawn up for the Arts and Sciences 
professors. See page A.. 



DIMENSIONS 



I V 



.3 STATE : ry 

TOPEKA, KS 66(43 EXCH 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December H, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol.85, No. 72 






Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3.5 10,637," Cross said. 
"We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 

building" 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days lor 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November 1980, 
Cross said. 



Vance attempts to spark 



bhllttle diplomacy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt <AP)— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Uslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



occiwa rsrrx 



"\ 



Creativity: 'Being Mentally Untied 9 



All his life, David Greusel has been 
drawing pictures when he should have 
been taking notes. 

Greusel, a fifth year student in ar- 
chitecture, said he was drawing Bat- 
man on his homework papers as far 
back as fourth grade. Now he is the 
editorial cartoonist for the K-State 
Collegian. 

Greusel considers himself a critic of 
everything. He evaluates all the things 
around him, including the academic 
experience and the way people react to 
each other. His criticisms, he said, 
come out in his cartoons. 

"Almost anything can be the source 
of an editorial cartoon," Greusel said. 
"Sometimes I see things on campus and 
I laugh out loud. These things usually 
end up in cartoons." 

His ideas are crystal ized before he 
ever puts anything down on paper, he 
said, so he is almost always satisfied 
when he finishes a cartoon. To him; the 
most important thing about his car- 
toons is the thoughts they convey, 

"They generally have a lot of literary 
content. An illiterate looking at them 
couldn't laugh just from what he sees in 
the picture,"he said. 

As a professional, Greusel prides 
himself on being able to draw a funny 
cartoon every day of the week whether 
he is feeling funny or not. 

"I can't afford to wake up in the 

morning and say, 'I'm not feeling funny 

today, so I won't do a cartoon,'" he 

\ \ said. 

4 Greusel's artwork is not limited to 



editorial cartoons, however. He 
designed the covers for the 1977, 1978 
and 1979 Royal Purples, and did the 
artwork inside each. 

In Kansas City this past summer, 
Greusel got his first introduction to the 
microphone and dark lights version of 
doing a night club comedy routine. 

The first night he did the routine, he 
came on when the band was taking a 
break. The audience was totally un- 
prepared for a comedian, he said, and 
at first they didn't pay much attention 
to him. But after a while, they quieted 
down, the clinking of glasses stopped, 
and when he was done, everybody 
clapped. Greusel said he was euphoric. 

"There is something very sexual 
about doing comedy. It builds up and 
builds up, and you're just totally wasted 
afterward," he said. 

"The best thing about comedy is how 
others react to it," Greusel said. 

"Comedy is a two-fold thing. I like 
getting applause or a laugh, but I also 
like knowing I can make people go out 
with a little bigger smile than they had 
when they came in. 

"My personal philosophy puts en- 
tertainment before drama. To me, it's 
more important to be entertained than 
enlightened," he said. 

This philosophy carries over into 
another aspect of GreusePs en- 
tertaining—his impersonations. 

In the fourth grade, Greusel heard his 
voice on a tape recorder for the first 
time, and he says he didn't like it. He 
immediately began looking for other 



By Susan Brink 



ways to talk. He is now able to imitate 
about 40 voices. 

Greusel said the art of impersonation 
amounts to capturing the essential 
diction of the person he's imitating. 
Once that is done, the tone of the voice 
he uses doesn't matter very much. 

Criticism doesn't bother Greusel. In 
fact, he said he sometimes likes it. 

"One of my biggest complaints of 
show business is that people never tell 
you what they really think. When 
criticism is accurate and gets to the 
point, I really enjoy it," he said. 

Greusel had a part as the starkeeper, 
an employee of heaven, in the musical, 
"Carousel," which was presented last 
month in McCain Auditorium. The 
character had a sort of omniscient point 
of view, staying mostly on the sidelines 
smoking a pipe. Greusel said he sees 
that character as being much like 
himself. 

"I can't be categorized as a car- 
toonist, a jock, an actor, or a dormie, 
for example, because I have so many 
other things. I like it that way, ' ' he said. 

The reason he likes being a little 
different than other people, he said, is 
because he was once told the truly 
creative person isn't like everyone else 
and doesn't really want to be. 

"Creativity is not letting yourself be 
confined. You can't be bound by in- 
confidence," he said. "Creativity is 
nothing more than being mentally 
untied, and that boils down to never 
saying, ican't.'" 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobe I Prize with him . 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document a nd that " if and when " it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an., Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace. " 

♦est ends 
nee in Iran 

t six -hour procession. The official Iranian 
jws agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
jt said the march was in honor of World 
liman Rights Day, which was Sunday. 

THE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
inners and placards, many written in 
nglish for the benefit of foreign journalists 
nd television cameras. One placard 
fudely written in chalk demanded 
Yankees Go Home!" University students 
topped reporters, demanding they "tell 
ipimy Carter we want democracy and not a 
dyal tyrant." 

Westerners, especially Americans, have 
ecome the symbol of foreign support for 
bah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
fest hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
t some 9.000 foreigners, including about 
,000 Americans. 

President Carter has repeatedly stressed 
upporl for the shah, but the State Depar- 
ment has said the United States will not 
dtervene. State Department spokesman 
lary Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 
urate to describe the exodus as an 
'evacuation" and that between 35.000 and 
lUXXJ Americans are still in [ran . 

No blood was spilled," an official of 
lanjaby's National Front said of the march. 
Today we proved that the opposition is 
Lore than just a bunch of hotheads and 
fissidents, as the shah's people claim. The 
nessage we sent to the palace today cannot 
le ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
iloodbath." 

In Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
spiritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
vmbol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
he march to be "an absolute success... It 
■howed the shah has little support left," an 
ntie to Khomaini said. 

The religious leader has called on 
ranians to spill their blood until the 59-year- 
>ld shah is ousted. 

Before the march began, thousands of the 
(See VIOLENCE, p. 2> 



nside 



■ 



THE WILDCATS racked up another 
win Saturday night against Cat Poly- 
Pomona. See game details and pictures, 
pages 11 and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser- 
vice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
games, ready to assist fans who are 
injured or become IH. More, page 8... 

NEW TEACHER emulations are being 
drawn up tor the Arts and Sciences 
professors. See page A.. 



December 1978 



KANSAS BTATE HI! L SOCIEIt 

TOPEKA, KS 66012 ;;| 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December 11, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol.85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637," Cross said. 
"We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to trie main 
building." 

Flans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November 1980, 
Cross said, 



Vance attempts to spark 



bhUttle CliplOmaCy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt (AP)— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
alter talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Mam, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir. praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an. Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 



moooiwa ~-otest ends 







A Squad With 'The Bug' 



Two years ago the Department of 
Speech 'decided to start a program in 
individual events. Lynne Ross, in- 
structor in speech and one of the 
coaches for Speech Unlimited, the 
individuals events squad, said the 
coaches thought they might get five or 
six students. They had 15. 

Last year the K-State squad was third 
in the nation behind the University of 
Southern California and Eastern 
Michigan. . 

Ross said she thought the squad 
might be down this year because there 
were only three people returning, but 
she said the squad is really blossoming 
and she and Coach Harold Nichols, 
assistant professor in speech, have a 
core of 25 hard-working students this 
year 



10 



Squad members compete in several 
different individual events These 
events are divided into two 
classifications: public speaking and 
interpretive events. Public speaking 
events include informative, im 
promptu, after dinner and ex- 
temporaneous speaking, and oration. 
The interpretive events are prose, 
poetry, dramatic interpretation and 

dramatic duo. 
In the rhetorical criticism category, 

the participants analyze the persuasion 

techniques used in a speech. 
For a down year, the K State squad is 

doing well having placed at several 

tournaments during the fall semester. 

K-Slate won six of nine events at a 

tournament in Omaha and Ross said. 

"Wekilled that tournament." 



By Kelly Swofford 
and Chris Baumchen 

So, to what does Ross attribute the 
success of the program? She said the K- 
State program is attractive to the in- 
dividual who competed in high school 
and "has the bug." 

"You do get some individual 
recognition for talent. It's very com- 
petitive and it's for people who enjoy 
the challenge of competing and win- 
ning " 

Ross also credits a strong forensics 

program in Kansas high schools for 
stimulating interest. 

Ross said few universities field both a 
competitive debate and individual 
. 'vents squad She said at most 
universities in the state, debate comes 
first and if students want to compete in 
individual events, they probably will 
have to debate. 

DIMENSIONS 



nee in Iran 

e six -hour procession. The official Iranian 
ws agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
[i said the march was in honor of World 
iman Rights Day, which was Sunday. 

THE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 

mners and placards, many written in 

hglish for the benefit of foreign journalists 

td television cameras. One placard 
fudeJy written in chalk demanded 
Yankees Go Home!" University students 
upped reporters, demanding they "tell 
in i my Carter we want democracy and not a 
jyal tyrant." 

Westerners, especially Americans, have 
ecome the symbol of foreign support for 
hah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
test hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
f some 9,000 foreigners, including about 
,000 Americans. 

President Carter has repeatedly stressed 
upport for the shah, but the State Depar- 
ment has said the United States will not 
ntervene. State Department spokesman 
nary Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 
urate to describe the exodus as an 
'evacuation" and that between 35,000 and 
o.OOOAmericansarestillinlran. . 

"No blood was spilled," an official of 
lanjaby's National Front said of the march. 
Today we proved that the opposition is 
nore than just a bunch of hotheads and 
jissidents, as the shah's people claim. The 
nessage we sent to the palace today cannot 
le ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
iloodbath." 

In Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
spiritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
symbol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
fie march to be "an absolute success.. .It 
ihowed the shah has little support left," an 
Ude to Khomaini said. 

The religious leader has called on 
banians to spill their blood until the 59-year- 
ildshah is ousted. 

Before the march began, thousands of the 
(Set' VIOLENCE, p. 2) 



nside 






THE WILDCATS racked up another 
win Saturday night against Cat Poly 
Pomona. See game details and pictures, 
pages 11 and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser- 
vice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
games, ready to assist fans who are 
injured or become ill. More, page 8... 

NEW TEACHER evaulations are being 
drawn up for the Arts and Sciences 
professors. See page 6.. 



I 



»A3 STATE HIS! . L :: U 
TOWKA, KS 66&12 ;;i 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December 11, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol.85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637," Cross said. 
"We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building " 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should lie done around November 1980, 
Cross said. 



Vance attempts to spark 



bhUttle QiplOmaCy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt <AP)— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an. Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 



Macciuo nrntgst GndS 



! 



> • 




TOP: Linda Treiber practices 
her poetry interpretations, "A 
Collection of Four Poems." 
BOTTOM: Bob Holcomb 
practices an informative 
speech he uses for competition 
about the Muppets, 



Here at K-State, Ross said the 
department had recognized the real 
desire on the students' part for the 
individual events squad. 

Dave Proctor, graduate in speech, 
saw individual events as a way to 
continue active competition. 

"I debated at a junior college, but I 
knew 1 wasn't going to have the time to 
debate here," he said. "I wanted to 
compete. I liked it, so I joined Speech 
Unlimited." 

Proctor was the first president of the 
squad and is now an assistant coach. 

Linda Treiber, sophomore in theater, 
competes in the interpretive events. 

"It gives me a chance to keep up on 
my reading of literature and plays and 
gives me a chance to act and get helpful 
feedback from judges," she said. 
"Those opinions help me improve." 

"I feel like I'm learning 
something— learning how to talk, to 
persuade, to sell myself," Bob 
Holcomb, junior in business and 
current squad president, said. "If I 
don't do it, it seems like I'm missing out 
on something." 

Holcomb was involved in forensics in 
high school. 




"This may sound arrogant, but I'm 
good at it. And I like winning," he hM. 
"It feeds my ego." 

But most of the squad members think 
it's fun. "If it weren't for the friends t 
have in the squad and the fun we haw 
together, I doubt if I would stay in it," 
Holcomb said. 

Ross said Speech Unlimited is ■ 
cohesive group. "You want to do it 
because other people like you are doing 
it." 

She credits membership in the squad 
with the development of two romances 
and eventual marriages. 

To achieve national recognition, 
squad members dedicate a lot of time to 
perfecting their performances. For 
those involved in public speaking, the 
task begins with writing a speech. Time 
must be given to initial research before 
the writing process begins. 

"I usually have to rewrite my speech 
two or three times before the coaches 
will accept it," Holcomb said. 

Once the speech is written and ac- 
cepted, it must be memorized. Included 
in the memorization are sublet ies such 
as voice inflections and gestures. 

"It is important to put across the 
exact message you intended," Holcomb 
said. All movements and inflections 
must look spontaneous, even though 
they are rehearsed, he said. 

Most of the practice is done with the 
coaches' supervision. Ross coaches the 
public speaking events and Nichols 
coaches the interpretive events. 

"You can't begin to say what they 
have done for the squad and how much 
work they have put in," Holcomb said. 

The squad's success at the national 
level has brought attention to K -Stale 
from other universities across the 
nation. 

"A lot of eastern schools who don't 
necessarily know K State from our 
athletic program, respect us for our 
squad," Holcomb said. "We hold our 
own in national competition. We are not 
humiliated and the university is net 
humiliated." 



nee in Iran 

e six-hour procession. The official Iranian 
ws agency estimated the crowd at 400,000. 
It said the march was in honor of World 
jman Rights Day, which was Sunday. 

THE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
mners and placards, many written in 
nglish for the benefit of foreign journalists 
id television cameras. One placard 
judely written in chalk demanded 
Vankees Go Home!" University students 
lipped reporters, demanding they "tell 
immy Carter we want democracy and not a 
jy a I tyrant." 

Westerners, especially Americans, have 
etome the symbol of foreign support for 
hah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
rest hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
f some 9,000 foreigners, including about 
,000 Americans. 

President Carter has repeatedly stressed 
upport for the shah, but the State Depar- 
ment has said the United States will not 
ntervene. State Department spokesman 
flary Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 
urate to describe the exodus as an 
^evacuation" and that between 35,000 and 
0,000 Americans an- still in Iran 
"No blood was spilled," an official of 
ianjaby's National Front said of the march. 
Today we proved that the opposition is 
noie than just a bunch of hotheads and 
fcssidents, as the shah's people claim. The 
nessage we sent to the palace today cannot 
** ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
iloodbath." 

In Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
tpiritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
lymbol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
he march to be "an absolute success... It 
ihowed the shah has little support left," an 
ude to Khomaini said. 

The religious leader has called on 
Iranians to spill their blood until the 59-year- 
>ld shah is ousted. 
Before the march began, thousands of the 
(See VIOLENCE, p. 2 > 



inside 



THE WILDCATS racked up another 
win Saturday night against Cai Poly- 
Pomona. See game details and pictures, 
pages 11 and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser- 
vice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
games, ready to assist fans who are 
injured or become ilf. More, page 8... 

NEW TEACHER evaulations are being 
drawn up for the Arts and Sciences 
professors. See page 6.. 



December 1978 



11 



v. 



KANSAS STATE IIIS1 . :. s :: W 
TOWKA, K8 66612 (ju 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December 11, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637/' Cross said. 
' 'We're going to be able to pick up several 
features In addition to the main 
building.'" 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November 1980, 
Cross said. 



bflUttlB diplomacy." stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt lAP)— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir 's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Mam, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt ani. Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 



Overachievers 



It's All a 

Matter 
of 

Priorities 



They are the overachievers, 
the people who 

easily could have been hated 

except for a certain 

charismatic charm that 

draws the very ones who might 

despise them, to them. 

In their own rights* they are enigmas. 



By Beccy Tanner 



In high school they were the ones who 
easily could have been hated. They 
were the types who were cheerlead- 
ders, drum majorettes, played in the 
band, belonged to Future Homemakers 
of America, mixed chorus, 4-H and 
were in the Junior -Senior Play. 

Their peers didn't really mind that 
they were in those activities, but they 
were the types who had to be leading 
the whole she-bang. They were the 
presidents of every organization in- 
cluding the class and student body. 
They were the types who maintained a 
4.0 grade point average, played first 
chair saxaphone, won all the 
scholarships and still had time to sing 
each Sunday in the Methodist church 
choir. 

They are the overachievers, the 
people who easily could have been 
hated except for a certain charismatic 
charm that draws the very ones who 
might despise them, to them. In their 
own rights, they are enigmas. 

Many are still in high schools 
throughout the country. And come 
graduation, will give small tributes to 
the people who made it possible for 
their overachievements. But it's those 



12 



who have gone on, and are either 
holding down successful jobs of their 
own or who are attending universities 
and raking in awards and organizations 
at K-State — those are the people this 
story deals with. 

By some people's standards Pat 
Nelson of Newark, Del., may not be 
labeled an overachiever. Indeed, she 
has not won a Nobel Peace Prize or 
chatted with Idi Amin and Henry 
Kissinger. But, at age 36, she has 
realized most of her ambitions. 

She graduated from St. John High 
School in 1960 and from K -State in 1964 
with a degree in Home Economics. In 
1968 she received a masters degree 
from the University of Michigan in 
Family and Child Development and in 
1977 she recceived her doctorate from 
Columbia University in New York. In 
the meantime she has held various 
teaching positions throughout the 
country and managed to raise a family. 

"I don't think of myself as an 
overachiever. When I think of an 
overachiever I automatically think of 
Helen Keller or George Washington 
Carver," Nelson said. "To me, an 
overachiever is someone who has had 



to overcome tremendous odds. 1 think 
there are few people in this world who 
are overachievers, or who could be 
labeled as such. 

"If there had to be any highpoint or 
moment I was particularly proud of any 
of my accomplishments, I think it 
would have been in high school when I 
passed freshman physical education 
and I was a junior. No, actually I think 
the most important goal for me has 
been to maintain my career and still 
manage a family." 

According to Nelson, her life is 
scheduled. She wakes at 4 each or- 
ning and plans her day as precisely as 
possible— minute by minute. 

"I've got to have my lists. It lets me 
know what needs to be done and how 
much time I reasonably have to do it. 
Sometimes, I may vary from it, but it 
gives me an idea of things to come," 
she said. 

Robert Sinnett, psychologist at 
Lafene Student Health says the term 
"overachiever" is often misun- 
derstood. Certain types of people may 
excel, he said, but the often neglect 
some parts of their lives. 

"Basically we live in a pretty com- 

DIMENSIONS 



i 



*test ends 
nee in Iran 



, 



six -hour procession. The official Iranian 
•ws agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
jt said the march was in honor of World 
uman Rights Day, which was Sunday. 

THE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
jnners and placards, many written in 
inglish for the benefit of foreign journalists 
in! television cameras. One placard 
rudely written in chalk demanded 
Yankees Go Home!" University students 
tupped reporters, demanding they "tell 
bri my Carter we want democracy and not a 
jyai tyrant ." 

Westerners, especially Americans, have 
ecome the symbol of foreign support for 
hah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
fest hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
f some 9.000 foreigners, including about 
,ooo Americans. 

President Carter has repeatedly stressed 
upport for the shah, but the State Depar- 
ii ion I has said the United States will not 
ntervene. State Department spokesman 
rtary Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 
urate to describe the exodus as an 
'evacuation" and that between 35,000 and 
0,000 Americans are still in Iran. - 
"No blood was spilled," an official of 
ianjaby's National Front said of the march. 
[Today we proved that the opposition is 
nore than just a bunch of hotheads and 
bssidents, as the shah's people claim. The 
nessage we sent to the palace today cannot 
e ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
loodbath." 

In Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
spiritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
lymbol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
|>e march to be "an absolute success.. .It 
ihowed the shah has little support left," an 
ink' to Khomaini said. 
The religious leader has called on 
ranians to spill their blood until the 59-year- 
lid shah is ousted. 
Before the march began, thousands of the 
(SeeVIOLENCE.p.2) 



Inside 



THE WILDCATS racked up another 
win Saturday night against Cat Poly- 
Pomona. See game details and pictures, 
pages 11 and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser- 
vice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
games, ready to assist fans who are 
injured or become ill. More, page 8... 

NEW TEACH ERevaulations are being 
drawn up for the Arts and Sciences 
professors. See page 4. . 



■ STATE 41 • ' ; ./ 

TOKKA, KS 66612 | ;;j 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December! 1, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol.85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Pinal plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637," Cross said. 
"We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building." 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November 1980, 
Cross said. 



Shuttle diplomacy: SK 



CAIRO, Egypt <AP>— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir s funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an. Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 




«petitive society. And in this society we 
have people who stand out. They like to 
achieve in areas that interest them," 
Sinnett said. "It is unfortunate, though, 
because some of these people will often 
neglect things. And sometimes, they 
will end up leading very narrow, 
sheltered lives." 

But, Sinnett said, not all 
overachievers limit themselves to just 
one occupation or field. Sometimes, he 
said, there will be people who do well in 
all areas of their lives. 

"You occasionally do find a few who 
are the all-star types, that is, they do 
better than you would expect them to do 
on the basis of tests. But for the most 
part, overachievers usually will invest 
an awful lot of time and make personal 
sacrifices for things they deem as 
important. And sometime they will 
sacrifice personal relationships." 

Sue Livingston, senior in modern 
languages, and Shari Hildebrand, 
senior in home economics, are both 
considered, by friends, to be 
overachievers. And, they too, consider 
themselves to be achievers. 

As a former K -State ambassador and 
president and member of several 
campus organizations, Hildebrand said 
although she may consider herself an 
achiever, she is not an overachiever. 

"No, I don't think of myself as an 
overachiever. 1 do accomplish a lot of 
things, but it's because I have set 
certain goals and priorities. I make 
myself do things," Hildebrand said. "I 
certainly don't think of myself as an 
overachiever... but I do know there are 
a lot of underachievers." 

Both Hildebrand and Livingston say 
it's important for people to recognize 
their own talents and capabilities. 
Livingston is presently one of K-State's 
ambassadors. 

"I think we all have our priorities, 
our likes and dislikes. I accomplish 
things, first of all because I want to help 
people, and secondly, because I am 
interested in them, I have a curiosity," 
Livingston said. "Everyone has their 
own capabilites, their own talents. 

"I am an overachiever; I like to think 
positive about myself. And I like for the 
people I come in contact with to think 
i * positive a bout themselves, ' ' she said . 
Overachievers. They are the types 
who seem to stand out, do exceptionally 
well. What distinguishes them from 
normal, ordinary people? 

They are the types who have their 
goals and their priorities down to 
specifics. Each minute, each day of 
their lives is planned. 



December 1978 




Maeeive nrntg$t ends 

nee in Iran 



it 1 six-hour procession. The official Iranian 
jws agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
it said the march was in honor of World 
uinan Rights Day, which was Sunday. 

THE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
snners and placards, many written in 
mglish for the benefit of foreign journalists 
nil television cameras. One placard 
rudely written in chalk demanded 
Yankees Go Home!" University students 
bopped reporters, demanding they "tell 
in itny Carter we want democracy and not a 
Hyal tyrant." 

Westerners, especially Americans, have 
ecome the symbol of foreign support for 
fcah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
Vest hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
f some 9,000 foreigners, including about 
,000 Americans. 

President Carter has repeatedly stressed 
upport for the shah, but the State Depar- 
mem has said the United States will not 
otervene. Slate Department spokesman 
lary Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 
urale to describe the exodus as an 
'evacuation" and that between 35,000 and 
O.OOOAmericansarestillinlran. - 
"No blood was spilled," an official of 
ianjaby 's National Front said of the march. 
"Today we proved that the opposition is 
nuie than just a bunch of hotheads and 
Bssidents, as the shah's people claim. The 
nessage we sent to the palace today cannot 
K ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
tloodbath." 

In Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
tpiritual head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
tymbol of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
he march to be "an absolute success. ..It 
snowed the shah has little support left," an 
|ide to Khomaini said. 

The religious leader has called on 
Iranians to spill their blood until the 59-year- 
>)d shah is ousted. 
Before the march began, thousands of the 
(See VIOLENCE, p. 2) 



nside 



THE WILDCATS racked up another 
win Saturday night against Cal Poly 
Pomona. See game details and pictures, 
pages 11 and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser- 
vice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
games, ready to assist fans who are 
Injured or become ill. More, page 8... 






NEW TE ACHE Revaluations are being 
drawn up for the Arts and Sciences 
professors. See page 6.. 



13 






KANSAS STATE lilt . : .:. ? ; i { 
TOKKA, KS C. £v C ;i 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December! 1, 1978 
Kansas State University 

Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol.85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637," Cross said. 
"We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building." 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November 1960, 
Cross said. 



ohUttl6 QiplOnidCyi stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt (API— Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an*. Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace," 



I 



Maceiuft ~-~*3st ends 



I 



1 am a dancer. A dancer dances' 



Dixie Kuklinski is a dancer and her 
eyes sparkle when she tells you she 
wants to perform in New York some 
day. 

But before that day comes, it's just a 
matter of establishing whether her 
mind controls her body or her body 
controls her mind. 

"It's a challenge to find the extremes 
to which the body can go," Kuklinski 
said. She spent last Christmas in bed 
with mononucleosis from pushing too 
hard, but says she is moving to a point 



where she has control over her body. 

As a dancer, Kuklinski said there is 
no relaxation, "Your time is your 
body's time." Dance is not a 9 to 5 job, 
because there are classes, rehearsals, 
practices and performances and then 
the cycle begins again. 

Dance is a form of expression for 
Kuklinski. 

"I'm not on an ego trip but 1 want to 
be an entertainer. I like to be the center 
of attraction and let out all my 
feelings." 



By Chris Baumchen 

The different styles of dance give 
Kuklinski, a sophomore in dance, the 
mechanisms to do that, "With ballet, 
it's more controlled. There's a specific 
expression and a way to look . 

"But with tap and jazz, it's more of a 
relaxed feeling, you can be happy and 
share your feelings with others." 

Kuklinski admits dance is very im- 
portant to her but she's quick to point 
out she has other interests. "Dance is 
important and I couldn't live without it, 
but it's just like I couldn't live without 




When Dixie Kuklinski teaches dance, she tries to 
teach more than just movement. She wants her 



14 



students to know which muscles they are using 
and how their movements relate to space. 

DIMENSIONS 



nee in Iran 



six-hour procession. The official Iranian 
* agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
said the march was in honor of World 
tan Rights Day, which was Sunday. 

IE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
lers and placards, many written in 
lish for the benefit of foreign journalists 
. television cameras. One placard 
fely written in chalk demanded 
nkees Go Home!" University students 
t>cd reporters, demanding they "tell 
ny Carter we want democracy and not a 
I tyrant." 

ssterners, especially Americans, have 
me the symbol of foreign support for 
Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
ime 9,000 foreigners, including about 
Americans. 

ssident Carter has repeatedly stressed 

)rt for the shah, but the State Depar- 

. I has said the United States will not 

/ene. State Department spokesman 

Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 

e to describe the exodus as an 

:uation" and that between 35,000 and 

Americans are still in Iran. 

< blood was spilled," an official of 

by's National Front said of the march. 

y we proved that the opposition is 

than just a bunch of hotheads and 

Nits, as the shah's people claim. The 

ge we sent to the palace today cannot 

iored. He has to listen or risk a 

ath." 

aris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
mI head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
I of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
irch to be "an absolute success... It 
I the shah has little support left," an 
Khomaini said. 

religious leader has called on 
s to spill their blood until the 59-year 
i is ousted. 

e the march began, thousands of the 
(See VIOLENCE, p. 2) 



de 



WILDCATS racked up another 
iturday night against Cat Poly- 
a. See game details and pictures, 
land 13... 

N WHILE, the Emergency Ser- 
lit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
ready to assist fans who are 
or become ill, More, page 8... 

TEACHER evaulat ions are being 
up for the Arts and Sciences 
Irs. See page A,. 



»AS BTATE II ) l S0C1 I I 

'10K-KA, KS 66612 EXCH 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December IT, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol.85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities. 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,5 10,637," Cross said. 
"We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building." 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the state and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November I960, 
Cross said. 



Vance attempts to spark 



ohUttlB Diplomacy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt (AP) -Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
alter talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Uslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the award on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
document and that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an>. Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 



[ 







MB M 



■■ 



i « 









( 



. V 



# 



i 

r 
P 

a 



MacciuA •*-~*9st ends 




sewing or communication. If I didn't 
tale dance 1 wouldn't have the others. 
Dance is just a form of self expression 
like the others." 

Kuklinski says she is at a transition 
ooint. "To be a professional, you have 
toTve dance. I'm too old to be with a 

C °Bu P t a Kuklinski does want to work with 
a company and she sees arts ad- 
ministration as an option. She said she 
could be involved with the company in a 
public relations or management 
capacity and still dance. 

However, New York is »tdl 
beckoning. She has contemplated 
applying for an airline stewardess 
pSfion so she could use thai jnb a« i a 
means to get to New \ork or an 
audition. U it works she will have 
gained experience performing in the h 
big city and if it doesn't she says, I will 

have lost nothing." . 

Kuklinski, who began dancing at , t 
three, teaches at a studio and tries to 
impress upon her students that dance is 

more than just movement. When l 
teach I try to explain what we re doing , 
how a particular movement relates to 
space, why it's important and what 
muscles ol the body are used when we , 
do that movement. 

She sees a growing pubhc interest in 
dance because it's something that can 
£ as entertaining as an athletic event ( 
but not as brutal. "People are realizing 
it takes muscle control to be a dancer. A 
leap in the air compares to a hook- 

c 1 1 f *' 

* People are finding dance is more than 
just ballet. It involves movement and 
self expression, she said. For Kuklmsk 
that self-expression and release ol 
feelingsareimportant. 

"I can go in to dance and be mad and 
come out relaxed. In those leaps across 
the floor I step on everybody 1 hate, 



TmZu sees much of her time as her body's time as the cycle of 
prance tarsal and performance cont.ni*.. 






nee in Iran 



six-hour procession. The official Iranian 
b agency estimated the crowd at 400.000, 
said the march was in honor of World 
9an Rights Day, which was Sunday 

iE PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
iters and placards, many written in 
Hsh for the benefit of foreign journalists 
television cameras. One placard 
(ely written in chalk demanded 
nkees Go Home!" University students 
ped reporters, demanding they "tell 
ny Carter we want democracy and not a 
1 tyrant.'' 

sslerners, especially Americans, have 
me the symbol of foreign support for 
Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
ime 9,000 foreigners, including about 
Americans. 

isident Carter has repeatedly stressed 

jrl for the shah, but the State Depar- 

t has said the United States will not 

/ene. State Department spokesman 

Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 

e to describe the exodus as an 

:uation" and that between 35,000 and 

Americans are still in Iran. . 

i blood was spilled," an official of 

by s National Front said of the march. 

y we proved that the opposition is 

than just a bunch of hotheads and 

»nts, as the shah's people claim. The 

ge we sent to the palace today cannot 

lored. He has to listen or risk a 

ath." 

aris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
al head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
I of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
irch to be "an absolute success. ..It 
1 the shah has little support left." an 
Khomaini said. 

religious leader has called on 
is to spill their blood until the 59-year- 
i is ousted. 

e the march began, thousands of the 
(See VIOLENCE, p. 2) 



de 



WILDCATS racked up another 
iturday night against Cat Poly- 
a. See game details and pictures, 

land 13... 

N WHILE, the Emergency Ser- 
iit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
ready to assist fans who are 
or become ill. More, page 8... 

TE ACH E R evaula t ions are being 
up for the Arts and Sciences 
>rs. See page 6.. 



15 



December 1978 



KANSAS STATE :.: L SOCIETY 

TOKKA, KS 66012 £XC | 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December II, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Final plans for the student recreation 
complex were approved Friday with 
some additional features included, ac- 
cording to Gene Cross, associate vice 
president for University Facilities, 

"As of Dec. 15, funds available for the 
complex total $3,510,637," Cross said. 
"We're going to be able to pick up several 
features in addition to the main 
building." 

Plans call for 16 handball courts, as 
originally planned, and the running 
track, Cross said. 

The plans now have to be approved by 
the slate and Cross said contracting for 
the project should take place in January. 

The contract will allow 650 days for 
work to be completed, so the building 
should be done around November 1980, 
Cross said. 



Vance attempts to spark 



bhUttlB Diplomacy! stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO, Egypt <AP> —Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance began a new round of shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try to break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting for 90 minutes with Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
after the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
to send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
former Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir. 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Butros Ghali before flying 
to Israel for Meir's funeral Tuesday. He had 
expected to end his Mideast trip Wednesday 
after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prime 
Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir's death 
has caused a day's extension. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the funeral 
were not known. The State Department said 
he might return here for more talks with 
Sadat. 

As Vance and Sadat met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 
Peace Prize, which he and Sadat shared for 
their peace efforts. Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Sayed Ahmed 
Marei, a top aide, to read a speech and 
accept the a ward on his behalf. 

In the speech, Sadat pledged to pursue 
"the road to peace" and said Egypt will 
' 'spare no effort, we will not tire or despair, 
we will not lose faith" in the peace process. 
But he also said a "moment of truth" has 
arrived that requires both sides to "take a 
new look at the situation." 

Begin, in his acceptance speech in Oslo, 



paid tribute to Meir, praised President 
Carter for his "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 
the Nobel Prize with him. 

He said the proposed treaty was a "good" 
documentand that "if and when" it is signed 
a new era of "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Mideast. 

U.S. OFFICIALS said it was not known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative to Israel with Vance. 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" of his 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion of the discussions 
between Egypt an. Israel as an important 
step on the road toward a comprehensive 
and lasting peace." 



: * 



Maccive nrntest ends 

ice in Iran 



Creativity is a visit from the unexpected, a 
waltz with death, an application for a patent on 
life, a long distance call to history. It's an effort to 
rent the next century, to buy a piece of tomorrow, 
to quick-freeze time, to whittle off a piece of 
eternity, to clone the spirit. Immortality. 
Creativity also is the scream of the sperm and the 
cry of the egg, one person's lunge out of the 
crowd. The creative act says me, Me, AAE. It's the 
whistle in church, the streak of lightning that 
splits the black sky. It's the sniper's shot at 
recognition, the Lindbergian leap across the 
Atlantic, Chef Hitler's grisly menu from the 
ovens of Buchenwald. And finally creativity is the 
WHY? of it ail, the surgical dissection of the soul, 
the autopsy of the mind. It's the search for the 
seed, the dye that makes blood red, the ribbon of 
electricity that switches nerves on and off, the 
squishy clay of which brains are made. These 
searches are why we wind ourselves up, and 
commit madness and commit beauty. 

—David Hacker 



ix-hour procession. The official Iranian 
, agency estimated the crowd at 400,000, 
aid the march was in honor of World 
an Bights Day, which was Sunday. 

E PROTESTERS carried thousands of 
ers and placards, many written in 
fsh for the benefit of foreign journalists 
television cameras. One placard 
.ely written in chalk demanded 
«nkees Go Home!" University students 
led reporters, demanding they "tell 
tiy Carter we want democracy and not a 
I tyrant." 

estei ners. especially Americans, have 
jne the symbol of foreign support for 
i Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, and anti- 
t hostility has touched off a mass exodus 
ome 9,000 foreigners, including about 
rAmericans. 

*sident Carter has repeatedly stressed 
lort for the shah, but the State Depar- 
•nt has said the United States will not 
-vene. State Department spokesman 
y Ann Bader said Sunday it was inac- 
ite to describe the exodus as an 
icualion" and that between 35,000 and 
)OAmericansarestillinIran. . 
Vo blood was spilled," an official of 
Jaby's National Front said of the march, 
day we proved that the opposition is 
,-e than just a bunch of hotheads and 
idenls, as the shah's people claim. The 
isage we sent to the palace today cannot 
ignored. He has to listen or risk a 
jdbath." 

» Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khomaini, 
•ituaJ head of Iran's Moslem sect and 
iboi of the anti-shah movement, deemed 
•march to be "an absolute success... It 
wed the shah has little support left," an 
e to Khomaini said. 

tie religious leader has called on 
nians to spill their blood until the 59-year - 
shah is ousted. 

Jefore the march began, thousands of the 
(See VIOLENCE, p. 2) 



iside 



THE WILDCATS racked up another 
An Saturday night against Cat Poly 
tomona. See game details and pictures, 
■ages 11 and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser- 
'ice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at all 
tames, ready to assist fans who are 
n j ured or become ill. More, page 8. . , 

NEW TEACHER evaulations are being 
Jrawn up for the Arts and Sciences 

>ro lessors. See page 6.. 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Monday 

December 11, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 

Vol.85, No. 72 



Rec complex 
gets OK 

Emu I plans for the studenl recreation 
dimple* were approved Eridaj wilh 
Mime additional features included, ac 
curding in Gene Cross, associate vice 
president lor University Facilities. 

\s Hi Dec is. funds available for the 
complex Uilal S;:.Miu.:iY. ' Cross said 

We trailing lube able li» pick Up several 

matures iii addition In Ihe in. mi 
building " 

plans call for if. handball courts, as 
originally planned, and flit- running 
track, Cross said 

The plans now have in tie approved bj 
i in- slate and Cross said contracting For 
tin- project should take place in .January. 

The contract will allow ItSti days for 
work in l>e cinnpk'led, so the building 
should bt' Jinn' around Noveniber 1980, 
i Toss said 



Shuttle diplomacy: 



Vance attempts to spark 
stalled Mideast treaty 



CAIRO. Kgypt (AF) Secretary ol State 
i \mis Vance began u new round ol shuttle 
diplomacy Sunday to try In break the 
deadlock in the stalled Mideast peace talks, 
meeting tm <m minutes wiih Egyptian 
President Anwar Sadat. 

Neither Vance nor Sadat would comment 
alter the meeting, but there was speculation 
Vance tried to persuade the Egyptian leader 
in send a top-level official to Israel to revive 
direct negotiations between the two coun- 
tries and perhaps attend the funeral of 
tormer Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir 

Vance is to hold another round of talks 
today with Sadat and acting Egyptian 
Foreign Minister Putins Chah before flying 
lo Israel for Meir s funeral Tuesday, fie had 
expected to end bis Mideast trip Wednesday 

after talks in Jerusalem with Israeli Prune 

Minister Menachem Begin, but Meir'a death 
has caused a day's extension. 




by Bo Riirli'f 



Crosswalk collision 

Ambulance attendants Mike Kinsman (left), freshman in pre- 
medicine, and Phil Craig (right) assist 36 year old Benjamin Moore 
jr., 1446 Laramie St., after he was struck by a car while walking 
through the crosswalk at the intersection of Anderson Avenue and 
Mid Campus Drive Sunday night. Moore was taken to St. Mary 
Hospital and was listed in fair condition with a concussion and other 
possible head injuries. Riley County police are investigating the 
accident. 



VANCE'S PLANS for after the Mineral 
were in it known The State Department said 
he might return here lor mure talks with 
Sadat 

As Vance and Sadal met, Begin was in 
Oslo, Norway, to receive the 1978 Nobel 

Peace Prize, which lie and Sadat shared lor 
their peace efforts Sadat decided not to 
attend the ceremony and sent Saved Ahmed 
Marei. a lop aide, to read a Speech and 
accept the award on his behalf 

In the speech. Sadal pledged to pursue 
"the toad (0 peace" and said Egypt will 
"spare no el lull, we will not lire or despair, 

we will not lose faith" in the peace process 

But he also said a 'moment ol truth" lias 
arrived thai requires iiotli sides to '"lake a 
new look at the situation 
Benin, in his acceptance speech in Dslo, 



pant tribute lo Men-, praised President 
Carter for bis "unsparing effort" at Camp 
David, and congratulated Sadat for sharing 

the Nobel Pl'l/.e Willi bill! 

He said the proposed treat) was . 
document and thai d and *hen d is signed 
a new era at "understanding and 
cooperation" will begin in the Midea 

l I.S. (IK PHIALS said it was mil known 
whether Sadat was considering sending a 
representative in Israel with Vance 

In a statement upon his arrival in Cairo, 
Vance said the "common goal" ot bis 
Mideast trip "is a comprehensive peace and 
the early conclusion nt the discussions 
between Egypt an Israel as an important 
step i in the road toward a comprehensive 
and laslmg peace." 



Massive protest ends 
without violence in Iran 



TEJIKAN, ban tAP> Hundreds ol 
thousands ol Iranians surged through Ihe 
heart ul Tehran Sunday in a mammoth antl 
shah protest, a "referendum in thestreets," 
thai ended without the violence many had 
lea red 

Tile great inarch demonstrated thai the 
people waul lo pul an end lot he dictatorial, 
authoritarian and corrupt regime," a kej 
opposition leader, Kanm Sailjaliy, said He 
said ii was "the best evidence that force 
canuoi stopthis national movement 

Kslmiates "l the numtier ol marchers 
varied The army said :u)0,oou paraded along 
i he .. mile route March organizers 
claimed up to J million people look part in 

Plans finalized 
for Meir funeral 

JERUSALEM lAP) Israel paid tribute 
Sinula> h> Uolda Meir. the young nation's 
fourth prime minister and a giaul ol its 
Iniindmg generation. Plans were being 
completed for Tuesday 's stale funeral. 

Sorrow over Mcir's death Friday tinged 
national pride as Prune Minister Menachem 
Begin received the Nobel Peace Prize in a 
cerrniom in Oslo, Norway, broadcast live 
mi Israeli radioaiid television 

Men. mi. died ol complications from 
lymphoma, a disease ui the lymphatic 
glands thai she kepi secret since it was tirst 
diagnosed 15 years age,. 

Accepting ihe Nobej prize he shared with 
Egypt's President Anwar Sadat, Begin 
opened his address by paying homage in 

Men 

"Her blessed memory will live forever m 
Ihe hearts <>l ihe Jewish people and ol all 
peace-loving nations," Begin said The 
audience al Akershus Castle rose sjmn 
laiieniislv tor a moment ul silent tribute to 
Men 

ISRAELI soldiers roped-otf pathways al 

the Knesset parliament building for the 

public In pas its last respects to the woman 
wliii led Israel through live critical years 
and through the devastating 197:; Mideast 
war 

Men's Imih will he m state this morning 
Tuesday's funeral will lie with full military 
honors Burial will be in a section of the 
national cemetery on Jerusalem's Mount 
Mcivl called "The Plot of the Nations 
Ureal " 

A i'i member U.S. delegation headed b> 
Lillian Carter, President Carter's mother. 

was In arn\e M lav It will include Henry 

Kissinger, who as secretary "t state in 1 l i7l 
mediated Ihe tirsl Arab Israeli partial 
peace agreements with Men a government 



the M\ tiuiii procession. The official Iranian 
newsagent-) estimated Ihe crowd al MKMHKJ, 
!m! said the march was in honor oi World 
Human Rights Day, which was Sundas 

THE PltOTESTEKS carried thousands ol 

banners and placards, main written in 
English lor Ihe henelit ol foreign journa 
and tek'Msion cameras i me placard 
, , ndelj YVl 'Men in chalk demanded 

Yankees Co Home' I ruversilj students 
stopped reporter. 1 demanding they "tell 
.iiii.-h i arii r ■■ ■■ * ant democ io1 a 

royal |y i anl 

Westerners, especially Americans, have 
liecorie ihe symtml ol Inreign support for 
shah Mul iminad Keiea Pahlavi. and antl 
West hostility has touched oft ti mass exodus 
nl gome n.niM) Inreigners. including aboul 
."i.lllNl America lis 

president Carter has repeatedls stressed 
support for the shall, i.ut Ihe State Depar- 
tment lias said Ihe I tilled Stales will in it 

intervene state Department spokesman 
Mar) Ann Bader said Sundaj it was mac 

curate 10 describe the exodus its an 

"evacuation" and that between 115,000 and 
4u,uuu Americans are si ill in Iran 

■No blood was spilled," an official of 
Sanjabs 's National Eronl said ol the march. 

"Todav we proved that the opposition is 
more than lust a hunch of hotheads and 
dissidents, as Ihe shah's people claim The 
message we sent to the palace today cannot 

Ik< ignored He has to listen or risk a 
bloodbath 

In Paris, the exiled Ayatullah Khoniami. 
spiritual head nl Iran s Moslem BW t and 
symbol ul the anti shah movement, deemed 
the march lu be an absolute success ii 
showed Ihe shah has hi He support let!, an 
aide lu Khomaimxaid 

The religious leader has called on 
Iranians tn spill their blood until the 59 year 
old shah is ousted 

Before Ihe march began, thousands of Hi*' 
(See VIOLENCE, \i,l) 



nside 



THE WILDCATS racked up another 
win Saturday night against Cat Poly 
Pomona. See game details and pictures, 
pages 11 and 13... 

MEANWHILE, the Emergency Ser 
vice Unit stood on the sidelines, as at alt 
games, ready to assist tans who are 
injured or become ill. More, page 8... 

NEW TEACHERevaulations are being 
drawn up for the Arts and Sciences 
professors See page 6 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon., December 11, 197t 



Violence avoided in Iranian anti-shah protest 



(continued from p. 1) 

shah's imperial troops, backed by tanks, 
withdrew to outer sections of the city to 
avoid provoking a bloody confrontation. But 
troops ringed the downtown area with 
roadblocks, and military helicopters 
whirred above the protesters. 

The long procession ended at Shahyad 
Square, near a lowering white stone 
monument built 12 years ago to com- 
memorate the 25th anniversary of the shah's 
reign. The protesters then streamed away 
before darkness. 

The march was led by its chief organizer, 
Ayatullah Telega hni, 70, and Sanjaby, 71, 
both of whom had been jailed in recent 
months for opposing the shah. 

Mullahs, or Moslem priests, shouted into 
bullhorns to keep up a cacophony of chants. 
Sanjaby was mobbed by followers, and the 
chanting, normally placid women sprinkled 
him with Persian perfume as a sign of 
respect. 

The Tehran march was the biggest street 
demonstration against the shah since his 



foes began the current campaign to oust him 
11 months ago. It underlined how 
widespread and deep-rooted opposition to 
the beleaguered monarch runs in this 
strategic, oil-rich nation. 

The opposition is both religious and 
political. Orthodox Moslems oppose what 
they see as an erosion of traditional Islamic 
values resulting from the shah's Western- 
style modernization programs. Leftists, 
students and a rising middle class oppose 
(he shah's absolute rule. Many in both 
groups want an end to foreign influences 
here. 

THE ARMY had warned that extremists 
planned to infiltrate Sunday's crowds to 
trigger a bloodbath between protesters and 
troops. Iran's military prime minister, Gen. 
Gholam-Reza Azhari, lifted a martial-law 
ban on political processions two days ago to 
allow the march in a bid to avoid bloodshed 

About 60 anti-shah protesters have died in 
clashes with troops since Dec. 2, start of the 
holy month of Moharram, a period chosen 



Cam pus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

KSU POTTER'S GUILD will have a Christmas iatei am 
5pm Thursday and Friday in the Union Courtyard 

APPLICATIONS are being taken though Friday for the 
coordinated undergraduate program in dietetics; see 
Protestor Roach in Justin 107 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL has scheduled the final oral 
defense ot the doctoral dissertation of Cielo Surnayao lor 
today at 9 lism. in Waters 135 

THE GEOLOGY SEMINAR SERIES presents Paul Hot 
(man speaking on Slratigraphic and Structural 
Development ol Aulacogens" at 3 iS pm Tuesday in 
Thompson 101 

MECftA will sponsor a Spanish mass at 6 30 p m Tuesday 
at SI Isidore's; a potluck dinner wilt fotlow. For in 
formation call Janette, 774 7SI* 

TODAY 

RHOMATES will meet at the Alpha Gamma Rho House at 
9pm lor initial ion. please wear dress. 

CHI ALPHA will meet in Union 209 at 7 30 p.m. 

BUMPATHON dancers will meet at Mother's Worry at 5 10 
p m 

CAMPUS SCOUTS will meet in Ford Hall lobby at • IS 
pm beforcgomg carolling 

KSU RODEO CLUB will meet in Wefrer 730 at J 30 p m 



ARTS ANO SCIENCE COUNCIL will meet in Union Jul at 7 
pm 

ALPHA ZETA will meet in the Union Big 8 Room at T p.m. 

CAMPUS HIGH LIFE will meet in Union lot at 7 30 p.m. 

DELTAPSIKAPPAwillmeetinUnion?0*!07etJp.m. 

MANHATTAN HUNGER PROJECT COMMITTEE will 
meet in Union Stateroom? at 11 30 p.m. 

STUDENT DIETZ TIC ASSOCIATION will meet tn Justin's 
parking lot ata IS p.m. to go carolling. 

TUESDAY 
ALPHA CHI SIGMA will meet in King t at 7 p.m. 

FCO INTEREST GROUP will meet in Justin's lounge al« 
pm . bring SI and canned food 

CHIMES will meet at Hibachi Hut at 6 p.m. 

KSU RECREATION CLUB will meet in front ol Aheamat? 
p m logo carolling 

KSU RECREATION CLUB will meel in the conference 
room in the basement ol Moore Hall atB 30 p m 

HORTICULTURE CLUB will meel in the back ot Waters at 
'pm logo carolling 

OELT DARLINGS will have a Christmas parly at the Delta 
1 au Delta House at 9 p.m. 

KSUARH will meel at Smurlhwaile at 7 p.m. 






| GIVE tQOtt FOR CHRISTMAS! 



I 




i 



START YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING TODAY AT KITE'S . 

A. PILSNER GLASS — 75 C (Full of Beer!) 

B. STEIN — 1.50 (Full ol Beer!) 

c. KEY RING-90* 

d 6-PAK FOAM COASTERS -M.50 

e. SCH00NER- $ 375 (ftufatim 

V. PITCHER— $ 3.00 (FullofBeer!) 



You keep a II the glass ware, of course! 
offer good thru final week 

MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT. 



I 




! 

i 

i 



i 



KITES 

y HOME OF THE WILDCATS | 

! "I NEVER KXEW CHRISTMAS SHOPPING COULD BE SUCH FUN!" 1 



by the shah's foes as a decisive one in their 
anti -government campaign. Up to 2,000 
people have been killed this year in anti- 
shah violence. 

The march was held on the eve of Ashura, 
an emotional holy day commemorating the 
martyrdom of the founder of the Shiite sect. 

Teleghani, regarded as Khomaini's top 
representative in Iran, said the huge 



demonstration was called 
fate of the Iranian nation.' 



'to determine the 



Opposition sources claimed huge marches 
also were held Sunday in Mashhad, Tabriz 
and a half-dozen other provincial cities. The 
official news agency said marches were 
held in all of Iran's provinces "to mark the 
religious mourning period." 





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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon., December 11, 1978 



Briefly 



Texas sniper kills 2, eludes police 

IRVING, Texas— Two persons riding in separate cars were killed 
Saturday night by a sniper firing from a bridge over a major high- 
way between Dallas and Fort Worth, police said. The gunman 
escaped. 

The victims were identified as Steven Thomas Gaul den, 12, of 
Piano, who was riding in a car with his parents, and Raymond 
Douglas Andrews, 43, of Arlington. No one else was injured in the 
shootings. 

Police said a rifle bullet pierced the windshield of the Andrews' 
car as it approached the bridge on state highway 183 and struck 
Andrews between the eyes, killing him instantly. His wife, who was 
sitting in the front seat, managed to bring the car to a safe stop, 
police said. 

At about the same time, officers said, the gunman fired at a second 
westbound car, striking young Gaulden in the head. He was 
pronounced dead on arrival at the Hurst-Euless-Bedford Hospital in 
Tarrant County. 

No description of the gunman was available, but police said 
passers-by reported seeing an old yellow car parked near the 
overpass at the time of the shootings. 

One rifle cartridge was found near a highway sign on the bridge, 
police said. 

Bomb threat clears 5,000 from Hays mall 

HAYS— An estimated 5,000 Christmas shoppers were evacuated 
from a large shopping mall Sunday after a telephoned bomb threat 
in this west-central Kansas town. 

A two-hour search by Hays firemen and Ellis County sheriff's 
officers failed to turn up a bomb. 

A call to the manager of "The Mall" shopping center, Roma 
Schramm, was taken by an answering service at about 3:15 p.m. A 
voice described as that of an angry male said there was a bomb 
planted in the 36-store shopping centi-r. 

The call was relayed to Schramm, who called authorities. Officers 
then evacuated the premises and conducted the search. Although 
nothing was found, the businesses stayed closed the rest of the day. 

Schramm estimated lost sales for the afternoon would total as 
much as $100,000. 

The incident remains under investigation by the Hays fire 
department. 

Hot news flashes freeze at KIVA 

FARMINGTON, N.M.— Forecaster Linda Peed didn't have to rely 
on weather instruments to tell KIVA-TV viewers about the cold that 
gripped the mountain community— it was inside. 

The station's heating system failed Friday evening and tem- 
peratures inside the studio plummeted to 3 degrees by the 5:30 p.m. 
news and 1 below zero during the 9 p.m. broadcast. 

Anchorman Richard Draper delivered the news bundled in a 
thermal ski jacket, sportscaster Dale Hansen wore a full-length 
corduroy coat and Peed was wrapped in a double-lined, fur-collared 
coat. 

"Sure is cold in here," Draper said as Peed began her forecast. 

Rut Farmington's Channel 10 newscasters were in good spirits. 
"You think it's cold outside? You should be in here," Draper quipped 
to viewers. 

Waters recede, 10,000 return home 

PAINTSVILLE, Ky— The people of Paintsville moved back to 
town Sunday evening as the water level dropped behind a cracked 
and leaking dam. 

The streets had been deserted for 32 hours before an all-clear 
signal was given at 5 p.m. 

Col. George Richer, district engineer for the Army Corps of 
Engineers, said the water behind the earthen dam, two miles away, 
had dropped 12 feet by Sunday afternoon, making it safe to return. 
He said the Corps would continue monitoring the dam. 

An environmental group, the Kentucky Rivers Coalition, called for 
an independent inspection. 

"It will be a relief to get back home," Eloise Hyden said earlier 
when reached by telephone at Prestonsburg High School, 13 miles 
away. She, her husband and their 12-year-old son were among 66 
people who stayed at the school. 

Hyden said most evacuees had few complaints. "I'm just glad 
everybody got out and that there wasn't a catastrophe," she said. 

The Hydens and about 10,000 others fled the Paintsville area in 
snow and ice Saturday alter the dam, strained by runoff from heavy 
rains, began to leak. 

The Red Cross set up shelters in schools and churches. 



VVeatFer 



Today und Tuesday will be clear to partly cloudy and warmer. 
lli^hs toda> will be in the upper 40s to low 50s. Lows tonight will be in 
Lhe low to mid 20s. Highs Tuesday will be in the mid to upper 50s. 




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Opinions 



Conservation the answer 

As gasoline prices continue to rise and oil companies talk of 
another shortage, consumers need to revise their consumption 
habits or face the consequences of government interference in the 
sale and distribtuion of gasoline: increased prices by way of a large 
federal tax, or gas rationing. 

For several years government officials have considered slapping 
a large tax on gasoline in an effort to force consumers to cut down on 
the use of gasoline. It should send chills up the spine of any consumer 
who visualizes paying $l-plus for a single gallon of gasoline, but the 
constant chatter about increased prices hasn't changed the con- 
sumption habits of America. The people who can afford it will 
continue to buy, but as always Mr. Middle Class and Mr. Lower 
Class will bear the burden. 

Rationing is an equitable way of distributing a scarce resource, 
but only in theory. Many people remember the crime and corruption 
, gas rationing caused durmg World War II, and there is little reason of""Fo"Fc 

[ 1 to thin* ratifining wwf Mia^o the same problems. But more people L" LLC I 3 
will ask for rationing than a higher price because rationing will be 
fairer despite the problems it will cause. 

There is one other solution that will starve off the problem for a 
time— learning to decrease dependence on gasoline. Conservation is 
the only real and conceivable solution to energy problems. People 
should be able to see the problem and change their ways without 
being forced to by threat or intimidation. Their failure to do so shows 
the stupidity of Americans. 




HEv'RE NOT SUPRSED To AWSCTSE BuT H£ &AVS /vtf a ^PEQAl RATt FOR MfcWSlNb 

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Many unanswered questions 
about Iranian conflict 



DOUGLASS DANIEL 
Editorial Editor 



Looking up at man 



What is this noise? 

Did 1 actually read a column by someone 
complaining about the abuses -he suffers 
from being tall? 

Hipley wouldn't believe it. 

Now me, I've got reason to complain. I 
quit growing in eighth grade and it's ob- 
vious. 

Now after six years of being the con- 
noisseur of fine beer, I have a nice spare tire 



Tom Bell 



gracing my waist I've also got bruises 
around my navel from people playing 
"Pillsbury Dough Boy." 

People are always asking me to stand up, 
and I have to make it clear I am already 
standing. They inquire about the finer points 
of dancing with tall girts. 

When I mention hugging my U-month-old 
son, they ask me which one of us has to bend 
over. 

When it's raining, they feel an obligation 
to inform me, thinking I'd be the last to 
know 

They offer to help me get drinks from 
water fountains. They ask me how 1 can see 
to drive. They ask me if I have to stand on a 
stool to get served at a bar 

And yes, they do ask me what it's like to be 
"small" all the lime. 

All of my life, I've had to devise ways to 
cope with this tall world, but I've had help. 

When 1 first began withdrawal from 
puberty, my height was becoming obvious. 
An older, wiser shorty pulled me aside for a 
litUe heart to heart. 

He told me to never think of myself as 
short. He told me to approach every 
situation as if I met the government's 
standards for average height. 

So 1 did. When I walked through doorways 
I would duck. I quit moving my car seat all 
the way to the front. I bought cowboy boots 
so I could use the pointy toes to reach the 
pedals. 



1 threw away my portable stepping-stool 
and learned to jump to retrieve items on 
slit' Ives, Not awesome kneebcnding leaps, 
but unobtrusive little lifts using the ankles. I 
had it perfected to the point where it looked 
like I merely hiccupped. 

When the book 1 wanted at the libary was 
on the top shelf... hiccup... it was mine. 
When the chili seasoning in the grocery 
store was hung on a nail eight feet 
high... hiccup... no need to worry. 

But I gladly gave up jumping for the 
greatest development in men's shoes since 
man became a bi-ped. Platform shoes. I 
could glide in style in three-inch heels. 

I could reach things I never thought 
possible in my tallest dreams. I could look 
people in the eyes. 

Never again would I have to ask someone 
else to dial for me in phone booths. No more 
hiccups. No more wisecracks. I thought 1 
had died and gone to a little heaven. But all 
good things come to pass. Fashion marches 
on. 

Platforms went the way of button-down 
spats. 

But another means of coping has come 
along: "Runt's Lib," a cult for shorties. 
Charter members include Mickey Rooney, 
Bob Docking and Duane Acker. The goal of 
the organization is short and simple—to 
make everyone short. Someday we will rise, 
machetes in hand, and for anyone over five- 
six,, .swish, . .off at the knees. 

So get your short-sighted insults in early, 
folks. Your time has come. Runt's Lib will 
bring you to your knees. 

But maybe I shouldn't complain. There 
are advantages to being short. Like getting 
into movies for half price until I was 16 
years old. Like people asking me to their 
parties because they don't think I will eat or 
drink too much. Like other sports 
photographers not minding if I stand in front 
of them at football games. Like dancing with 
tall girls. 

And yes, the weather is fine down here. 



Ka " t s ? Collegian 



Monday, December 11, 1978 



(USPS »'■«») 



THE C0LL6OIAN .» published By Student Publications, inc., Kansas State University, daily except Saturday, 
Sundays, holidays and vacation periods 

OFFICES are In the north wing ol Kedlle Hall, phone 53 J 455 S 

SECOND CLASS postage paid at Manhattan, Kant i\*H01 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: SI 5, one calendar year, 17 SO, one semester 

THE COLLEGIAN functions in a legally autonomous relationship with the University and is written and edited by 
iiudentsservinq the University community 

Paul Rhodes, Editor 
Terry Brungardt. Advertising Manager 



Knit or, 

1 have observed many articles recently 
concerning the Iranian students' protests 
and am thoroughly dismayed by the in- 

Go to Iran 
to solve problems 

Editor, 

Re: Iranian student demonstrations. 

There definitely is a civil problem in Iran. 
1 believe that the policies taken by Shah 
Mohammed Hem Pahlavi and his gover- 
nment are wrong and need to be changed. 1 
also believe that the United States should 
i c.ism'ss its policies toward Iran considering 
I he stand President Carter has taken con- 
cerning human rights in other countries. 
The struggle ol the Iranian people is one that 
is genuine. 

But the way the Iranian students support 

I he peoples' struggle is to me questionable. 
The college campus is a place of learning. It 
was never meant to be a political forum for 
llii' Iranians to disturb and intcrupt classes 
w ilh their demonstrations against the shah. 

II they want to demonstrate, let them do it 
elsewhere, someplace other than the college 
campus. 

1 think I have an answer that would not 
mil> ease the climate on campus but also 
help the Iranian people in their struggle. 
The Iranian Student Association (ISA) 
publications continually solicate donations 
In help the Iranian people. Why don't the 
Iranian students give up their tuitions and 
donate them to the cause? 

The Iranian students should go home and 
gel involved in the struggle to oust the shah 
instead oi cowering and hiding behind the 
protection of the United States. The shah 
can't be overthrown on a college campus in 
the United States. His regime must be 
ovelhiown in the streets and countryside of 
Irar. 

I myself am tired of seeing and hearing 
(lit- Iranian students complaining but never 
acting. 

Robert Kice 
sophomore in journalism 



completeness ol the "concerned" students 
thought processes. This is evident in the 
American students' opinions as well as the 
Iranians. 1 agee that there are definite 
problems existing in that the atrocities we 
have iearned of do exist. If the shah is at the 
roo) ut the problem, as the foreign students 
claim, then he should lie taken from control 
But tins is where eveyone slops. Eliminating 
the current bad regime doesn't guarantee 
that a good government will replace it. 

In solving any problem two questions 
must be answered First: What isiarei the 
cause* si of that problem? Once this is 
determined you have the basis to continue 
and to attempt to correct the situation 
As&un.ing the cause of the problem is the 
shah, ihe second question (and perhaps the 
more important i is: What is the best 
alternative? 

Note, 1 did not say the shah should be 
ousletl from control. The reason for this is 
obi ioi is: if the shah is overthrown abruptly. 
what or who takes his place? Thus far 1 
haven*! heard the Iranian students offer any 
alternatives to the shah, save that he should 
be replaced by a democracy. What I 
question is will that occur? Who will head 
1'ial democracy? Has anything been done by 
the dissenters to propose or establish a 
viable election system? Have they proposed 
aa uteri m government to provide order to 
I heir system during the changeover? Will 
the proposed new government actually be 
representative of the people of Iran or will it 
turn out to be another dictatorship? 

These are only a lew of the many 
questions that need to be answered, but I 
hope they are sufficient in number to prove 
that there is more to the possible "cure" 
than meets the eye. In sum, I guess I could 
stale that any fool can "hitch," as the 
Collegian so ineloquently terms it. It takes a 
quite different person, a much more in- 
telligent person to devise AND implement a 
better alternative. I sincerely hope that this 
latter type of person exists in many num- 
Ixms in Iran so that they (not Americans) 
can eliminate their own problems. 

Denny Hill 
instructor in economics 




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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon.. December! 1, 1978 



„ Weeding waste, corruption 
may head Congress' agenda 



WASHINGTON 'APi-lf House leaders 
have their way, members of the new 
Congress which convenes in January will 
spend most of their lime routing out 
government waste and corruption, and less 
lime on new federal programs. 

Members of the hierarchy of both political 
parlies say the demand among the voters is 
lor less expensive, more efficient govern- 
ment. 

■'People want more for their money," 
Hep. John Andean ol Illinois, the third- 
ranking Republican leader in the House, 
said. "1 would like to see us convene an 
oversight Congress," he said. 

Last week, House Speaker Thomas 
O'Neill arranged three days of meetings for 
House stall members on how to pinpoint 
government Iraud and find out which 
federal programs are wasteful or have 
outlived their usefulness. 

So many people signed up that 
registration had to he cut off at 400 par- 
ticipants. 

Among I he speakers was Sen. Lawton 
(Inles tl>-Fla.) who directed a 
congressional investigation leading to the 
indictment of dozens of officials of the 
General Services Administration (GSAt. 

'People really have lost faith and con- 
lidcnce in tongress' ability to oversee the 



tcderal bureaucracy, ' Chiles said. 

NOTING A Justice Department estimate 
that one in every 10 federal dollars may be 
1 1 in i to fraud, Chiles said the GSA scandals 
may be only the start of disclosures of 
widespread wrongdoing among 

bureaucrats. 

Chilis said the GSA fraud was allowed to 
run so deep lor so long, principally because 
no congressional committee ever gave more 
than a superficial examination of how its 
money was being spent . 

The question Chiles said troubles him now 
is, "How do we put GSA back together 
again'.'" 

The message Congress should take from 
lax cul relerendums such as Proposition 13 
is not that people want to dismantle the 
lederal government, Chiles said, but to 
make certain that what already exists is 
responsive and serving a genuine need. 

Chiles said he senses a grounds well of 
public cynicism about excessive govern- 
ment spending 

Anderson said a combination of well- 
luianced special interest groups, House 
committees in ten's ted more in protecting 
than in scrutinizing federal programs and 
I he lack of "sex appeal" in congressional 
oversight have prevented careful review of 
how lederal dollars are spent. 



dm 



THE LIVING-LEARNING SCHOOL 1011 OSAGE. 
NOW ACCEPTING NEW STUDENTS FOR JANUARY 1979 SEMESTER. 

GRADES K-8 



NOVEMBER « DECEMBER 
LEARNING EXPERIENCES 
HIGHLIGHTS: 

Math: Experiments & algebra 
Science Insects, reptiles, A chemistry 
Language arts, writing our own books 
Spanish Simon says 
Art Cornhusk dolls 
Music: singing 



INDEPTH, INTENSIVE, INTERDISCIPLINARY 
INQUIRIES: 

Norm American Indians History, myths, 
music, cralts, contemporary issues. 
Aging, personal histories, experiments with 
physical limitations of aging, media analysis & 
held trips 



TUITION IS $85 PER MO. FULL DAY, $60 PER. MO. 

HALF DAY KINDERGARTEN* PARTIAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

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DEAD WEEK 

SPECIALS 
ALL WEEK! 

< Mr. K's Care Package For You! ) 



Taxpayers pick up check 
for Congressmen's travel 



WASHINGTON (API -More than one- 
third of the eligible senators and at least f>9 
House members have made overseas trips 
at taxpayers* expense since Congress ad- 
journed in mid-October, State Department 
and congressiona I records show. 

line trip ended in tragedy. Kep Leo Kyan 
< I) Calif. ), three newsmen and a Peoples 
Temple member were gunned down after an 
inspection of the religious settlement 
rounded by the Rev. Jim Jones in 
Jonestown, Guyana. Witnesses said the visit 
triggered the attack on Hyan and led to the 
mass murder-suicide of Jones and more 
than 900 of his followers. 

The most popular destinations of House 
members during this congressional travel 
season were the People's Republic of China 
and Japan. 

The most popular trips by senators were 
to a NATO conference in Portugal and to the 
Soviet Union, where a delegation of senators 
met with Soviet officials. 

This was the first lime the trips have not 
included a few lame ducks^Congress 
members either defeated for re-election or 
retiring. Both the House and the Senate 
passed resolutions two years ago th;it bar- 
retiring and defeated members from 
making trips at taxpayers' expense once the 
congressional session has ended. 

STATE DEPARTMENT and 

congressional records show 29 of the 80 
senators who will return to Congress in 
January and 59 of the 358 House members 
who won re-election have made trips 
overseas in the past month and a half. 



The cost of the trips is not known. 
However, members of Congress are per- 
mitted expenses of up to $75 a day, plus air 
tare and taxicab costs, Their expenses won't 
be compiled and published until next April. 

Reports filed with the House and Senate 
showed travel by congressmen and senators 
and by their staffs last year cost the 
government about $1.7 million. 

One difficulty in figuring the costs is that 
some travelers used military flights while 
others flew on commercial planes Some 
look their wives and must reimburse the 
government for the spouses' transportation 
costs. 

In addition, at least one delegation to 
China asked the State Department to help 
arrange a dinner for their hosts. 

Most trips were to more than one country. 
Some congressmen made multiple stops. 
And several made more than one trip. 



[MONDAY 

5 C NITE! 

5 C DrOWt < 8-9:00) 

5 C Second Pitchers i<m«:<h» 

50 c Adm. (10 Nickels Till 10:00) 



Be Watching For Tomorrow's Special! 



mR1\S 



r 



BUSINESS SENIORS 

Interested in Resume Booklet 

Pick Up Data Sheet For 

CBA Resume Booklet In 

Dean's Office In Calvin 

By Wed., Dec. 13th 

Have Them In 
By FrL, Dec. 15th 

(Form Is Identical To 
Placement Centers) 



ijto union bookstore 




o 




on 



fo®@fc (m^xmrnm 




'cT 









That's right! The Union Bookstore's used 
book program saved K -State students better 
than $250,000 00 this year That's more than 
$i360astudent! How did we do it 7 Byusing com- 
mon sense Instead of sending big checks off to 
the publishers for our textbook stock, we prefer 
to put it in your hands in cash when we buy your 
books It makes sense, the savings add up fast, 
and what's more, we ve been doing it for you for 
years As a result, the average student's book ex- 
penses are reduced by about one-fifth. 

Here are the details: First, we pay 20% more 
for your books than is currently available at 
other dealers. Second, these exceptionally high 
prices attract a lot of books— literally* tons of 
them, so our stocks are the largest in Manhattan, 
bar none! (One out of every three course books 
sold at the Union this year was a used book.) 
With such a high volume of used copies 

k-state union 

bookstore 




available, and since you save twice on used 
books < once when you but it, and again when you 
sell it) it is easy to see why the net result is such 
a huge savings Its a fact that the Union puts 
more cash in the hands of K-State students than 
anybody else in the book business You couldn't 
save more vf you bought all new books at 
wholesale! 

So why are we buying this ad? Not just to 
blow our own horn. We figure that if you know 
the facts, you can save yourself a lot of money. 
So we bought this ad to convince you that there 
are only two simple steps to save money on your 
textbooks 

I. Sell your books at the Union— you save 
because we pay more. 

2 Buy your books at the Union— you save 
because we have more used books 

So. gather up all those books lying around 
the apartment or dorm room, and sell them at 
the Union (in front of Forum Hall) From Dec. 11 
Thru Dec. 22 Then, come see us again 
during registration Remember, we save you 
more, and we can prove it. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon.,D«C«mt»f 11, 1978 



Venus probes land, 
send surface data 



MOUNTAIN VIEW. Calif. 

i AP) -Scientists began analyzing readings 
of sunlight, heat and pressure transmitted 
33.5 million miles from Venus after, 
pronouncing America's first comprehensive 
space mission to the planet a complete 
success 

Five probes plunged through Venus' at- 
mosphere Saturday, transmitting data to 
elated scientists monitoring the experiment 

The data transmitted from the probes was 
translated into sketches of clouds, winds and 
other features of Venus. It was then tran- 
smitted some 3.1.5 million miles to tracking 
stations in California and Australia 

The finished portrait may take months to 
complete, but the first data will be analyzed 
early this week. The first thing 35 scientists 
from around the world will examine is the 
effectiveness of the instruments aboard the 
five probes 



Scientists said they want to take a closer 
look a I one of the probes which, in an 
unexpected development, continued to 
transmit after impact, giving out after at) 
hour 

They also plan to cooperate with and learn 
more from the launching oi two Soviet 
[robes, Venera 11 and 12, scheduled to land 
on Venus later this month lor similar at- 
mospheric monitoring. 

FOUK PKOBICS made the hour long 
descent within minutes of each other, while 
a fifth, the cylindrical "bus" that carried 
the probes from Earth, plunged into the 
Venusian atmosphere an hour later. It 
burned up within two minutes after sending 
back its share of data. 

Scientists said they were surprised one 
probe continued to send back data after 
hitting Venus' surface, where temperatures 



are around iMMi degrees Fahrenheit 

The probe continued to operate for 67 
in mules after bit ling the surface, the second 
longesl a probe has survived on Venus. 

The Day probe was built by Hughes 
Aircraft Co., and scientists said they would 
examine the structure of the spacecraft to 
determine wlt> it outlasted the Others, 

The lirsl information scientists received 
was that the temperature 25 miles above 
Venus was 243 degrees Fahrenheit . 

Scientists at Ames, from which the $225 
million. 243-day Pioneer Venus prohes were 
controlled, said I he mullicrafl mission was 
the first of its kind, 

The probes leave behind in space Pioneer 
Venus 1, a vehicle that last week began an 
estimated year-long orbit around Venus, 
which is similar to Earth in size but whose 
atmosphere appears to be inhospitable to 
lite as found on Earth. 



Arts and Sciences faculty 
face new evaluation form 



By BETH HARTENSTEIN 
■ Collegian Reporter 

Arts and Sciences Council is laying the 
groundwork for a new type of teacher 
evaluation which will be similar to the 
current evaluations for outstanding teacher. 

"This is something that came up last 
semester," council member Doug Cook 
said. "The original idea was to work it in 
with the outstanding teacher nominations 
Students would be able to write how they 
feel about the outstanding and the not so 
outstanding teachers." 

Currently the council is lining up the 
questionnaire that would be used. This 
evaluation will not be introduced until the 
middle of next semester, so students could 
consider using it toward the end of the 
semester, Cook said. 

The type of evaluation the council is 
working on will not be a questionnaire given 
to all classes, Cook said. 

"If a student has a bad instructor and he 
would like his feelings known, we will en- 
courage him to come to or call Arts and 
Sciences Council," he said. "If only one or 
two students come with a complaint, we will 
act as an arbitrator and set up a time they 
could meet the instructor to discuss the 
problem." 

COOK SAID if the council feels the 
problem is large enough, it will come to the 
class with a questionnaire evaluation, which 
will be turned in to the department head. 

"We would come to class with a form to 
give the students. If the instructor doesn't 
want to cooperate, we'll come in before or 
after class," he said. 

After the evaluation has been returned to 
the department head, the problem is out of 
the hands of Arts and Sciences Council, Cook 
said. 

"We will try to keep the head of the 
department informed of the students' ap- 
prehension about the teacher, but if the 
department doesn't want to do anything 
about it, that's about all we can do," he said. 

Cook said the council considered 
publishing the evaluation results in booklet 
form, as is done at the University of Indiana, 
but with the cost of printing and composition 
it felt too much expense was involved, he 
said. 

OTHER councils were invited to work 
with Arts and Sciences council on the 
evaluation, Cook said. 

-£X. OFF-CAMPUS M 

* STUDENTS 

ey A* Business Meeting' 

WED., DEC 13 

7:00 p.m.-Union 206 
Agendo 

1 ) Discussion of off- 
Campus Council. 

2) Spring Election 
Procedures. 

3) Social Events 



Reactions varied from mild approval to 
strong dislike and shock, he said. 

"There is no one for students to bitch at if 
they are having a problem with a teacher," 
he said. "We just want to act as a neutral 
body and help get these things off the 
students' chests." 



WORKSHOP 

FAMILY SEXUAL ABUSE AND INCEST 
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 14 

UNION 212, FROM 1-5 P.M. 
SPEAKER: DR. DENNIS DAILEY 

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Social Work Club Members— II 

Sponsored by KSC Social Work Club 



Aggieville 

OPEN LATE 

Monday thru Thursday 

and Sunday afternoons 

until Christmas 



Aggieville Wishes You A Merry Christmas 



.ftr - ^ 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon„ DwMfntwr 11,1978 



'Woman of year' speaks 



Newspapers must tailor format to readers 



By SALL1E HOFMEISTER 
Collegian Reporter 

Many newspapers are being forced to 
tailor their papers to maintain readers' 
interests. The Louisville Courier- Journal 
and Times has realized that readership of 
newspapers is declining, and has come out 
with a supplement to accommodate the 
desires of their readers, Carol Sutton, 
assistant to the publisher of the Courier- 
Journal, said. 




Carol Sutton 

The publics' tastes have changed. People 
are demanding more coverage of special 
interest areas like travel, leisure and 
consumer information, she said. "The 
Consumer Extra," the supplement to the 
Courier- Journal, focuses on one of these 



desired special interests: consumerism, 
Sutton said. 

Sutton, one of Time magazine's "Women 
of the Year," was guest speaker at Friday 
afternoon's National Affairs Colloquium. 
The colloquium, a special course of fered by 
the Department of Journalism and Mass 
Communications, is taught by David 
Hacker, visiting professor of journalism . 

"In 1970, it began to become obvious 
through market studies and experience as 
editor that people were losing interest," said 
Sutton, one of the first women to be ap- 
pointed to top management of a major 
American newspaper. 

THE COURIER-JOURNAL is not the only 
newspaper facing these problems, Sutton 
said. Many newspapers are feeling the pinch 
of other media in competition for public 
audiences, she said. Television is the largest 
competitor, but leisure time, travel, the 
tennis courts, and other forms of en- 
tertainment also offer competition for 
papers, she said. 

The initial attempt of the Courier- Journal 
and Times, to regain lost readers was 
similar to action taken by the New York 
Times, Sutton said. The Times has catered 
to special needs of their readers by 
publishing a more tailored newspaper. 

Sutton said one problem with the sec- 
tioning method is the cost of newsprint, 
which has more than doubled in the last 
eight years. The Times claims their added 
sections require additonal print and paper, 
which increases the cost of publishing the 
paper, she said. They have increased their 
circulation as a result of the additions which 
has also defrayed the production cost, she 
added. 

As an alternative sectioning method, 



K-State team, individuals 
rank high in meats contest 



The K-State senior meats team placed 
second in a field of 24 teams at the Inter- 
collegiate Meat Judging Contest held Nov 
28 in Madison, Wis. 

K-State had two team members place in 
the top 10 high-individuals category. This 
category represents the 100 highest in- 
dividual scores in the contest. Jim DeGeer, 
senior in animal science, took second place 
while Alan Scots, senior in annimal science, 
placed third. 



As a team K-State placed first in beef 
grading. DeGeer took first place in this 
contest. Sents placed fourth. 

K-State placed third in beef judging, 
eighth in pork judging, and 10th in lamb 
judging. For combined scores in beef 
judging and beef grading K-State took first. 

First place in the contest went to the 
University of Illinois with Iowa State 
University taking third. 



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Fri. Sat til 7:00 

Sundays 1-5 III Christmas 




which is more economically realistic, Sutton 
said her paper has devised a 12-page tabloid 
< the format used by the Collegian), which is 
without advertisement, and offers sub- 
scribers information on which they have 
expressed interest. The weekly publication 
is offered by subscription only. 

THE CONSUMER EXTRA, edited by 
Sutton, has published 14 issues since its 
September 1978 debut. In polling the public 
on their reaction to the prospective 
publication, it was found that advertisement 
was not desired, Sutton said. 

"We would like to have subscriptions 
support the supplement in the future," 
Sutton said. A low subscription rate has 
been offered at the onset to attract an 
audience, but the price is anticipated within 
a year, if the supplement does not die before 
then, she said. 



Sutton said the supplement has its own 
staff, and originates its own ideas. The 
responsibilities of the regular paper have 
not been diminished because of the sup- 
plement. The idea of The Consumer Extra is 
not to reduce the size of the regular paper, 
or cut out any of its news. It is to add a 
special interest supplement at the wish of 
the readers, she said. 

MANY READERS desired insertion of the 
special interst section into the regular 
paper. Sutton said this incorporation would 
cost the paper about $500,000 per year. Also, 
many people would not read the extra 
section and would object to paying a higher 
price for it, she added. 

"Newspapers are habits and people don't 
like their habits messed with. It takes a long 
time for people to develop new habits," 
Sutton said. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon.. December 11. 1978 



tt Inlri AmAmanru'' Medical volunteers dedicated 

nei p , emergency - t0 pr0W d/ n g help, protection 



By KAREN CARLSON 
Collegian Reporter 

Behind the scenes at K -State's activities, 
the Emergency Service Unit waits- to 
provide emergency medical attention in 
case it is required. 

The Emergency Service Unit (ESU) is a 
Ked Cross organization dedicated lo prolect 
the health of others and provide help lo those 
in need of medical assistance, according to 
Steve Holman, a member of ESU. 

The 25 volunteer members of ESU work at 
all K-State basketball games, football 
ga noes and concerts, 

['.realise it is a volunteer organization, 
ESU depends on its members to provide 
llieir own equipment, Holman said 

"Each member has a trauma kit with 
many essentials needed for first aid care," 
he said. "They cost about $300 a shot. ' 



In order to qualify as an ESU member, 
one must first pass courses in advanced 
first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation 
iCPKj. Next they must go before a review 
board. 

"The board is pretty tough," Holman said. 
"We challenge them and we never let them 
know if they've said the right thing until its 
all over Then we keep them or boot 'em 
out." 

About half the people who go through ESU 
(raining are turned down. Holman said. 
Many people fail because they can't face the 
Ixiard. 

"Its easy lo really study and pass the 
written tests, but the review board is the 
real lest," he said. "The board asks itself 'if 
l hey crack up in front of the Iward, what are 
they going to do in a real situation?" ' 

After passing bolh courses and the review 



Nuke safety equipment test 
goes better than predicted 



IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (AFi-A weekend 
ex penmen I to lest the efficiency of safely 
equipment at nuclear power plants was even 
more successful than predicted, officials 
said. 

Scientists simulated a nuclear reactor 
accident Saturday night to determine if an 
emergency backup system would be ef- 
fective against what they termed Ihe most 

Macho disguise 
conceals desires 

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP)— If every man 
in the country became trustful, caring and 
tender tomorrow, American society would 
probably crumble, according to clinical 
psychologist Herb Goldberg, 

During a seminar over the weekend, the 
author of "The Hazards of Being Male" 
acknowledged that the country is in the 
midst of a gender revolution. But he said 
women are the only ones making the most of 
the revolution. 

Men are left floundering in a "liberation 
crunch," Goldberg told a workshop on male 
hazards. He said men can't pull free of the 
stereotype that orders them to be hard- 
working, rational and independent. 

Today, an increasingly free woman no 
longer hurries dinner to the table at 6 p.m., 
nor does she jump every time her fella 
wants an ashtrav, Goldberg said. 



serious potential operating threat to nuclear 
power plants a cooling system failure. 

The backup system worked, and the 
preliminary data was better than computer 
predictions, said Department of Energy 
spokesman Dick Black ledge. 

The test was conducted at the Department 
of Energy's Idaho National Engineering 
Laboratory in Ihe eastern Idaho desert at 
the request of the Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission. 

THE TEST, the first of its kind, involved 
interrupting the flow of water in the primary 
cooling system for the reactor's 
core— simulating the coolant pipe breaking. 

A backup system automatically flooded 
the core wilh water and kept temperatures 
well below the melting point for the cladding 
(the metal casing) of the reactor's uranium 
oxide fuel rods. 

The cladding temperature reached about 
900 degrees Fahrenheit, compared with the 
1,370 degrees predicted, said Larry Leach, 
experimental program director for the 
project. 

The cladding would begin to fail at about 
2,300 degrees and the fuel would melt at 
5,000 degrees 

Nuclear power critics have said a loss-of- 
cooling accident could lead to a reactor core 
melt-down, with the 5,000-degree tem- 
peratures, the breaking of the containment 
vessel or a steam explosion and the release 
of radioactive material. 



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group, at your place or ours. And, at a price you'll 
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Bring your group to Val s for private or semi -private dining 
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lx»ard, a prospective member is put out in 
the field on probation for six months, 
Holman said. 

"We have a pretty fool-proof system" said 
Glen Wilkinson, one of ESU's supevisors. 

MEMBERS OF ESU cannot administer 
medicine lo anyone but can give aspirin or 
something for an upset stomach. 

A dispatching system keeps track of 
everyone. Genera liy, ESU can reach a 
victim within 45 seconds at KSU Stadium 
and ;Hl seconds at Ahcarn Field House, 
Holman said. 

"In case of a heart attack, all units are 
sited and CPU begins, " Holman said. 
"Whoever works on (he patient follows him 
all the way through to (he hospital. This is to 
make the patient feel as if they've got a 
friend along with them. 

Another member of ESU is responsible for 
gelling the family to the hospital since 



family members cannot ride in the am- 
bulance, he said. 

ESU members don't see much of a 
basketball or football game while they are 
on duty They are busy watching (he crowd 
lor signs of a possible emergency, Holman 
said. 

"When we play KLI in football, it worries 
us," Wilkinson said. "But Ihis pasl season 
when we played KU, nothing serious hap- 
pened. A few fights and people getting hit 
wilh ice and bottles were all. I know that the 
slutloiils get excited and I understand that I 
gel excited once in a while myself when 1 get 
to watch the game " 

Concerts are the busiest time because 
most of the drug-related incidents happen 
there. If someone has a drug -related 
problem, they won't be reported lo the 
police by ESU because ils main concern is 
safety, not catching law-breakers. 
Wilkinson said. 




Gallery Hours: 
Monday thru Friday 

8:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

gfTfl k-state union 

l^Ziupc arts 



HW1?l> 



Come Visit 

the 
K-State Union 
Art Gallery! 

Now Showing: 

The KSU 
Permanent Art 

Collection 
November 20- 
December 15 



Pizza&Pasta 



ATTENTION 

To all the people who 

are interested in a job 

on a newspaper. 

Applications for 

Advertising Salesmen and 

Collegian Staff are available 

in Kedzie 103. Deadline 

to turn in applications is 

Wed., Dec. 13, 

at 5:00 p.m. 

(Applications are to be returned to 
Kedzie 103) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon., December 11, 1978 





This men's 
birthday 
H was 

■m • I 

Friday... 

Congratulate 

H him 



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R EFER ¥ 



Hit /./I /Vu BIBLE 






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Selection at 

Cross Reference 

220 Poyntz 
Manhattan 



Ph.913-776-8071 



Day by night 



Photo by John Bock 



A flock of birds flying east of campus Saturday afternoon are tran- 
sformed to a nighttime image by a special reversal printing process. 



Law grads top pay 
* from N.Y. legal firms 

WASHINGTON <AP)-A few New York 
law firms have broken the $30,000 barrier in 
starling salaries for new law school 
graduates, according to a survey published 
in the magazine Student Lawyer, 

The survey, conducted by Ronald Rock, 
director of research for David J. White and 
Associates of Chicago, showed that starting 
salaries in top New York law firms ranged 
up to $31,500 a year compared with a top 
starling salary last year of $28,000. 




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ANNOUNCING: 

APPOINTMENTS SHOULD NOW BE MADE FOR 

OFF-CAMPUS ROYAL PURPLE PICTURES 

December 15 is the last day. 

Union 202 today and make your appointment. 

FORGET TO TAKE YOUR STAMPED 



I 




10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Moo.. D*c«mb«M 1,1978 



'We were younger. ..experience-wise' 



'Hi' Faubion recalls K-State in '48 



By RAND ALL SHUCK 
Collegian Reporter 

When Hiram "Hi" Faubion first saw It- 
State, the year was 1948. K-State was the 
Kansas State College of Agriculture and 
Applied Sciences then, and boasted a 
student body of about 5.000. 

The campus that greeted Faubion was 
smaller then. Construction of buildings such 
as Eisenhower, Putnam, Ahearn, Dykstra 
and the K-State Union was still in the future. 

On the site of Ackert Hall and the Kramer 



Class of1955 



complex stood more than 400 trailer and 
wooden barracks-type four plexes for 
married students. 

The student union of 1948, Faubion said, 
"was an army barracks building that sat 
across from where tbe Ramada Ifiriis now, 
at about the middle of the' current lower 
Union parking lot.'' 

The diversions afforded by this temporary 
structure matched the luxury of its exterior, 
Faubion said. "It was a shed building with 
some booths in it. Just a place to walk 
around, get a cup or coffee and a stale 
doughnut." 

NICHOLS GYM was a center of student 
activity then, hosting Wildcat basketball 
and dances. Nichols and its counterpart, 
Memorial Stadium, made up the K-State 
sports complex of 1948. 

Football was the reason Faubion left his 
home in Phillipsburg and came to K-State. 
From 194y to 1951, he played all of his games 
in Memorial Stadium. 

Football player Faubion, who is a doctor 
oi veterinary medicine, said he appreciates 
athletics and enjoyed playing, but he ex- 
pressed concern as to the way athletics are 
being presented in today's colleges. 

Sports were my reason for coming to 
college," Faubion said. "Without sports and 
mv scholarship I probably would have been 
working in a gas station or as a hired hand. 
So sports are important to me in that 
respect, but I was more than just an athlete. 
1 was also a student," Faubion said. 

"I value the time 1 spent both in class and 
on the field," Faubion said, ilhink a lot of 
athletics il it is used as a means to an end, 
but very few use il as a means anymore." 

FAUBION RKiiAN his pre- veterinary 
studies while playing football and found 
himsell choosing between football and 
veterinary medicine his senior year. The 
choice was not a difficult one, Faubion said. 

"Sports was a big thing as we knew it 
then At the end of the football term the pro 



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offers came but I decided on veterinary 
medicine," he said. 

"Of course, a good pro salary at that time 
was $6,000 and if you were lucky you got 
$1,000 bonus for signing; at that time you 
could make the same working by the hour." 

Veterinary medicine at K-State changed 
while Faubion was a student, he said. When 
he began his studies, veterinary sciences 
were taught in Waters, Leasure and Burt 
Halls. Dykstra was in the planning stage 
and scheduled to be completed in time for 
use by the graduating class of 1955. 

Faubion, who has watched the growth of 
K state and its veterinary medicine 
program from his Smith Center practice, 
finds the new complex impressive. "The 
clinic that I started in was not a whole lot 
larger than the post-mortem room in the 
new complex," he said. 

FAUBION SAID he considered new 
methods of instruction major advances. 
"The thing that most impressed me is that if 
a student is interested in a specific 
procedure, it would be available to him. He 
could check out a videotape of the 
procedure, take il to a viewing room and 
have a one-to-one relationship with the in- 
structor and himself." 

Instruction was much different in the 
early fifties, Faubion said. 

"My experience was that if you were 
present at the right moment and wanted to 
see it, you looked over someone's shoulder, 
hoping that you could see all you needed to 
see or maybe the next time you would see 
what you missed." 

Faubion said both the school and its 
students have changed through the years. 

"We were smaller in the '40s and '5us," 
Faubion said. "We were younger people 
then— younger, experience-wise. " 

Students are more sophisticated now, he 



said. Faubion said he has seen this through 
the veterinary graduates he has taken into 
his practice. 

"I think the academic quality now is twice 
as high as it was in my lime," Faubion said. 



"The students coming out now are very 
well-trained veterinarians. 1 would love to 
be a student of veterinary medicine in this 
new complex now. Whether 1 could be or not, 
I really don't know." 




Needed: People to help 
spend Summer 
Activity Fees. 



II you w gone to summer school and you wonder 
how your activity fee was spent, or it you just wonder 
where summer activity teas are span) this job is lor 
you. SGS is taking applications lor Summer 
Allocations Board. Fill out applications In the SGS ci- 
lice on the ground Moor of the Union by 3:30 p.m. 
Thursday the 14th. 



«33»> 





HAIR BY RICK & FRIENDS 

ft . f » TMt FI*M PIOHHIDNtU UN* O* SKiH 

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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Man., December 11, 1978 



11 




Stall pholoiby Bo Ratter and Pete Souia 



ABOVE.. .Guard Glenn Marshall of K-State plays a quick game of keep- 
away with an unidentified player from Cal Poly- Pomona during Saturday 
night's game at Ahearn Field House. Marshall, who had nine points, is 
now averaging ^^ points per game. 

'Cats tame Broncos; 
win season 's 5th game 



By JOHN IXU>I>KK11M.K 
Collegian Reporter 
Trying lit avoid a letdown afler beating 
Minnesota Tuesday, the K Stale Wildcats 
n» lealed a stubborn Cal Poly Pomona team, 
JS7-7I, Saturday nighl lie-lore a near-capacity 
iTowdat Alien rn Field House. 

Three sla iters and one substitute led the 
u;.> ■ 1 1 he 'Oils' fifth vietory. 



Sports 



H ando tlUickman paeed the team tor the 
M-< in I time this season as he scored 18 
pi .its on a nine lor 11 shooting night. In 
a (lilion, Klackman continued his superb 
i dense as he blocked three shots, had two 
steals and led the team with four assists. 

Ed Nealy pumped in 17 points and 
grabbed 12 rebounds to lead K state in that 
category . 

Steve Soldner scored a season high of 16 
points, while Brent Murphy came off the 
I tench lo score a career-high 15 points while 
\»\ l.ng st'V«n of eight shots from the field. 

Loiando played extremely well as 
iv iili-nccd by his fine shooting," Coach Jack 
Mail mar said, "I thought Murphy really got 
alter 1 1, which 1 was glad to sec." 

K-STATK STARTED off the night by 
carrying leads ol three I o seven points in the 
opening till minutes of Ihe I irst half. 

Al Ihe half, K Stale held a 44.11 ad- 
vantage, while Blackmail and Nealy led the 
wiij in scoring with It) points apiece. 

In tJ k second halt, Ihe Wildcats jumped 
oil to a 2(1- point lead at 56-36 with If) minutes 
lell in ihe game behind I he outside shooting 
<>l Nealy and Clenn Marshall. 

From there on in, K State coasted to 
victory as I lie nearest the Broncos got was 
the I ma I margin of Hi points 

For the night. K-Slate continued Iheir fine 
shooting as they made :)9o( 72 from the field 
for r i4 2 percent, while they shot a mediocre 
nine of 17 tree I brows for 52.9 percent. 

Cal Poly improved their shooting in the 
sitonil ball as they finished wilh 4) percent 



trot 1 1 the field on 25 of lil and shot 84 percent 
Iron: the free throw on 21 for 25. 

"Defensively, wfi gave up too many Tree 
ihi'ows. Our free throw defense broke 
down." Hart man said. 

CAL POl.Y'S lop scorers were center Don 
Johnson wilh 20 points, forward Cleve 
Porter with IK and forward Kenny Scott with 
Hi points and i:i rebounds. 

"Overall. I thought we played well, I was 
eoncerned we might have a letdown after 
the Minnesota game," Marl man added. "We 
handled their press well and were able to 
play a lol ol our boys, which is something 
(See JACK p. 13) 




TIGHT DEFENSE. ..Fred Barton (left) of K-State defends against Jason 
Malinowski of Cal Poly Pomona during the first half of Saturday night's 
game. Barton, a junior guard, played for the first time this season due to 
aback injury. 



i: 



KAREN 

Love does not consist 
in gazing at each other... 

But in looking outward 
in the same direction. 

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY! 

LOVE, 

STEVE 




FREE GIFT WRAPPING 




CAROUSEL 
CHARGE 




Mon.-Thurs. 

10 8:30 

FrL & Sat. 

106 

Sunday 

125 



1130 Moro In Aggieville 



12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Mon., 0««mb»r11,1978 



Team— poems in motion 
Crowd— lack of emotion 



By GRANT SANBORN 
Features Editor 

'Twasthe night of Ca I -Poly game 
And all through Ahearn 
All the creatures were stirring ; 
There was a little concern. 

Soldner got the tipoff 
And the game is underway. 
Soldner got the ball back 

Broncos crush KC 
with 2nd half surge 
to win division title 

DENVER (APt— Craig Morton, com- 
pleting a team-record 19 of 22 passes for 
three touchdowns, passed Denver to the 
AFC Western Division title Sunday as the 
Broncos defeated Kansas City 24-3 in 
National Football League action. 

The victory boosted the Broncos' record to 
10-5 and produced their second straight 
divisional championship, Kansas City 
dropped to 4-1 1. 

During one stretch in the game, Morton 
completed 16 passes in a row, setting a club 
record and falling just one completion short 
of the NFL mark. His completion per- 
centage of .864 also set a Denver mark and 
was the second best in league history. 

Tight end Riley Odoms caught seven 
passes for 165 yards, including TD catches 
of 23 and 29 yards in the second half. 

Morton's other scoring aerial was a 4- 
yarder to fullback Lonnie Per r in in the first 
quarter as the Broncos rebounded from a 3-0 
deficit. 

The Denver defense, meanwhile, held its 
opponent without a touchdown for the 
second straight game. After Jan Stenerud's 
2:i-yard field goal midway through the 
opening quarter, the Chiefs crossed midfield 
five times but came up empty handed three 
times on turnovers. 

The Chiefs will finish their 1978 season 
against Seattle in the Kingdom next Sunday. 

JV team wins 

The K-Slate junior varsity outclassed the 
visitors from Butler County Junior College 
Saturday en route to an impressive 83-51 
win. 

Center James Bailey led all scorers with 
18 points and 12 rebounds, including two 
spectacular dunk shots Forward John 
Chmiel added 13 points and sophomore 
guard Kevin Gardenhire chipped in 17, 
mostly on long range jumpers. 

Jayvee coach Darryl Winston played his 
entire squad, including newcomers Kent 
Walker and Woody Soldner. 

The lopsided win upped the jayvees' 
season record to 3-1. 



CHRISTMAS SALE 

ftfg 

in Kilev. Kansas 



European Antiques, Sideboards, Buf- 
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tainer will arrive before Christmas. 



Open 1-5 p.m. 

Wed. -Sun. 

Phone 

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there's 
thiu 

Classified 



And made the first two-poinl play. 

Cal-Poly needs a rest 
And they call a time out. 
Three fans do a Can-Can 
When the band plays out loud. 

At half time they announced 
That KU had been beaten. 
The crowd was so noisy. 
They heard it in Sea ton. 

Basket by Marshall 
Basket by Barton 
And Danner, and Nealy 
And Soldner, and Blackman 

Murphy and Wills 

Were among those who scored. 

We were so far ahead, 

That the crowd was now bored 

The score was lopsided. 
The team had the potion. 
The crowd felt the players 
Were poems in motion. 




Still I photo l>y Sui- Planimiullcr 



WATCH OUT BE LOW.. .Susan Bell, senior in life sciences and recreation, 
ducks, just in case feature twirler Cindy Fangman loses control of her 
knives during halftime. 




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FOLLETT COLLEGE BOOR CO 

In cooperation with the K-State Union Bookstore 




k state union 

boohclon 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon.,Dtc«mb«r11,1978 



13 



• Jack's troops 
breeze to win 



(Continued from p. 11) 

you're pleased with Wt* made some fouls, 
purity because we probably weren't as 
sharp defensively. But you have to give Cat 
I'oly ii I idle credit, too. They were quick 
inside ." 

"I'm nol disappointed at all We're just 
no) on llic same level as K-Slate. We're 
playing hmgh opponents SO we can learn 
Mltal wecatiilii." (a I I'oly Coach Don Hogan 
said "K-Slale played a helluva game We 
didn't know they could shoot thai well from 
tin 1 outside Thai 4."> I Nealy I is all American 
material." 

"V\e talked (pi le a l»tt about being up for 
this name after we beat Minnesota," 
Suldner said. "Brent did an excellent job 
coming nil Die bench after I got into loul 
trouble.' 

"I really try to concentrate on defense,'' 
lilackman said. "I feel embarrassed if they 
score against me. 1 don't want anybody to 
come in here and score a lot on me." 

COACH IIABTMAN finished by saying he 
tell the lea in was developing anil maturing 
vc'ia well. 

K-Slate ventures into action again 
Thursday night when they play Southern 
Illinois al Kdwardsvillc in Ahearn Field 
House and then close oul their home 
schedule against non-con! erence teams 
when they play Montana on Saturday night 

Alter six Karnes, the Wildcats stand Sri 
and ha ve shown flashes nl brilliance. 

I'm I he season, the Wildcats have shot 51,7 
Item-tit from the Held while holding their 
opponents' shuttling I o:t9.4 percent. 

At the free throw line, K -State has shot 
65.2 percent compared to 63 percent by their 
opponents. 

K-Slale has outscored their foes an 
average of 77. fl points per game to B3.8 by 
their opponents 

Four players are averaging in double 
figures as Rolando Blackman leads with a 
Hi 2 scoring average. 

FRESHMAN El) NEALY is scoring at a 
ISpomt-per-game clip, while guard Glenn 
Marshall is hilling It points a game and 
Sieve Soldner is scoring 10.3 points a game. 



...come on you guys, 
play ball... 





There's more to playing basketball 
than dribbling the ball and shooting 
baskets, as Cal Poly Pomona coach 
Don Hogan makes apparent. Hogan 
gave it his all while trying to bring his 
Broncos back from a halftime deficit 
of 13 points. He finally gave up in 
disgust as the Broncos went down to 
defeat 87 71. 

Stall photos by Bo Radcf 




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know what to £i 




givc-a-book ! 

•for Birthday 
•for Christ mas 
•for Any Occasion 

The ~givc-a~book' certificate is a new promotion 
offered through the KrState Union bookstore 
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These certificates are redeemable for books at 
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0301 



14 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon., December 11,1978 



Mideast struggle continues 

Nobels awarded, but peace lags 



OSLO, Norway <AP)— Menachem Begin 
and Anwar Sadat's stand-in accepted the 
1S78 Nobel Peace Prize at a gala royal 
ceremony Sunday while 5.000 Norwegians 
marched in protest nearby and diplomats 
struggled elsewhere to keep alive the 
promise of Egyptian- Israeli peace. 

Four police helicopters rumbled over the 
heavily guarded Akershus Castle, site of the 
ceremony, as the Israeli prime minister and 
the Egyptian president, speaking through 
his representative, renewed their pledges to 
settle the Middle East conflict. 

Begin praised the Camp David 
agreements, the primary accomplishment 
for which both men received the peace 
prize, as "a good treaty of peace between 
countries that decided to put an end to 
hostility and war and begin a new era of 
understanding and cooperation.'' 

In his speech, read by personal envoy 
Sayed Ahmed Marei, Sadat said he began 
his peace initiative "because I am con- 
vinced that we owe it to this generation not 
to leave a stone unturned in our pursuit of 
peace. 

Sadat had declined to come to Oslo to pick 
up the prize personally. The official ex- 
planation was that he was busy with the 
peace negotiations, but Egyptian officials 
said privately Sadat felt he could not meet 
with Begin here while the talks are 
deadlocked because of what Cairo calls 
Israeli "stubbornness." 

Sadat instead was meeting Sunday in 
Egypt with Secretary of State Cyrus Vance, 



who was launching a new U.S. shuttle effort 
to keep the threatened peace process on 
track . 

IN STOCKHOLM, meanwhile, the nine 
other Nobel Prize winners— in the sciences 
and literature— received their awards and 
gold medals from King Carl Gustaf of 
Sweden before 1,700 guests in the city's 
concert hall. Six of the winners were 
Americans. Each prize this year was worth 
$165,000 Later, 1,200 guests attended the 
Nobel banquet. 

The downtown Oslo demonstration was 
described by Norwegian officials as the 
biggest to protest a peace prize selection in 
the award's 77 year -history. The pro- 
Palestinian protesters shouted anti-Begin 
slogans, and about 200 marchers outside the 
14th-century castle chanted, "Begin 
Terrorist! Support the PLO!" Ten 
demonstrators were arrested after scuffling 
with police. 

Inside the castle, the head of the Nor- 
wegian Nobel Committee, Aanes Lionaes, 
told the gathering of 275 guests, including 
King Olav V, that Sadat and Begin received 
the award because they "played key roles in 
the quest for peace between the two former 
enemies, which is such a source of 
gratification to true friends of peace the 
world over." 

Begin, Sadat and Lionaes all lauded 
President Carter for his role in the peace 
process. Carter was the "master builder 
responsible for the bridge that had to be 



built," the Nobel official said. 

Sadat's message opened with the 
traditional Arab greeting, "Peace be unto 
yiui, " which he said reflected I he Egyptians' 
deepest feelings and hopes, adding. "We 
always say it and we always mean it." 

He accepted the prize "as a confirmation 
of the universal recognition of our relentless 
efforts to achieve peace," Sadat wrote. 

He said the peace process "comprises a 
beginning and steps toward an end... (the) 
goal is to bring security to the people of the . 
area and the Palestinians in particular, 
restoring to them their right to a life in 
liberty and dignity." 

THE PALESTINIAN issue is the major 
obstacle to completion of a peace treaty 
between Egypt and Israel. 

The Egyptians are calling for step-by -step 
ties between the peace treaty and the 
emergence of agreed-upon Palestinian 
autonomy on the West Bank and Gaza Strip, 
while the Israelis refuse to be tied to a set 
schedule, fearing that if it is not met Egypt 
might abrogate the entire treaty. In his 
speech, Sadat said, "we will spare no effort, 
we will not tire or despair, we will not lose 
faith and, and we are confident that, in the 
end, our aim will be achieved." 

Begin said he, too, accepted the prize for 
his countrymen, terming Israel's fight for 
survival "the highest human command." 

But he added that "fighters for freedom 
hate war." 

"If through your efforts and sacrifices you 



dtoWnStOWtl byTimOowns 




DO BIRDS NEED 
A SINGING MODEL?! 
DOES THE WIND 
NEED A BLOWING 
MODEL?! DO... 




PEANUTS 



by Charles Shultz 



I'M MAKING ILLUSTRATIONS 
FOR MY BOOK ABOUT 
THE LIFE OF BEETHOVEN 




trf-» 



HERE HE 15 JUST A 
FEU MINUTES AFTER 
HE UAS BORN... 




Crossword By Eugene Sheffer 



ACROSS 

1 Barren 
5 Sarouk, 
for one 
8 Toboggan 
12 Temper 

14 Spend it in 
Florence 

15 Thinks 

18 Roman poet 

17 Samuel's 
mentor 

18 City in 
Kansas 

21 Explode 

23 Melody 

24 Dill plant 

25 Sherwood 
and Black 

28 Spanish 
aunt 

29 First rate 
(slang) 

30 Discussion, 
today 

32 Increases 
threefold 

34 Storm 

35 Eight 
furlongs 



36 Biblical 
outcast 

37 Formalist 
in teaching 

40 A loose end 

41 Armadillo 

42 Yemen, 
etal. 

47 A phase 

48 Soften by 
steeping 

49 A tax 

50 WWII 
area 

51 Delineate 



DOWN 

1 Pierre's 
friend 

2 Edge 

3 Greenland 
Eskimo 

4 To codify 

5 Hindu queen 

6 Indian 

7 Gesticulates 

8 Attractive 
to skiers 

9 Dwell 
10 Actor 

Estrada 



Average solution time: 27 min. 



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11 Art cult 
13 Young sow 

19 Unique 
person 

20 Drunken 
binge 

21 Distinct part 

22 Hindmost 

23 Pith helmet 

25 Kind of job 

26 Snare 

27 A seasoning 
29 Whirl 

31 Through 

33 Turkish inn 

34 Esteem 

38 Rich fabric 

37 Better than 
a twofer 

38 Heroic in 
scale 

39 Part of a 
pedestal 

40 Mexican 
dish 

43 Small rug 

44 Sailor 

45 Greek 
letter 

46 Stitch 




CRYPTOQUIP 12 " 

NREPQEF NRPW GNRPS GQEG FQQY 

DNSWJ GUW URYJDPRHHWN 

Saturday's Cryptoqulp - OUR NEAT SPINSTER IS 
ESPOUSED TO A FASTIDIOUS FOP. 

Today's Cryptoqulp clue \ D equals I 



win liberty and with it the prospect of peace, 
I lien work for peace because there is no 
i mss ion in life more sacred," he said. 

Begin praised Sadat's groundbreaking 
1977 I rip to Jerusalem as "shining, beautiful 
days of friendliness and understanding... in 
the spirit of the Nobel Prize tradition we 
give each other the most momentous 
pledge : no more war, no more bloodshed. 
We shall negotiate and reach agreement." 

IN STOCKHOLM, the Nobel Prize 'in 
physics was presented to Pyotr Kapitsa of 
the Soviet Union and Arno Penzias and 
Robert Wilson, both of Bell Laboratories in 
New Jersey; in chemistry to Peter Mitchell 
of Britain; in medicine to Werner Arber of 
Switzerland and Daniel Nathans and 
Hamilton Smith, both of Baltimore's Johns 
Hopkins University ; in literature to Isaac 
Has he vis Singer of New York City, and in 
economics to Herbert Simon of Pittsburgh's 
Carnegie- Mellon University. 

Widow requests 

Demos' action 
on health, ERA 

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP)— Coretta Scott 
King called on the Democratic party Sunday 
to dedicate itself to jobs, comprehensive 
health care and the Equal Rights Amend- 
ment as a memorial to her husband. 

"It is highly fitting," King told delegates 
'to the Democrats' National Conference, 
"that this session... not be dedicated only to 
my husband's memory ...but that we 
recommit ourselves to the principles he 
espoused." , 

King spoke briefly as the conference's 
closing session opened Sunday with a 
memorial service to the civil rights leader 
slain in Memphis 10 years ago. The service 
came on the 14th anniversary of King's 
acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize for his 
civil rights battle, 

Following the service, the convention 
adopted a resolution asking that King's 
birthday, Jan. 15, "be declared a national 
holiday. ..and thai all schools call attention 
to the life and messages of this great 
American," 

KING'S FATHER, the Rev. Martin 
Luther King Sr., was to be on the program 
along with his daughter-in-law and United 
Nations Ambassador Andrew Young, a long 
lime King associate But the elder King was 
reported ill and did not appear to deliver the 
in vocal ion. 

Less Ihun hall of the conventions 1,633 
delegates were in the big hall when the King 
Memorial Service began with a program of 
hymns by the city's Metropolitan Baptist 
Church choir and the Memphis Slate 
University Choral. Many stood in small 
groups and talked or read newspapers 
during the hymns, but when King began 
speaking, the hall began to fill and the 
delegates, alternates and guests became 
quiet. 

In her introduction of Young, King praised 
the ambassador for keeping her husband's 
memory alive 



Collegian 
Classifieds 



One day: 20 words or less, $1.50, 5 cenls 
per word over 20; Two days: 20 words or (ess, 
$2.00, 8 cents per word over 20; Three days: 
20 words or less, $2.25, 10 cenls per word 
over 20; Four days: 20 words or less, S2.75, 13 
cenls per word over 20; Five days: 20 words or 
less, $3.00, 1 5 cenls per word over 20- 

Clasai'ieds are payable In advance unlets client his an 
established account with Student Publications. 

Deadline Is loam day before publication. 10 a.m Friday 
for Monday paper 

Items tound ON CAMPUS can be advertised FREE lora 
period not eitceedinn three days They can be placed at Ked 
ne 103 or by call I nf) 532 6556 

OH play C !*• s Hied Rale* 

One day 12 75 par inch; Three days *2 80 par inch. Five 
dajs: 12 50 per Inch; Ten days (2 40 per inch |Deadl.ne is 5 
p m 2 d a y • be I Of e pu b 1 1 cat i on ) 

Classified advertising is available only to those who do nol 
discriminate on the basis ot race, cole*, reltolon, national 
OJloln , sex or ancestry 



FOR SALE 



MANHATTAN USED Furniture. 317 S *lb Come tn and 
browse 7764112 13 75) 

WE SELL Marantr and Phillips Tech Electronic Warehouse, 
across from Vista Drive Inn on Tullle Creek Blvd (23111 

(Continued on page 1 5) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon., D*ctmb*r 11, 1978 



15 



(Continue*! from pagt 14) 



FOR RENT 



COINS MAKE excellent gills Complete selection US ind 
Foreign, Birth year ind anniversary sell a v. 
Chest. Old Town Mall— Aggievl lie. 165 761 



CHESS SETS, hand carved, wooden and onyx. Also Chess 
tables and backgammon sets. Ideal Christmas gifts 
Treasure Ches!, Aggieviile. (65-76) 

ANTIQUE JEWELRY and watches, nice selection ot the 
classic old styles for Christmas. Old Town Mall and 
Agglavllle 185-74) 

HEATH H-8 microcomputer with 4K memory. Complete wllh 
software and documentation Will build complete system 
at a reasonable cost. 639-5B5B (68 72) 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS Tl 57 programmable calculator. $45 
Ti 25 scientific calculator. $25 Tl 59 software: Statistics, 
electronic engineering, securities and printer utility 539 
5958. (68-7!) 

SONY NR 115 professional Dolby noise reduction adapter 
One year warranty. Calibration tapes are Included for 
casssette and reel -to-reel recorders. 539-5958. (6872) 

1975 CHEVY Monze 2 plus 2. V-fl. Automatic, power steering, 
•If conditioning, one Owner. 5394345 afternoon and 
evenings. (89-73) 

METALLIC BLUE 4-door Chevy Mallbu. 57,000 miles, radio, 
air, 8 track, VS. fantastic condition, 1965, negotiable Call 
7784914 today. (89-73) 

CANON MF motor drive lor F-1 Three months old wllh new 
warranty. 532-8555. ask for Craig Chandler. (89-73) 

SNOW SKIS I Dynasler model 530, red and while, 200 cm, 
Gaze toe heel bindings, straps, good condition, $ 75. Tom. 
537,8764. (70-72) 

USED HOOVER washer. Best offer, call 778-3510. (70-72) 

AKC REGISTERED Dachshund puppies ready in time for 
Christmas Call 778-9807. evenings (70-74) 

1989 OLDS Gullass, power steering, power brakes, air con- 
ditioning, automatic, good tires, snow tires. 532-8131 ask 
forVlrgle or 1-785-3453. (7278) 

MARTIN Did qullar with hardshell case. 1350 or offer. 776- 
0048 (72-74) 



GIANT TECH 

STEREO GARAGE 

SALE 

NEW (not old stock) 
MERCHANDISE 



PHILLIPS 

Receivers 



Warehouse 



7861 45w/Ch 
7851 30w/Ch 
H784 18w/Ch 



Reg. 

$360 
$280 
$209.95 



Price 

$249.95 
$209.95 
$169.95 

$89.95 
$119.95 



Turntables 
GA437 Bit. Drv. $119.95 
AFT777 Bit. Drv. $180 

Speakers 

AH477 3Way $299.95 40% off 
AH475 2Way $139.95 40% off 
The following Marantz models will 
be sale priced. No prices shown 
here as Marantz does not approve 
of advertisement of prices this low 
on their current top merchandise. 

MARANTZ 



Receivers 


Separates 


1515 


1090 


1530 


3250 


1550 


170DC 


2216 


2100 


2226 


2020 


2238 


1152DC 


2265 




2600 




Cassette Decks 


Speakers 


5000 


900 


5025 


700's 




550's 




7 Mark II 



Mastercharge & BankAmerieard 
not accepted at these prices as 
these are cash prices only. 
—Quantities limited to stock on 

hand. 
—Entrance to garage will be 

through the main door. 



TECH ELECTRONICS 
WAREHOUSE 

Across from Vista 

Drive- Inn on Tuttle Creek 

Boulevard. 



ONE BIG Brute 10 o* magnet, one Jensen Coaxial 20 or 
magnet car speakers Best offer Call 532-3125 (7273) 

1974 DATSUN 2602 44,000 miles New tires Gold with black 
interior. 14,500. 532-8142. Jim. (72 76) 

1973 POLARE cuslom. power steering, power brakes, till, 
cruise AM FM 8 track Also, pioneer SX780 40wat1 776 
7325 (72761 

SEND SOMEONE a Collegian subscription (or Chris Imas 
Come to Kedzie 103 (72781 



TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electrics and manuals; day, week 
or month Buueils, 51 1 Leavenworth, across from post of 
lice Call 7769469 ( itl| 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS: Excellent selection. Hull Business 
Machines. 1212 Moro. 539- 793 1 Service most makes Ol 
typewriters Also Victor and Olivetti adders itStf) 

SANTA SUITS. Reserve yours now. Treasure Chest, 
Agglavllle (43-76) 

LARGE ONE bedroom furnished apartment at 221 N. Juliette 
Walar, trash, end heat paid. It 60 per month 776-3888 or 1 
456-9814.(6476) 

TWO BEDROOM basemen) apartment, furnished 
Wisher/dryer hook up. J 160 plus KPL. at 1822 Hunting, one 
rial! block from i<SU. 539-8401. (88-80) 

LARGE FURNISHED apartment at 1016 Osage, bedrooms 
and sleeping lofts, good for 3 4 people $250, bills paid. 
537-4233 166-95) 

FURNISHED BEDROOMS, kitchen and laundry facilities, 
free parking and walk to KSU 155 and up, bills paid. 537 
4233. (6695) 

LARGE. FURNISHED, two bedroom apartment. One and One 
half blocks from campus, ground floor, clean. No lease, no 
pels. 1 1 50 pi us electricity. 539-4275. (88- 721 



Villa Apartments 
526 N. 14th 

Available January 
2 Blocks from campus 



ONE-BEDROOM 

FURNISHED 

$200 A MONTH 

—No pets or children- 
Call 
537-9567 or 539- 1201 



MUST SEE this large one bedroom furnished duplex. 
Redecorated, country setting, close to town, f 185. No 
pets 7786848. (68-72) 

NEAR CAMPUS, 2 or 3 males, private rooms, nice brick 
home. 537-4283 or 539-2863. (68-78) 

NICE ONE bedroom apartment, good location Si 00, 539- 
7124.5396965.(69-73) 

ONE BEDROOM apartment, one brock weat of campus. 
Available January 1st. $130 a month. 776-1068 or 537-2522. 
(69-76) 

LARGE NICELY furnished one bedroom basement apart- 
ment, 622 Valuer St. Couple or two singles. Under f ISO 
plus electricity. No pets. 776-8055. (69-76) 



NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 

from $165 
FREE shuttle service to 
KSU 

portion of utilities paid 
adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 






PHONE 

539-2951 

or see at 
1413 CambridRe Place 



LARGE FURNISHED two bedroom, one and One half bath, 
balcony, laundry facilities, water and trash paid, Moro, 
available January 1st. 776-7746 (70-76) 

LARGE THREE bedroom house, 1104 Bluemont. Available 
January 1st. One and one half bathrooms, trash, water 
paid. 7766300 or 539-840) (70-73) 

FOUR BEDROOM house, one block from campus. Fireplace, 
large living area Available Dec 15 Phone 537-4848 (70 74| 



WILDCAT INN 

2nd Semester 

Seniors Graduating 

Make Limited Availability 

For 2nd Semester 

Occupancy 

Call 

CELESTE 

for Information 

539-5001 



ONE OR TWO bedroom baaemenl , furnished . one block from 
campus. All utilities paid One bedroom, II 60 monthly. 
Two bedroom. S200 Available now and lease until August 
1st or for one year Very clean 776-6010, 700 am -5:30 
p m , Monday through rhursdsay (72-761 

SECOND SEMESTER, studio, basement, furnished apart 
men) S1 10, all utilities paid Private entrance 1322 Pierre 
Call 539-8748 (7276) 

UNFURNISHED TWO bedroom apartmenl Close to campus 
Gas and water paid $160 month 539 3938 (72- 75) 



IOEAL FURNISHED Iwo bedroom apartment, walar, trash 
and heating paid. Close to campus Available at end of 
semester 8210 Call 538-3178. (70-72] 

ONE BEDROOM and large two bedroom apartments near 
campus Available January 1st. 537-2344. (70-76) 

BARGAIN TWO bedroom apartment al Wi ideal Creek lor 
1210 a month. Sublease will run from January i lo May 30. 
Willing lo negotiate over terms Call 776-9586 between 6:00 
p m and midnight lor more information (70-74) 

TRAILER, CLOSE to campus, clean, musl be student 
Available now to end Ol neil semester. 776-5692. (70-72) 

S1 10 WILL renl a furnished apartmenl wllh washer/dryer al 
1870 Elaine. Call 539-8 170. (71-73) 

ONE BEDROOM apartmenl available at 814 Leavenworth. 
Call 537-2002 or 539-3672. (71-75) 

SUBLEASE 

$90 TWO room apartment for only S 75 month. One half block 
from campus. Alt utilities Included, now to May 31, 1979. 
Call Daniel, 532-5854, 537-0144. (70-72) 

TWO BEDROOM trailer, furnished. Available January 1st. 
S150. Call 539-3149.(71-75) 

SHARE LARGE house Iwo blocks from campus and 
Aggieviile. Available January 1st, 180, at 1006 Valuer, 537- 
4015 after 7:00 p.m. (72-78) 

WHERE WILL you live next semester? Nail year? My lease 
ends in May I have a two bedroom trailer I walk lo work 
but there Is oil si reel parking for three or four cars. Rent Is 
negotiable Leave message at 532-5598 or write Jim 
Droege at Lol *1 420 Summit. (72-73) 

APARTMENT WITH living room, one bedroom, kitchen, bath. 
Good location No pets. Parking space galore. Call 537 
8964 after 500pm (72-74) 

SECOND SEMESTER, furnished one-bedroom apartment. 
Close lo campus. Available January tat S150, plus 
utilities Call 776*941 evenings after 7:00 p.m. (72-78) 

ROOMMATE WANTED 

FEMALES TO )ha'6 exceptional house al KSU. furnished. 
private bedrooms, S65 and up. washer end dryer, no pets, 
at 809 N If Hi 539-8401 (57-86) 

MALE TO share large house one block Irom KSU. Private 
bedroom, furnished. $70 at 1108 Bluemonl. 5398401. (66- 
95) 

NEEDED: TWO roommates lor next semester. Pels allowed. 
Cheap and close lo campus. Cell 776-3570. (8778) 

FEMALES TO share large furnished apartment. Walk to cam- 
pus. S75 month. Utilities paid. 539-2883 (87-76) 

COZY I COMFYI Private furnished room In 3 story 
house— two baths, kitchen, washer & dryer, disposal, 
microwave oven, cleaning woman. Male or female 21 years 
or older. Can move In now— rent starts January 1. $100 
plus utilities. Samara 776-6608. 169-76) 

SHARE TWO bedroom apartment in quiet, wooded area. 
Fireplace. Your halt— S150. utilities Included. 776-7298 and 
778-7181 (69-73) 

MALE TO share one bedroom furnished apartment for 
second semester, laundry facilities, swimming pool, air 
conditioning, transportation to campus S94/mon1h plus 
1/2 utilities 539-5932, keep trying (69-73) 

ONE OR two to share two bedroom apartmenl al Wildcat 
Creek with Iwo males tor spring semester 776-0643 (69-73) 

MALE ROOMMATE tor spring semester Own bedroom. Car 
peling and dishwasher Two blocks lo campus Call Steve, 
776-8163 (70-74) 

ONE OR Iwo roommates for second semester Large four 
bedroom house with laundry Moderate habits required. 
S80 per month 539-7386. (70-74) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to share large two bedroom 
apartment Furnished, fully carpeted and draped Laundry 
facilities, dishwasher, fireplace, private parking, pool and 
much more Call 5393604 (70.74) 

KANSAS CITY Female lo share very nice two bedroom, 
almosl completely furnished apartment in 
"Mission" — Kansas City. KS Convenient location right oft 
I 35, close lo Pla/a, and Westport SlSOa month, plus hall 
Ot untitles Great opportunity lor person going on block or 
graduating in December Call (9 13)362-4966. (7076) 

FEMALE TO share three bedroom house, washer, dryer Call 
after 6:00 p.m . 537-4447 ot daytime 539-7588. Ask tor Jean 
ny. (70-74) 

JANUARY FIRST, lemale to share iwo bedroom lurmshed 
apartment Iwo blocks from KSU S67 month plus elec- 
tricity Call 537 4292 (70741 

MALE, SHARE one third cosls Apartmenl one half block 
from campuB $66 per month 776 1036 (7172) 

LIBERAL FEMALE: prefer upperclass person Share two 
bedroom house, one half block Irom Weat Sladlum $80 
plus one third utilities Call 537 2945 (71-75) 

NON-SMOKING female lo share one bedroom nicely fur 
nished apartment starting 1st ot January $62.50 month 
plus one halt utilities Call 778 3502 after 5:00 p m Work 
776-5851.(71-75) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester lo share two bedroom fur 
nished trailer. $75 a month plus one half utilities. 539-3149 
(7276) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share very nice two bedroom apart 
men) close 10 campus starting January, $100 month 776- 
0926 after 5:00 p.m (72-74) 

MALE NEEDED lor next semester, furnished apartmenl one 
block from campus $60. plus very low utilities 1729 
Laramie 537-9474.(72-78) 

MALE TO share very nice one bedroom apartment for second 
semester, one and halt blocks from campus $87 50 plus 
one half utilities 537-9461 . (72-76) 

NEEDED: FEMALE for spring semester to Share furnished 
full besemenl apartment with two upperclass wo-nen 
Private bedroom Utilities Included. $75 month Call 776- 
3899. (72-76) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share luxury apartment Air con- 
ditioned, dishwasher, pool, west side $125, share ex- 
penses Call alter 6:00 p m 776-5060 (7276) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester Private bedroom, laundry. 
Four blocks from campus $75 per month plus one fourth 
utilities Call 776-3644 (72-76) 

HELP WANTED 

OVERSEAS JOBS— Summer/full time, Europe, S. America. 
Australia, Asia, etc All tlelds, $500-1200 monthly, ex- 
penses paid, sightseeing. Free Info Write: International 
J b Can ter, Bo x 4490- K 8 . Berkeley . C A 94 704 (80- 79) 

BURGER KING wants Individual to work two nights during 
Ihs week, 7:00 p.m. to 100 a.m. One weekend night 
required 7:00 p.m to 3:00 am Start 12 65 per hour $3 after 
one month. Contact Mr Wagner or Mr Nelson In person. 
(6678) 

PART TIME campus representative position avail a bis im- 
mediately Aggressive, highly motivated Individual needed 
to sell Spring Break sun and ski packages. Excellent com 
mission plus travel benefits Call Summit Travel. Inc. (3t4) 
874-61 7 1 immediately for an application. (69-72) 

MEN/WOMEN, pari lime, earn $4.88 plus per hour. Earn good 
pre-Chrislmas money Must be mature and alert. National 
Co 7767325 (7276) 

AGGIE SOUND EnlBf prises needs a DJ with I he talent lo en- 
tertain the older generation (30-100) with music ol their 
past to the present Earnings negotiable depending on ex- 
perience and willingness to advertise Work available Over 
break 776-9279 (7173) 



KEY-PUNCH operator We are seeking a qualified key punch 
operator to work part-time on our second shift (night shift) 
3742 dele entry experience desired. Starting wages— $3 pet 
hour plus shift differential Applicants are requested to con- 
tact: Employee Relations Oept The McCall Pattern Co., 615 
McCall Rd . Manhattan, KS 66502. EOE M/F (72) 

BARTENDERS AND floor walkers to work part-time Must 
work weekends Apply In person. 1216 Laramie. 1 1:00 a.m.- 
12 noon and 100 p.m dally, or phone 539-0525 tor ap- 
pointment. (70-74) 



SERVICES 

RESUMES WRITTEN from acratch. $18 end up. Also general 
typing, writing, editing. Fast Action Resumes, 415 N, 3rd, 
537-7294. (86-76) 

STEREO REPAIR, over 500 replacement styles in slock. The 
Circuit Shop, 776-1221, 1204 Moro St. (8-78) 

THE OFFSET Press prints anything resumes, brochures, let- 
terheads, posters, pamphlets, newspapers Let us do your 
next (Ob. 31 7 Houston. 776-4889. (22-tf) 

ENGAGEMENT RINGS, wedding sets. Custom designing In 
gold and silver Jewelry repair Including anlique jewelry 
Custom Jewelers, 539-3225 41 1 N Third (55-74) 



SOUPENE 
COMPUTER 

WHEEL 

ALIGNMENT 

114 South 5th Phone 776-8054 

1 i 

CHRISTMAS PORTRAITS Pastel, charcoal and pencil 
likeness Guaranteed Prices from $5 to $15. Live or from 
photo Cell 7763884 (60-76) 

WILL DO typing (I arm papers, resume*, etc.). Any type of 
malarial. Am experienced. Call 778-0088. (70-74) 

ATTEHTldti~ 

HAVE A Chrtalmas cookie and enjoy your shopping al Wind- 
tire Jewelry, 230 N. 3rd. Semi-precious gems lone 
necklaces $300. Large scenic picture Jasper bracelets 
only $31.00, regular $47 00 Tiger eye bracelets $10 67 
Crazy lace agate bracelets only $30 00 Men's solid blue 
denim coral chokers $12.00. penshell $10.00. Men's gold 
and silver natural turquoise rings 50% off. now $34 50 
Mother of Pearl stickpins $6 00. bracelets $6.00. rings, 
$8.00, necklaces $10 00 and $6 00 All handmade sterling 
silver, turquoise bracelets $8 00 to $26 00 Opal ring 14k 
gold regular $135 00, now $100.00. Opal necklaces now 
$21.00 Men's and ladles tricolor 14k gold rings 25% oft. 
Custom orders must be mads this week on Our remaining 
stones, sale prices Included: Free turquoise earrings with 
every S4S .00 purchase. (89-76) 

FOR $5.50 per hour, for each person in groups ol Ihree, will 
give local flight around Manhattan and surrounding area or 
crosscountry (lights Cruise 130 or 140 mph. Call Bob, 776 
7424 (For the faster aircraft, coat win be $1.50 more per 
hour per person. | (71 74| 

SEND A Collegian subscription to some one tor Christmas. 
Come into Ked/ie 103. We are open during the noon hour 
loo. (7276) 

NOTICES 

MANHATTAN PAWN Shop. .117 S 4th Street. 776 
6 1 1 2— stereos, B tracks. TV's, typewriters, guitars, 
cameras Buy-sell-trade (375) 

SHIPPING OVERSEAS after graduation? Call Overseas Ship 
ping Consultants lor rales and free estimate 776-5213. 
Box 895, Manhattan 16678) 

ARCHITECTURE AND design students shop hers and save, 
woodland scenics $ 1 27 Bast prices on balsa wood We've 
got what you want Tom's Hobby and Gratis 716 N 
Manhattan, in Aggieviile (72761 

SHAWNEE MISSION North High School and the Shawnee 
Mission North Parent Teacher Association will hold an 
Alumni Open House to welcome lormer graduates who are 
attending area colleges and universities Hours are from 
1:00 to 3:30 p m , Thursday, January 4. 1979 in the Gutdsn 
ca Conference Room. Come see us' (72) 

CAN'T THINK of a gill for some one? Send a Collegian sub- 
scription, come into Kedzis 103 and we will take care of II. 
(72-78) 

WANTED 

CHRISTIAN ROOMMATE for spring lerm Call 539-1513 ask 

for John (6872) 

RIDER WANTED, leaving for SE.U.S. (Florida) Wednesday 
the 20th, to share expenses Call 532-4888, ask for Lannle. 
(70-72) 

I NEED help stringing my guitar. The new strings have no 
metal bases. Please call Jennie at 532-5285. (71-72) 

NONSMOKING lemale roommate lor spring semester lo 
share apartment al Wildcat 7 with two other girls Call 776 
1925. (7278) 

RIDERS TO Edlnburg, Texaa by way of Dallas. Austin, San 
Anionic Leaving December 28 and returning January 12 
Share expenses and driving Call Larry 7764920. (72-74) 

LOST 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS SR51 A calculator If found contact 
Scolt at 5377200. evenings (7072) 

DARK BLUE backpack wllh 3 notebooks and eye glasses 
$25 reward Call 532-3500 (71 72) 

M AN 'S SEIKO watch with stop watch In locker room In gym 
Call 776-7235 (7175) 

SET OF keys, on Denlson Ave. between Fairchild and An- 
derson Avenues. Leather disc lob reads Tortilla Flats Call 
5370293 alter 3:30 or before 10:00 a.m. (7 1 74) 

FOUND~ 

BLACK GLOVES near clock by Denlson Hall To Claim call 
537-7161.(7173) 

FREE " 

PUPPIES: FREE to good hornet. German Shepherd 
Dobberman cross Call John, 776-1258 or Joel, 776-3877. 
(70-72) 

PERSONAL 

PUTNAM— IF you love me, you'll smile! Had a super time, 
lei's do It again' Love, the TEKES (72) 

DONNA K— Thanks lor being number one Mend. It's been 
wild and craxyl Looking forward to the new semester and a 
year at Justus Lelbig Sei Gut! Gutless wonder. (72) 

WULFIE AND Dee, Thanks tor being great roomies and in 
forming me ol doors, a certain group ol males and win- 
dows *5 will never be the same Remember lo go lor II 
every Nov 32. Clover, Love always, Coop (72| 



<./.:,, as f~T7 



16 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Mon, December 11,1978 



Democrats: 
stem inflation, 
Mondale says 

MEMPHIS, Term. (AP)-Vice President 
Walter Mondale warned Democrats Sunday 
that inflation is the Vietnam of the 1970s that 
will drive them from power if they fail to 
deal with it. 

"The Democratic Party in 1978 has to face 
up to the problem of inflation.. .or it will be 
driven out of office just as our predecessors 
were in 1968 by the Vietnam war," Mondale 
told the closing session of the Democratic 
midterm convention. 

Before the final session, party leaders 
moved to resolve remaining disagreements 
and bring the convention to a close with a 
show of unity behind the policies of 
President Carter. 

But budget priorities and the question of 
who in American society should bear the 
brunt of the anti-inflation campaign blocked 
all attempts to complete the show of unity. 

With his invocation of the spectre of in- 
flation, Mondale made the strongest 
statement at this convention of the ad- 
ministration's case for its determination to 
reduce federal spending. 

Trying to bring home the political danger 
of inflation, Mondale told the delegates that 
everyone who campaigned in 1978 got the 
message from the people to "get control of 
inflation." 

"Make the dollar worth a dollar. We've 
got to respond to that overwhelming plea." 
Behind the scenes, the Carter ad- 
ministration earlier yielded to pressure 
from Sen Edward Kennedy of 
Massachusetts and endorsed early enact 
menl of national health insurance. 

The president spent 18 hours in Memphis, 
addressing the opening session Friday night 
and then attending panel discussions 
Saturday morning on arms control and 
inflation. 

More jobs for 
college grads, 
new study says 

BETHLEHEM, Pa. <AP>-The job 
market for college graduates is improving 
despite a reduction in government hiring, 
according to a study by the College 
Placement Council. 

Survey results released Monday show an 
overall hiring increase of 17 percent is 
anticipated. In private business, employers 
predict a gain of 18 percent, while in the 
public sector a drop of 27 percent is ex- 
pected. 

Local and stale governments forecast a 12 
percent decline, while the federal govern- 
ment projects a 15 percent reduction, 
possibly the lowest level since the 1950s. 

The decline in government hiring comes 
from several factors, the CPC said. 
President Carter's economic program 
allows agencies to fill only one of two 
vacancies, and under the Civil Service 
Reform Act of 1978, federal civilian jobs will 
\w reduced by about 2 percent next year. 

The biggest increase in jobs, 34 percent, 
will be in engineering, a 19 percent increase 
is projected for the "sciences, math and 
other technical'' category, and an 11 percent 
gain is expected for business disciplines 




Docker's 2 



FOR 

LUNCH 

AND 
FEATURING. . . 
•DAILY SPECIALS 
•GREA T SANDWICHES 
•HOT DRINK 

SPECIALTIES 
•SALAD BAR 

FAST and CONVENIENT 

RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED 

539-9732 



B 



• t 



fc Buy-Back 



Here 
are some 
answers to 
often asked questions 




Question: 
Answer: 



How does the Union Bookstore determine how much your 
books are worth when you sell them back? 

If the Bookstore has notification from the instructor that the 
books are to be re-adopted for use the next semester, and if the 
Bookstore does not already have a sufficient stock on hand, then 
you will be offered 60 percent of the publisher's current list price. 

For example: if a book sells for $10.00 new and it meets the 
requirements noted above, the book would be bought from you for 
$6.00. 

If the Bookstore has not received notice that the book will be 
used again, or if it already has a sufficient stock on hand, the book 
would be worth the current wholesale price as indicated by one of 
the nation's largest jobbers of used textbooks. 

If you have any questions about the price being paid for a text- 
book, the buyer will be happy to answer any questions which you 
may have regarding the price paid. 



Question: 

Answer: 



Is 60 per cent the usual price paid 
for textbooks around the country? 

Definitely not. Most stores in the United States pay only 50 per 
cent for books being used again. The Union Bookstore is one of the 
few stores which pays 60 per cent And remember, we pay cash. You 
don't have to take your money out in trade. 



Question: 
Answer: 



What about paperbacks? Does the 
60 per cent policy apply to them too? 

Yes. The Union Bookstore does not penalize you on paper- 
backs. If they are being used again, and if the bookstore needs 
them, you will receive 60 per cent of the publishers list price. 



Question: 
Answer: 



If the publisher's price has gone up since I bought my books, 
will I receive the benefit of that price increase? 

Yes. For instance, if you bought your book for $9 00 and the 
publisher's list price is now $10.00, you will get $6.00, not $5.40. 



We will touy books: 




Monday, Dec. 11 

thru 

Friday, Dec. 15 
Saturday, Dec. 16 

Monday, Dec. 18 

thru 

Friday, Dec. 22 

k-state union 

bookstore 



8:15 a.m. 

to 
4:45 p.m. 

10:00 a.m. 
to 

4:00 p.m. 

8:15 a.m. 
to 

4:45 p.m. 



0301 



KAN! ft I ST/U l Hit 

TOPiKA, KS C ■ ■ BXCU 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Tuesday 

December 12, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol. 85, No. 73 



Acker, senator exchange fire 



Crofoot criticism linked to Stehley resignation 



By BRUCE BUCHANAN 
Collegian Reporter 

guest ions about restoration expenditures 
tor K Slate President Duane Acker's suite of 
Offices were raised by Stale Sen. John 
Crofoot <IM'edar Point) because of the 
resignation of Don Stehley, Acker said 
Crofoot told him Thursday. 

Stehley, who resigned effective Nov. 6 as 
associate director of the Alumni 
Association, was asked to resign by the 
alumni board. 

"He (Crofoot) called me Thursday and 



explained to me why he had raised the 
issue," Acker said Monday. "He told me 
that it was related to the Stehley affair," 

Acker said Crofoot had called him twice to 
express concern over the way the 
resignation was handled. 

"I explained that I had in no way been 
involved," Acker said. 

CROFOOT SAID Monday, however, that 
Acker's statement was only half true. 

"He's being half-factual," Crofoot said. "I 
told him that the reason it (the renovation) 



Israel and world mourn loss; 
gather to pay respects to Meir 



came to my attention was that some of the 
people who were unhappy about that 
(Stanley's resignation) said I should look 
into the expenditures on the president's 
office. ' ' 

Crofoot declined to identify those persons 

He said his motive was not personal or 
vindictive, but "it was brought to my at- 
tention by people who were being vin- 
dictive." 

Also, "it was just so obviously an 
overexpenditure of funds, I would hope any 
state senator would have done the same," 
Crofoot said. 

A statement issued by Crofoot last week 
said he had raised the issue because he 
wanted all state institutions to request 
money for major renovations project-by- 
project. 

"My comments were that 1 wanted to 
make sure that all state institutions that 



were going to have major renovations or 
remodeling projects requested these as line 
items and did not use maintenance lunds for 
other than construction that could be con- 
sidered maintenance," the statement said. 

K-STATE OFFICIALS requested money 
from the Board of Regents to aid in the 
restoration of Acker's suite of offices and 
$15,000 was appropriated for materials. The 
rest of the $36,092 came from the Univer- 
sity's maintenance fund and $63,556 in labor 
was supplied from the University's work 
force. 

"Acker is not the only one guilty of this," 
Crofoot said. "1 think this is going to make 
them (state agency heads) very careful 
about the way they spend money. 

"I'm sorry Acker was the one who was 
made an example of, but it's going to make 
the rest of them damn careful," he said. 



JERUSALEM (AP)-Tens of thousands of 
mourners filed past the flag -draped coffin of 
Golda Meir on Monday, bidding her farewell 
before her burial among Israel's military 
and political heroes. 

Meir's body lay in state outside the or- 
nately carved doors of the main entrance to 



nside 



"THE MAN NOBODY WANTED" is 

averaging 15 points per game for the 
basketball Wildcats. See Ed Nealy's 
story, page 8... 

GAS SUPPLIES may be tight next 
year, especially unleaded fuel. Details, 
page7... 



Israel's parliament, the Knesset. President 
Yitzhak Navon led the first mourners, a 
small group of relatives and friends, past 
the bier when the gates to the Knesset were 
opened Monday morning. 

The 80-year-old Meir died Friday after a 
15-year battle against lymphoma, which she 
kept secret during her years as prime 
minister from 1968 to 1974, 

The crowd, with many persons dabbing at 
tears, lined up outside the Knesset under 
overcast skies and occasional rain. 
Women's bags were searched and the men 
frisked before they were allowed to enter the 
plaza and view the coffin, raised on a five 
foot catafalque between two fiery torches. 
Burial will be on Tuesday. 

IN THE LATE evening, Lillian Carter, 
President Carter's mother, arm-in-arm with 
a female Israeli soldier, slipped through the 
(See THOUSANDS, p. 2) 



• • • 

Renovation-$64.54 per foot 



K -State President Duane Acker's suite of 
offices takes up 1.544 square feet of floor 
space, according to a release from Gene 
Cross, associate vice president for 
University Facilities. 

The president's office takes up 252 square 
feet, 16 percent of the total. 

Also included in the suite are a reception 
area, 282 square feet; conference room, 252 
square feet; secretarial area, 351 square 
feet; information assistant office and hall, 
117 square feet; mechanical room, 145 
square feet; and a file and copy room, 145 
square feet. 

"Something was done to every bit of it, 




from the floor to even the windows were 
reframed," Jim Shepard, acting assistant 
vice president of planning, said. 

Woodwork in the office is Kansas-grown 
walnut. 

The suite was carpeted and new air 
conditioning was installed to replace win- 
dow units. 

Cost per square foot for renovation of the 
suite of offices was $64.54. 

The restoration of the southeast corner of 
Anderson Hall is the start of what Acker 
said he hopes is the pattern of the eventual 
total restoration of the administration 
building. 

Automobile-train crash 
injures Manhattan man 

A 19-year-old Manhattan man was 
seriously injured in an automobile-train 
collision at the railroad crossing one block 
south of the intersection of South Manhattan 
Avenue and Yuma Street at about 4 p.m. 
Monday. 

Charles William Clark, Rt. 2, Manhattan, 
was reported in critical condition Monday 
after his car was struck by an eastbound 
locomotive and dragged an estimated 700 
feet. 

He was treated at the scene and taken to 
St. Mary Hospital, then transferred to Irwin 
Army Hospital where he underwent surgery 
at about 6 p.m. Monday. 

Clark suffered head lacerations and in- 
ternal injuries in the accident. He was alone 
in the car. 

According to the train's engineer, who 
asked to remain unidentified, Clark pulled 
his red Volkswagen onto the track in front of 
the moving train. 

Sgt Rusty Hamilton of the Riley County 
Police Department said the lights and bells 
at the crossing were working at the time of 
the accident. 

Metal rods were used to pry open the 
doors so Clark could be removed from the 
car which was struck in the right front 
fender. Hamilton said the car was totaled. 



CLEARING THE TRACKS... Riley 
County Police officers and railroad 
employees remove loose metal 
from a car that was struck at the 
South Manhattan Avenue railroad 
crossing one block south of Yuma 
Street late Monday afternoon. 

Staff pnoto by Cor) Anderson 



*#»,. n i . ■- - - <*** 'OTA 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, TiN„DM»mt»r12,1«78 



Vance urges Egypt, Israel to meet deadline 






CAIRO, Egypt (AP) -Secretary of State 
Cyrus Vance reported "good progress" 
Monday in his talks with President Anwar 
Sadat and urged Egypt and Israel to try to 
seal their long-elusive peace treaty by next 
Sunday, the deadline set at the Camp David 
summit. 

Vance, trying to find a solution to the few 
remaining problems blocking a peace 
treaty, said "some new ideas" had been 
discussed but "one or two items have to be 
further explored. ' * 

The American mediator met with 



reporters after conferring with Sadat for the 
second time in two days at the Egyptian 
leader's Nile-side villa 15 miles north of 
Cairo, and before flying to Israel for today's 
funeral for former Prime Minister Golda 
Meir. 

U.S. officials said Vance's quick trip to 
Israel is not intended as a negotiating 
mission. He is expected to return to Cairo 
today for further talks with the Egyptians, 
and then probably fly back to Israel Wed- 
nesday for meetings with Israeli leaders. 

HE TOLD reporters he hoped the Israelis 



Thousands brave cold to honor Meir 



(continued from p. 1) 
ropes and paused for a .noment with bowed 
head near the coffin , 

Upon arriving at the airport earlier in the 
day, Mrs. Carter quoted a message from the 
president, saying, "Mrs. Meir dreamed 
about peace for Israel. This is what I have 
been struggling to achieve... this peace will 
be a wonderful memorial. " 

Former Secretary of State Henry 
Kissinger, Sen. Muriel Humphrey (D- 
Minn . ), and Sen. Daniel Moynihan (D-N.Y.) 
and others from the 42-member US. 
delegation also viewed the bier. 

Secretary of State Cyrus Vance was 
scheduled to attend the funeral before 
returning to Cairo and resuming talks with 
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat. 



The Israeli army, in charge of the funeral 
arrangements, said about 4,500 persons an 
hour braved the night cold to pay their last 
respects. 

WITNESSES estimated 10,000 filed past 
during the first hour when the gates opened 
at 10 a.m. Monday. The coffin was to remain 
on view through the night until 6 a.m. 
Tuesday. 

While standing in line, many mourners 
discussed in hushed tones their personal 
memories of Meir's 50 years in public life. 

One Soviet immigrant, Yossi Michael, 
pulled a yellowed photograph of Meir from 
his wallet, taken during her days as Israel's 
first ambassador to the Soviet Union. It 
showed a young Golda Meir, with a firm jaw 
and determined gaze. 



Cam pus Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

KSU POTTE H 'S GUILD wi II nave a Ch ri itmai sale » a m 
5pm T huriday and Friday In ihe Union Courtyard, 

APPLICATIONS are being taken thwgn Friday lor ttw 
coordinated undergraduate program in dietetic*. see 
Pr.oleswi' Roach in Justin 107. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL ha* scheduled the llnal oral 
defense ol Ihe doctoral dissertation of Tiruvoor Nagaraja 
for 10 am Thursday in Call 140 

THE GEOLOGY SEMINAR SERIES presents Paul Hoi 
Iman speaking on "Straligrapttk and Structural 
Development of Aulacogens" at $>,*S pnv today in 
Thompson 101 

MEChA will sponsor a Spanish mass at ft 30 tonight at SI. 
Isidore's, apotluck dinner will follow For information call 
Janelte, J7« 781ft. 

TODAY 

ALPHA CHI SIGMA will meel in King 4 at 7 p.m. 

FCO INTEREST GROUP will meel In Justin's lounge at ft 
p m .. bring SI and canned food 

CHIMES will meet at Hibachi Nut at ft p m 

KSU RECREATION CLUB will meel in tront of Ahearn at 7 
p m to cm carolling 



KSU RECREATION CLUB will meet in the conference 
room in the basement of Moor* Hall at B ; 30 p m. 

HORTICULTURE CLUB will meet In the back of Waters al 
7 p m. to go carolling. 

DELT DARLINGS will have a Christ.. .ft* party at the Delta 
Tau Delia House at 9 p.m. 

KSUARH will meet al Smurlhwsitc at f p.m 

KSU AMATEUR RADIO CLUB will meet in Sealorv lft4K at 
7:3)pm. 

COLLEGIATE FFA will meet in Seaton 13ft at 7:30 pm. 

K _AIRES will meel at the Union parking lot doors at 7 
p.m. to go carolling 

LITTLE AMERICAN ROYAL executive committee and 
committee chairmen will meet in Coil's reading room at ft 
p.m. 

WEDNESDAY 
SOCIAL WORK CLUB olfieers will meet in Waters 229 al 
7 30 p.m. 

LAFENE STUDENT HEALTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

will meet in Latent Conference Room at 4 30 p.m. 

THURSDAY 
COLLEGIATE 4-H will meet in Moore 117 al 9 30 p.m. 



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would "approach the discussions in a 
flexible fashion." 

"We have made good progress during our 
discussions but we have not completed 
them," Vance said of his sessions with the 
Egyptians. 

He said the progress was made on two key 
stumbling blocks and dealt with "the 
possibility of interpretative notes or an 
exchange of letters on a number of items" to 
.resolve the issues. 

Egypt has insisted Israel agree to a 
timetable for setting up Palestinian self-rule 
in the West Bank of the Jordan River and the 
Gaza Strip. Israel has opposed firm 
schedules, saying the iesue is too complex 
and that if a timetable is included in a treaty 
but is not met Egypt might abrogate the 
entire treaty. 

The second dispute is over an article in the 
US-proposed draft treaty giving the 



Egyptian-Israeli pact precedence over 
Egyptian commitments to defend other 
Arab slates in time of war. Egypt opposes 
that provision, but the Israelis want to keep 
it. 

Vance said both countries "ought to try 
and wrap things up by Dec. 17, the date set 
by the parties. I'm not suggesting that will 
happen but certainly we ought to try and do 
it." 






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CHARLES SCOTT 

Attorney for Plaintiffs in 

Brown vs. Board of Education 

.... will speak on the meaning of the 
Epochal Supreme Court Decision on: 

/ \ 

Tuesday, December 12, 1978 

4:00 p.m. in 

Eisenhower 15 

Sponsored by Department of History 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tue„ Dec«mb«r 12, 1978 



Briefly 



Body snatchers— something to hide? 

VEVEY, Switzerland— Two men told a court Monday they acted 
alone to steal the body of Charlie Chaplin. But a judge hinted the 
body snatchers might be protecting someone in the bungled ransom 
plot. 

Roman Wardas, 24, of Poland, and Bulgarian-born Gancho 
Ganev, 38, admitted their guilt in the macabre scheme, saying they 
felt the March 1 theft would earn them a share of the reported $100 
million the world-famous comedian left his family. The refugees 
insisted no one else was involved. 

Wardas said he was the man who called the Chaplin family home 
and family attorneys over a 10-week period to negotiate a ransom. 
He was arrested in a telephone booth while making a ransom call. 

But Chaplin family lawyer, Jean-Felix Paschoud, testified five of 
the dozens of calls he received appeared to be from a different man. 
That prompted presiding Judge Roland Chatelain to speculate a 
third man may still be at large. 

"Rochat"— -the name Wardas admitted he used in his calls— "was 
always polite," the lawyer said. 

Move over, N.Y. here comes Cleveland 

CLEVELAND— Cleveland's city council president said Monday 
that the city's default is a foregone conclusion and bankruptcy is 
around the corner. But the finance director said the city has a plan 
lo avoid default. 

If Cleveland does default on notes by this weekend— as city 
council president George Forbes said it will— it would be the first 
major American city to do so since the Depression. 

Finance Director Joseph Tegreene met Monday with local 
bankers, who hold $15.5 million in notes that must be repaid or 
refinanced Friday. 

New York airport thieves net $5 million 

NEW YORK— Five heavily armed men overpowered a guard and 
nine workers at a high-value cargo area of Kennedy International 
Airport on Monday and made off with an estimated $5 million in 
cash and jewels, authorities said. 

The robbers— brandishing a shotgun, a pistol and three 
revolvers— beat a guard and bound him and the nine other workers 
at the Lufthansa Airlines cargo area, authorities said. They said one 
worker was forced to reveal the combination to a safe. 

Some $3 million in American money being flown from Frankfurt, 
Germany, to the Chase Manhattan Bank here was reported stolen, 
and a policeman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, 
which operates the airport, said it was believed jewels also were 
involved. He put the value of the goods at close to $5 million. 

But hours after the robbery, detectives still were trying to 
determine exactly how much was taken. "They're still counting," 
one police officer said. 



Soldier charged with manslaughter 



filed 



TOPEKA— A charge of voluntary manslaughter was 
Monday against Ricky Alexander, 21, a Fort Riley soldier. 

Alexander was accused in connection with the weekend stabbing 
death of Eugene Johnson, 27, of Topeka. 

Police said Johnson, Alexander and several others were riding 
together in a car from an east side Topeka residence to a restaurant 
Saturday night when an argument developed. 

The stabbing occurred in the restaurant's parking lot after they 
arrived, police said. Johnson was taken by friends to the hospital 
where he died a short time later. 

Ebony honors black achievers 

LOS ANGELES— U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Mar- 
shall, U.N. Ambassador Andrew Young and the chairman of the 
board of the nation's largest black bank were honored at the 
American Black Achievement Awards. 

The first annual awards, presented by Ebony Magazine, 
recognized black Americans who are the embodiment of "what 
black Americans can achieve and have achieved given an equal 
opportunity," said magazine publisher John Johnson. It was the 
first time the awards were given and they are planned as an annual 
event. 

Also honored were columnist-commentator Carl Rowan; Rev. 
Jesse Jackson; heavyweight champion Muhammad AH; George 
Johnson, president of Johnson Products and chairman of the board 
of the nation's largest black bank, actress Cicely Tyson and singer- 
songwriter Stevie Wonder. 



WeatFier 



Today and Wednesday will be mostly clear and mild. Highs today 
will be in the mid to upper 50s. Wednesday will be cooler with highs 
in the mid to upper 40s. 




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Opinions 



Crossing off safety 

The inevitable crosswalk accident that has just been waiting to 
happen in this town finally did. A man was run down Sunday night at 
the heavily used crosswalk at the intersection of Anderson Avenue 
and Mid Campus Drive. The unfortunate pedestrian, who was taken 
to the hospital with head injuries, could have lost his life because of 
the unchecked carelessness of a driver and negligence on the part of 
city planners. 

As has been stated on this page before, it is past time for traffic 
lights to be installed on the crosswalks leading to campus. It has 
been made painfully apparent that car drivers cannot be relied 
upon to stop for pedestrians in crosswalks, in accordance with the 
law. Equally apparent is the unwillingness of the police to enforce 
that law. 

For far too long students on their way to campus have had to wait 
at crosswalks for a break in traffic. Often the only way to get across 
is to go ahead and step out into the street, trusting drivers to stop in 
time. The danger is increased at night because inadequate lighting 
makes it difficult for drivers to see people in the crosswalks. 

As is often the case with this sort of situation, no remedial actions 
are taken by authorities until injury or death provide overwhelming 
justification. Now that an injury has occurred, it is hoped a death 
won't be necessary to drive home the point. 

SCOTT STUCKEY 

Assistant Editorial Editor 



Small talk 



It is difficult to think of a topic for a final 
column. If it hadn't been for Mishkosh, this 
column might not have been written. 

Mishkosh is the elf who lives outside my 
back door. He claims he doesn't feel the 
cold, but 1 noticed his face turning blue the 
other day and invited him in for a cup of tea. 
We got to talking and he presented me with 
so many new ideas, I felt I should pass them 
on. 

You must understand, Mishkosh is about 
two feet tall, wears a pointed hat with a bell 
on the end, a green and yellow fur-lined 



Ka y Coles 



jacket and orange slacks. His feet rest in 
tiny green slippers with turned-up toes. He 
spent the better part of the afternoon telling 
me how difficult life is for elves. 

"Elves are looked down on, both literally 
and figuratively," he said. "We are laughed 
at and discriminated against. An elf cannot 
even drink from a drinking fountain or visit 
a public bathroom All the world is so big, no 
thought is given to the plight of us little 
people. We don't have equal rights. Few 
people even believe we exist and if they do, 
they certainly don't listen to our demands. 

"The job market isn't terrific for elves. No 
one seems to believe that we are good 
workers, although records of employed 
elves show we are sick fewer days than the 
average worker. 

"We even have a rough time at school. 
The desks aren't the right size and we tend 
to get lost in the crowd. Textbooks are so 
heavy that we can't bring them home at 
night. We can't even carry them out of the 
library 

"Then," he said, "the people we do meet 
think we must work for Santa Claus. Such 
misconceptions are so prevalent that we 
have almost given up trying to com- 
municate with 'big people.' I never have 
wanted to work with Santa and I wouldn't 
have the faintest idea about how to make a 
toy. It seems so strange to us that all of you 
form such notions and then aren't willing to 
open your minds to another way of 
thinking." 

A large, wet tear formed in his eye and for 
a while 1 was afraid he was going to cry. But 
he seemed to pull himself up and he con- 
tinued. 

"But 'big people' aren't really so bad. 
Most of the people whose doors I've lived 
beside were nice to me, though they've 
never really understood my problems. The 
hardest problem seems to be breaking 
through their already formed opinions. Why 
can't 'big people' open their minds to new 
ideas or new people? " he asked me. 

1 really didn't know what to say. 1 tried 
explaining to him that people just are afraid 
of new ideas. They are comfortable with the 
old ways of thinking and don't want to 
jeopardize their comfort. He sighed. 



"There is so much to learn,'' he said. "If 
people could just open their minds as well as 
their hearts, a whole new world could open 
up to them. Their lives would be so enriched 
by just thinking about new ideas that they 
would then wonder why they didn't try it 
before. 

"Maybe that's why you 'big people' have 
so many difficulties and so many wars," he 
said "Perhaps if all of you could get 
together without any barriers, say in a dark 
room, where no one could guess the religion 
or race or sex of anyone, maybe then you 
could all live in harmony." 

I agreed that it seemed like a good idea. 
Then I tried to explain to him that people 
already have built so many barriers bet- 
ween them the idea just isn't feasible. I told 
him 'big people' just aren't interested 
anymore in creating harmony; their main 
concern is inflation. 

"I understand about the economic 
troubles everyone is experiencing, but I 
guess I just don't understand about the 
barriers. We elves long ago mandated equal 
rights for all ethnic groups and sexes. And, 
you know, we've prospered from it. After 
several generations, we've realized what 
great contributions the female elves and 
the minority groups can make to our 
society. And we don't live in a society 
controlled by ethnic groups, nor one which 
is, as you people call it, uni-sex. We live in 
great peace and brotherhood." 

"Now if we could just overcome the 
stereotype which your society has put on us, 
our lives would be fulfilled," he said. "I 
guess, though, that will be a long time away. 
Maybe if we begin our fight now, by the time 
my grandchildren are grown, they will be 
accepted into society." 

I told him I would try to help. He thanked 
me and then said he must get back home. 

"Merry Christmas," he said as he went 
out the door. "And remember, I don't make 
toys." 



*£S Collegian"'™' 

Tuesday, December 12, 1976 

THE COLLEGIAN is published by Student 
Publications, Inc., Kansas State University, daily 
except Saturday. Sundays, holidays and vacation 
periods 

OFFICES are in the norm wing of Kediie Had. phone 
532 4SS5 

SECOND CLASS postage paid at Manhattan, Kansas 
MS01 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

17 50, one semester 



SIS. one calendar year. 




ssr-'r 



'STAWD tyr* * 111 BE «RGD TO TjRN ?4S UTTlE WGElS UXSE CM 
10UR LOUSY. mZH PCWN PU0UC EpUOTiJW "JffEM ' ' 



Paroled at last 



After eight years of textbooks, cramming 
for finals and teachers who fancy them- 
selves as punsters, I am finally leaving. 

That's right : I said I was leaving! 

Eight years ago I started out as a very 
idealistic neophyte academician. 1 guess 
you might say I had my life pretty much 
planned out as far as what I was going to do. 

Back in the good old days I was an an- 
thropology major. I even managed to get a 
degree in the field. 

But, as fate would have it, jobs in the 



Per yn CominsEy 



anthropology field are about as abundant as 
dodo birds these days. 

So, with my sheepskin in hand I embarked 
on a three and a half year tour of the 
working world. 

The first fulfilling job I managed to land 
was driving a taxicab right here in this good 
old college town. 

That in itself was one hell of an education. 
Having to put up with everyone from your 
sleaziest drunk to the sweetest old ladies 
taught me to at least cope with real people. 

The next job 1 managed to land was as a 
security guard at an old age home in Boston. 
I remember I had to work from midnight to 
8a, m„ six nights a week, 

I can't really say that I learned a whole lot 
from that experience, nor can I say that it 
did wonders for my attention span, but it 



paid the rent and I did manage to knock off 
three epics by James Michner, 

My next attempt at living in a world I was 
totally prepared for was driving a taxicab in 
of alt places. New York City. That was even 
more educational than driving a cab back in 
the old cornfields, since you tend to find 
more sleazy drunks than you do sweet old 
ladies. There was at least one highlight to 
the job which I doubt I will ever forget. That 
was the night 1 picked up Mr. Green- 
jeans— you remember the guy from the 
Captain Kangaroo show. 

I guess 1 finally got fed up with the real 
world for a while and decided to give college 
and the idealistic life a shot again. 

Having several friends who are already 
raking in the bucks as doctors, lawyers and 
engineers I seriously thought about those 
fields. But since I don't much care for the 
sight of blood, have a negative aptitude in 
science and math, 1 immediately discounted 
them. 

Then, by either sheer luck or the influence 
of Lou Grant, I still can't discern which, I 
decided to enter the realm of journalism and 
write about the characters I met and take 
potshots at politicians. 

After three semesters and another degree 
I managed to land a job that I was trained 
for, wriUng for a newspaper. 

I'll admit that the paper I'm going to work 
for is not the New Vork Times, but at least 
it's a start and gives me peace of mind to 
know that eight years of persistence and 
idealism paid off. 



Letters 



If pigs had wings... 



THE COLLEGIAN functions in a legally autonomous 
relationship with the University and is written and 
edited by students serving the University community 

Paul Rhodes, Editor 
Terry Brungardt. Advert«smg Manager 



Editor, 

Ke: David Beckwith's letter against nuclear 
power 

In regards to his first argument that 
nuclear is also non-renewable like oil— we 
can build breeders which "breed" fuel. 
Nuclear will last a lot longer than oil, giving 
us time to develop other alternatives and 
lessen our dependence on the Middle East. 

Secondly, he says there's a big threat of a 
meltdown. Architects don't think up the 
safety devices for a nuclear power plant; 
scientists do. He can give no examples of 
even one meltdown, or even one person 
killed. If he would look at the statistics, he 
would see that nuclear has the lowest 
potential of a worker being killed in a plant 
per unit of energy produced— this takes into 
account the fact that nukes haven't been 
around as long. 

A meltdown, if it happens, would do 
(hat-melt down. Indeed, the biggest 
possible problem is that it would melt down 
to China, but no radiation would kill U.S. 
citizens. Beck with doesn't mention fusion, 
which has no possibility of a meltdown. If 
pigs had wings they would fly, but they 
would be very unlikely birds. 

Thirdly, security. There isn't enough 
plutonium in a reactor for a bomb. Even if 
terrorists could get it, did David ever think 
they would be dead from the radiation 
before they got out of the plant? The 
uranium would have to be enriched before it 
could be used. If the boogie man had this 
capability, he could also mine it themselves, 
so what? 

Fourthly, waste. David says it can be 
disposed of safely— so write and tell your 



Congressman! Again, he leaves out fusion, 
which has no significant radioactive waste. 

Fifthly, consumption patterns. If he 
doesn't like them, then start a crusade. 
Consumption is down now that people are 
more energy conscious. If we have adequate 
supplies of energy, why not use them? 

A point David doesn't really consider is 
what will we do when all nuclear power 
plants are "blocked" and we either run out 
of oil or are entirely dependent on the 
Arabs? Only a really nascent person would 
advocate the latter, considering the 
disastrous impact when the supply is 
stopped, either by the Arabs in another 
embargo or the Kussians in a war. 

But his remarkable advice is to "split 
wood, not atoms." This is ludicrous. David 
wants to take us back to the 18th century! 
I'll go nuclear and an assured, reasonable 
and .modern future— David can go design 
and live in a log cabin. 

Komi \ Bakei 
freshman in engineering 



The Collegian welcomes letters from 
readers concerning the content of the 
paper, or any comments on either 
national or local issues. 

All letters must be signed and include 
proper identification, including title or 
classification, major and telephone 
number. No anonymous letters will be 
printed. 

Letters may be submitted (preferably 
typed) in Kedzie 103 or the editorial desk 
in the newsroom. 



High court to decide 
if hiring policy unfair 



WASHINGTON <AP)— The Supreme 
Court said Monday it will decide whether 
employers with no proven history of racial 
bias illegally discriminate against whites 
when giving preferences to minority 
workers. 

In a case that may dwarf the court's 
Bakke ruling of last June in its impact and 
affect millions of Americans, the justices 
agreed to hear three appeals stemming 
from a Louisiana job-discrimination 
lawsuit. 

The justices' eventual decision likely will 
be reached sometime before next July, after 
arguments are heard. 

Brian Weber, a white employee at Kaiser 
Aluminum & Chemical Co.'s Gramercy, 
La., plant, charged that an affirmative 
action program begun by Kaiser made him 
a victim of "reverse discrimination." 

Two lower federal courts ruled that the 
program aimed at landing more blacks in 
higher-paying jobs was illegal because it 
fostered racial bias against Weber: 

In Gramercy, Weber expressed con- 
fidence the court would agree with his 
contention. 

"It's been a long time coming— it's been 
almost four years since the suit was filed 
and I didn't expect to get near this status," 
he said . " I would ha ve been satisfied to have 
it resolved at any time this last four years, 
but 1 guess it's too important to be settled 
this early." 

IN A FLURRY of action Monday, the 
court also : 

—Agreed to decide whether police may 

Explosions, fire 
sweep oil depot 
in Rhodesia 

SALISBURY, Rhodesia (AP)— A huge fire 
broke out Monday night after a series of 
explosions at the main storage depot of four 
major oil companies about five miles from 
the center of Salisbury . 

The fire began at about »:is p.m. local 
time— 1 : lf> p.m. CST— and was still burning 
90 minutes later. There were no immediate 
reports of casualties. 

A police spokesman said the fire started 
after a small explosion that was followed by 
other explosions. The fire raised suspicions 
of sabotage by black nationalist guerrillas 
who are stepping up their six -year war 
against the Salisbury government. Police 
and lire officials refused comment. 

"We have our ideas about what caused 
this but we cannot say anything just now," a 
police officer said. 

The depot, next to a fertilizer factory that 
is packed with explosive nitrates, stores oil 
for Shell, British Petroleum and Call ex, 
which is jointly owned by Standard Oil of 
California and Texaco. The Rhodesian 
operations claim to be independent of their 
foreign namesakes. 

It was not immediately known what im- 
pact the fire would have on Rhodesia's 
scarce oil supplies, which are shipped in 
from South Africa in violation of in- 
ternational sanctions imposed because of 
Rhodesia's racial policies. 

The blaze lighted up the Salisbury skyline 
and could be seen fur ID miles. The depot is 
in the heart of the city's light industrial area 
between a black township and a primarily 
Indian area. 




/a ninr m 

i mm . . . 



IUSB 



Take • break . , . and Join u» lot lunch 
or dinner at Vlata Drive-in. Register, 
while you're hew. (or one ot ien 
beautiful polneettiat to be fllven away 
on December 20th I 

pnbnwniA* tanKMmr » F>*«<rt» 

WW IMIDOT MM 

" Drive-In, 

1911 Tuttle Creek Boulevard 



question criminal suspects who do not 
specifically relinquish— either orally or in 
writing— their rights to remain silent and 
obtain a lawyer's help. 

The court thus set the stage, in a case 
from North Carolina, for an important in- 
terpretation of its controversial Miranda 
ruling, which requires police to warn 
suspects of their rights before questioning 
them. 

—Refused to hear the appeal of two 
Connellsville, Pa. , ( library employees who 
were fired because they live together though 
not married. 

City commission 
takes night off 

The city manager's office announced 
Monday that the Manhattan City Com- 
mission will not meet tonight. 

According to Don Harmon, city manager, 
the commission is legally required to meet 
only twice a month; since there is very little 
business lo take care of with the holidays 
approaching, the commission decided not to 
meet. 

Cily commissioners met last Tuesday and 
will meet again on Dec. 19. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tor, D»c«mt»M2, 1B78 



Congratulations 



The Donrey Media Group proudly 

congratulates its 1978 Intern of the Year 

Award recipient: 



Douglass K. Daniel 

Senior, department of journalism 
and mass communications 




Donrey Media Group 

920 Rogers Avenue 

Fort Smith, AR 72901 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



DEAD WEEK 

SPECIALS 
ALL WEEK! 

(Mr. K's Care Package For You! ) 



WHITE STAG 

ACTION SPORTS 



Men's & Women's 



SKI JACKETS 
( Vi Price ) 




TUESDAY 



• ON AU BEVERAGES 

(except carryout) 7:30-9:30 

• 25' ADM. 



Be Watching For Tomorrow's Special! 



MRjK-S 



fe union bookstore 

'0X0X0 





That's right! The Union Bookstore's used 
book program saved K -State students better 
than $250,00000 this year That's more than 
$13.60 a student! How did we do it 7 By using com 
mon sense Instead of sending big checks off to 
the publishers for our textbook stock, we prefer 
to put it in your hands in cash when we buy your 
books. It makes sense, the savings add up fast, 
and what's more, we've been doing it for you for 
years As a result, the average students book ex- 
penses are reduced by about one-fifth. 

Here are the details: First, we pay 20% more 
for your books than is currently available at 
other dealers. Second, these exceptionally high 
prices attract a lot of books— literally* tons of 
them, so our stocks are the largest in Manhattan, 
bar none' (One out of every three course books 
sold at the Union this year was a used book. ) 
With such a high volume of used copies 

Iff] k state union 

LMlJ bookstore 



available, and since you save twice on used 
books ( once when you but it, and again when you 
sell it) it is easy to see why the net result is such 
a huge savings. It's a fact that the Union puts 
more cash in the hands of K-State students than 
anybody else in the book business. You couldn't 
save more if you bought all new books at 
wholesale! 

So why are we buying this ad? Not just to 
blow our own horn We figure that if you know 
the facts, you can save yourself a lot of money. 
So we bought this ad to convince you that there 
are only two simple steps to save money on your 
textbooks ' 

I. Sell your books at the Union— you save 

because we pay more. 

2 Buy your books at the Union— you save 
because we have more used books. 

So, gather up all those books lying around 
the apartment or dorm room, and sell them at 
the Union (jnjront of Forum Hall) From Dec. 11 
Thru BecJ2 Then, come see us again 
during registration. Remember, we save you 
more, and we can prove it. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Tu... 0«ctmb«r 1 2, 1 »7« 



Iran explodes with violence after 2 peaceful days 



TEHRAN, Iran (AP)— Two days of peace 
between the government and anti-shah 
protesters exploded into violence and 
bloodshed Monday in the ancient city of 
Isfahan, where at least five persons were 
reported killed when soldiers fired on 
rampaging crowds. 

In Tehran, hundreds of thousands of fist- 
waving Iranians streamed through the 

Wichita officials search 
for triple murderer 

WICHITA (AP)— Funeral services for 
Wichita band leader Norman Lee and his 
wife, Pat, were held Monday while 
authorities continued an investigation into 
their murders. 

As the two were being eulogized at a 
jammed St. Mary's Cathedral, Sedgwick 
County Sheriff Johnnie Darr and District 
Attorney Vern Miller were out of town 
searching for a former musician who is a 
prime suspect in the shooting deaths of the 
Lees and an employee of Lee's, Bob King. 
Their bodies were discovered in Lee's home 
Friday. 

"All I can tell you," undersheriff Sam 
Davison said Monday, "is that they're 
following up on some information which 
they got yesterday." 

A source quoted by the Wichita Beacon 
said the investigators went to New Orleans 
to check some hangouts of the suspect, a 
former musician in Lee's band whom, the 
sources said, had threatened Lee in the past 
and left the Cotillion Ballroom last Wed- 
nesday night after Lee's wife refused to 
dance with him. 

Lee, his wife and King were shot to death a 
few hours later. 

The funeral Mass for the Lees was con- 
ducted with the two polished wood coffins 
resting in the center aisle of the crowded 
cathedral The eulogy was given by the Rev. 
Jim Hoagland of Council Grove. 

Among the mourners was Kansas 
Lieutenant Governor-elect Paul Dugan. 



streets chanting "Down with the shah!" in 
the second mass protest march in two days. 

After the march ended peacefully and 
night fell, the government reasserted its 
authority, sending tanks and troops back 
into the center of the city and reinstating a 
full curfew and ban on demonstrations. 

Official sources said the violence in 
Isfahan, 300 miles south of Tehran, began 
when a similar protest march turned into a 
riot. They said thousands of demonstrators 
badly damaged downtown banks and public 
buildings, including the headquarters of the 
SAVAK secret police, and toppled statues of 
Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and his 
father, Shah Reza the Great. 

Troops moved in, first using tear gas, then 
opening fire with their rifles to disperse the 
crowds, these sources said. Early reports 
said at least five were seen killed in 
Isfahan's main square and many wounded. 

REPORTS from the provinces said 



marchers also attacked banks and public 
buildings in three other cities, and in each 
city statues of the shah were torn down. 
There were no immediate reports of 
casualties from those cities, however. 

Reliable sources said anti-shah rioters 
stormed the U.S. -owned Hyatt Hotel in the 
northeastern city of Mashhad on Sunday, 
wrecked the ground floor and made an 
abortive attempt to set the hotel's nightclub 
on fire. No casualties were reported. 

At the Tehran demonstration, a huge 
throng massed around the towering, arch- 
like Shahyad monument— end point of the 
march and symbol of the shah's rule— was 
told by opposition leaders, "We will continue 
until victory is won! " 



The Tehran marchers took over the center 
of the city, parading down main avenues. 
The military-led government had with- 
drawn its troops and tanks from downtown 
Tehran to avoid a bloody showdown in the 
streets. 

A proclamation read by opposition leaders 
demanded "the fall of the dictatorial 
monarchy" and the establishment of an 
Islamic government under the exiled 
Ayatullah Ruhollah Khomaini, head of 
Iran's dominant Shiite Moslem sect and 
leader of the anti-shah movement. 

The proclamation called for "an end to 
foreign exploitation... by imperialists of 
East and West." 



(BUSINESS SENIORS 

Interested in Resume Booklet ' 

Pick Up Data Sheet For 

CBA Resume Booklet In 

Dean's Office In Calvin 

By Wed., Dec. 13th 

Have Them In 
By Fit, Dec. 15th 

(Form Is Identical To 
Placement Centers) 




Santa has 
the perfect 
gift idea. . , 

Let Santa 's helpers 

at Holiday Jewelers 

help you select your 

perfect Keepsake 

diamond ring 

this Christmas! 




JttPOVNTZ MANHATTAN. KANSAS 



/ ■ 



you say you don't 
know what to give... 




give~a-book ! 

•for Birthday 
• for Christmas 
•for Any Occasion 

The givc-a- book' certificate is a new promotion 
offered through the KrState Union bookstore 
in cooperation with the American Booksellers 
Association and the National Association of 
College Stores. 

These certificates are redeemable for books at 
face value at any one of over 700 participating 
bookstores nationwide. 



Its the perfect gift ! 



! 




k-state union 

bookstore 




0301 






KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tut, PWWKl 12,197« 



-Gasoline 'market disruptions' 
forecasted by energy official 



r 



WASHINGTON < AP)-Supplies of 
unleaded gasoline will probably be tight 
next year and "market disruptions" are 
likely by 1982 unless gas prices are 
deregulated. Deputy Energy Secretary John 
O'Leary told a congressional committee 
Monday. 

O'Leary said, however, the current supply 
problems of four refiners do not reflect a 
general nationwide shortage of gasoline at 
the moment. 

He testified at a Senate Energy Com- 
mittee hearing called to investigate whether 
the oil industry is manipulating supplies to 
raise prices. 

Shell Oil Co. announced last month it 
would ration supplies of unleaded gasoline 
to its wholesalers and retailers. Texaco, 
Conoco and Arco also have indicated supply 
problems, 

O'Leary said an Energy Department 
investigation shows the problems of those 
refiners "appear to be unique and are not in 
themselves an indication of a general supply 
shortage." 

But in surveying major refiners, O'Leary 
said, he found that if demand for motor fuel 
remains as high as it has been and stocks 
are not replenished, "supplies might be 
tight by next summer.. ..There is going to be 
a very tightly tailored market." 

HE SAID refiners are producing all the 
gasoline they can, but "American motorists 
are not conserving. " 

Unless price controls are lifted or some 
other similar action taken, O'Leary said, 
"Weare going to be in deep trouble by 1982." 

In 1972, he said, there was no unleaded 
gasoline, which is sold primarily to meet 
increasingly tough federal environmental 
standards. 

Explosives found 
by police search 

GREAT BEND lAP)— Six hundred 
pounds of dynamite and 400 blasting caps 
Stolen almost a week ago from a geological 
exploration company were recovered 
Sunday night. 

The Barton County Sheriff's office, Great 
Bend police and the Central Kansas Nar- 
cotic Unit recovered the explosives from an 
abandoned storm shelter eight miles 
southeast of Great Bend. 

Leonard Mastroni, narcotics unit 
supervisor, said the 10-county drug unit was 
asked to help with the investigation 
Saturday when it was learned that the ex- 
plosives were going to be used as part of a 
trade involving drugs in the area. 

Information provided to the narcotics unit 
by a confidential source allowed retrieval of 
the explosives, valued at about $1,800. 

Detective Kirk Thompson of the sheriff's 
office said it was believed all the explosives 
taken Dec. 5 from a Barton County storage 
vault of Exploration, Inc., of Wichita, were 
recovered. 

No arrests have been made in the case. 



This year, he said, unleaded gasoline 
makes up 36 percent of the gasoline market. 
By 1980, that figure is expected to rise to 50 
percent. 

O'Leary made no predictions for shor- 
tages or tight supply of leaded gasoline used 
in older cars 

As explained by O'Leary and oil company 
executives who testified, the current tight 
supply of unleaded gasoline is the result of 
an extraordinarily warm fall this year and 
unexpected problems with the air pollution 
equipment on new cars. 

Many motorists who bought new 1977 cars 
believe they drive smoothly only with high 
octane, unleaded gasoline, the only type of 
unleaded fuel now sold by Shell and two 
other producers. 



EVERY MAN A 
WILDCAT NIGHT! 

Come celebrate the Cat's victory 

after the game! Show your K-Stare 

B-Bal ticket & mm 

1.75 pitchers, '.50 draws. 



MEW! 

A NICOTINE-FREE, 
TOBACCO-FREE SMOKE 

Now you can smoke when you want 

to— not when you have to, with a 

revolutionary new product called 

FREE. Made from the tender outer 

layer of the cocoa bean, FREE is a 

non- habit -forming, low tar brand 

that delivers a great new flavor 

and aroma. 



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Regular and Menthol 



Exclusively At 




€•■■ 




417Poyntz 776-4303 



You Only Have | 

4 Days 

To Register 

For The FREE 

Weekend In The Rockies 



Register and pick up details at 

"The Fashionable 
Shopping Address' 




Downtown Manhattan 
OPEN TONIGHT TILL 8:30 




u 



save 
some 

beauty 




Recycle 



strings n things 



MUSIC STORE 



COUPON 



I 



Bring in and receive 
15% OFF any purchase 
over $ 5.00 



(Offer expires Dec. 31, 1978 and does not 
include items already discounted). 



strings 'n things 




Across from Kites-Aggieville 539-2009 




SSSSS 

DtaW"*-* urn, 

n Yo» r sq ° 

nYourtM»et»* ,leo 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tu*. December 12,1878 




Stall photo bv Craig Chandltr 

BATTLE ON THE BOARDS.. .Freshman standout Ed Nealy battles for a 
rebound with Cal Poly-Pomona's Don Johnson during last Saturday's 
game. 

Man nobody wanted 
finds home at K-State 



By IOIIN DODDERIOGE 

Collegian Reporter 

Starting lor the K -State basketball team in 

your freshman year is unusual in Coach 

Jack Hartman's book. 

But there are exceptions, as in the case of 
Ed Nealy, a 6-7 forward from Bonner 



Sports 



Springs, who has started every game for the 
Wildcats so far this season. 

Nealy is currently the leading rebounder 
and second leading scorer for K-State after 
the first six games. 

Basketball was Nealy's major interest 
last year while he was averaging 28 points a 
game for Bonner Springs, in addition to 
competing in football and golf. 



"My first interest when I decided on 
where I would go to college was which 
school had the best basketball program for 
me," Nealy said. 

Nealy attended Jack Hartman's 
basketball camp the summer after his 
junior year, which gave K-State a head start 
in the recruiting battle for Nealy. 

K-STATE WAS the only area school to go 
after Nealy, while he was the number one 
prospect for Yale. 

Yale wanted Nealy not only for his skills 
on the court, but in the classroom. 

Nealy was a slraight-A student in high 
school and is a dual major in engineering 
technology and business. 

"I came to K-State to not only play 
basketball, but to get a good education," 
Nealy said. 

After being held to six points in the season 
(See NEALY p. 9) 




InoonerI 





Students Entertaining Students 

ft, ■ ■ in,. 

rTtfanTfig 

DECEMBER SESSION 

Jtez-RoeJt Muttckms 
In to Dw 

K-State Union Csfebfer 

TODAY! 12:00-1:00 p.m. 



MERRY CHRISTMAS 

now 

UPC Coffeehouse! 






sVlllllllltlllllHllllllllllimil. 



SIS N. 12th 




the past revisited 

THE GIFT THAT KEEPS ON GIVING 

A MMBBKHP 10 AUNTIE MAPS PARLOR 

r 



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Just erf 539-0525 and nit us to sen* 1 pa an 



luijiHiuiBimwijiiHiii^ 







\SWING DANCi 

featuring 

COUNTRY JOY 



Friday, December 15, 1978 

9 pm — 1 am 

National Guard Armory 

Manhattan Airport 

•Dance Lessons 8-9 pm 
•Dance Contest seo in prizes* 
•Door Drawing $15 in prizes* 



* Gift Certificates Courtesy of 

$2 50 

per person 



WESTERN CLOTHIERS 



BYOB 

3.2 beer only 
T.T. Productions 






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BATTERY SALE 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tim., DK«mb«i 12, 197« 



It's freezing outside 
so let's go fishing 



By KELLY SWOFFORD 
Collegian Reporter 

Looking for a new study break? Or is your 
refrigerator drastically devoid of food? If 
so, 1 have the answer for you. 

Grab some Velveeta cheese or salmon 
eggs. No, not to eat. Bundle yourself up in 
layers of long underwear, wool and heavy 
coats; equip yourself with a fishing rod and 
prepare yourself for something new. 

The waters around Rocky Ford and the 
River Pond Area of Tuttle Creek Reservoir 
have recently been stocked with thousands 
ol rainbow trout. 

Unlike most fish in the area, trout remain 
active throughout the cold winter months. 
So if you can do the same, you may have 
tomorrow night's dinner dangling from the 
end of your pole, which is a lot cheaper than 
if you were to buy the same meal at your 
grocery store. Dillon's is presently asking 
(2.10 for 10 ounces of rainbow trout. 

IF TROUT isn't your idea of a delicacy, 
the crappie and white bass are still therefor 
the catching. Wail for the sun to come out, 
find a brushy area in the lake, and drop your 
line. 

Lately, fishermen have had the best luck 
attracting these gilled creatures using 
either minnows or lead-headed jigs. 



With the dropping temperatures, soon 
another sport will come into play. Ice fishing 
has been very productive for the last two 
years at both Tuttle and Milford Reservoirs. 
If your desire is to see a flopping crappie 
emerge through the ice, be sure your reel is 
full of line. The crappie and bass move to 
deep water (20 feet or more) when the 
ceiling of their home is covered with ice. 

For those of you who have enough sense to 
fear falling through the ice, there are a few 
safety tips. The only state regulation con- 
cerning ice fishing is the prohibition of such 
activity on any running water— streams, 
rivers, etc. It is advisable, however, to be 
sure there is at least three inches of good, 
clear ice before you venture out across the 
frozen lake. 

Drill a hole, drop your bait deep and 
remember: No matter how cold you get 
perched on your icy platform, do not build 
yourself a warming fire. 

Ahearn action 

The K-State women's basketball team will 
host nationally ranked Missouri in Ahearn 
Field House tonight. Tip-off is set for 7 : 30. 

Admission is $1 to K -State students and $2 
to adults. 



Manucci to Green strikes again! 



The outstanding passing combination of 
Dan Manucci to Charlie Green took half the 
honors at K -State's football banquet in the 
Union last night. 

Manucci, a senior from Tempe, Ariz., was 
presented the Ken Ochs Pride Award which 
goes annually to the K -State football player 
who best exemplifies the courage displayed 
by former Wildcat Ken Ochs, who died of 
cancer in 1969. The award is voted upon by 
K-State players. Manucci passed for 1,808 
yards and nine touchdowns this season to 
lead the 'Cats to three Big 8 victories. 

Green, an all-Big 8 selection this season 
and twice the league's leading receiver, was 



selected the team's Most Outstanding 
Player by the coaching staff. The 5-11, 172- 
pound senior from Omaha, Neb., caught 39 
passes tor 616 yards and was a threat as a 
punt and kickoff returner 

Kent McNorton received the Red Raider 
Award which goes to the non-starter who 
contributes the most during the season. 

Freshman ofiensive guard Amos 
Donaldson got the Outstanding Frosh- 
Jay vee Award, also voted by the team. 

John Hafferty, Tom Faerber and Don 
Birdsey received special recognition as K- 
Stale's academic all-Big 8 players. 



Nealy stands out with 'Cats 



(Continued from p. 8) 
opener against Northern Iowa, Nealy has 
been scoring at a 16.8 points-a -game clip. 

Nealy's most impressive outing came on 
the road against Southern Methodist 
University as he contributed 26 points and 
grabbed 12 rebounds in K State's 86-83 
victory. 

"Playing on the road was a lot different 
than playing at Ahearn," Nealy said. "The 
crowd at SMU was a lot noisier than the one 
we faced at Oral Roberts, but I didn't let it 
affect me." 

IN K-STATE'S 72-62 win over Minnesota 
last. week, Nealy really felt the crowd in 
Ahearn for the first time. 



"We played very cautious in the first half 
against Minnesota (athalftime, K-State was 
behind, 33-24). But in the second half we 
scored a few baskets right off and the crowd 
really got going," Nealy said. "During that 
second half, the crowd intimidated Min- 
nesota, which was to our advantage." 

In that second-half explosion against 
Minnesota, Nealy continually got open to 
score easy lay -ins against the Gophers' 
man-to-man defense. 

"Our offense was fit to where I was able to 
get open for the easy basket," Nealy added. 
"I just feel real fortunate that I was thereat 
the right time to help the team out. " 




3&&fo 




MOTHERS 



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EVERY WEDNESDAY (STARTING AT 8:30) FINAL 
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JAN. 6-11. WATCH FOR OUR AP IN TOMORROW* S COUOIftL 

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FREE FILMS 





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Wed. 
RJW DEC. 13 



>>:* 



C»>_«: 



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►%%%! 



News Parade 1942 

Waft Disney's Special 

Christmas Program 

10:30-11:30-12:30 
UNION STATEROOM 



ffljjk-stat e union 



■ ■ • 



i ■ ■ 



i a ■ ■ 



'■■»■•;< 

■ ■ ■ ■ 

■ « ■ i 

'•••V. 

v\v« 



upc feature films 



IMKK '■'«*■■ 






m 



m 




oriental 

dinner 

Bluemont Room 11:30 anr 1 pm 
December 12, 1978 

featuring: Sweet n' Sour Pork 

Chicken Almond with Rice 



Complete Buffet 
S250 

SALAC& Raw PLUS. 

VEGETABLE. MAN gs tlRg. 

BREAD. CGSBTt 

BEVWAGS 



Salad Buffet 

KXRC-OCSCF 
SALADS =ELSH PLATE, 

SV9AGE 



k state union 

bluemont buffet 



0100 



10 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tue, December 12, 1978 




doWtlStOWn by Tim Downs 



v 

SINCE >OUVE BEEN 
HB*E WVE VtfOCHED 
N0TMIN5 BOT SOAP 
OPERAS. 




f lt>UKETO > 

WATCHAWFFEBENT 
SHOW, OKAY? XW 

GOING TO CHANGE 
THE CHANNEL. 




( tLLTURN the > 

wal.okact? ru_ 

JUST FUP THE KNOB 
ANP SWITCH TO 
ANOTHER SHOW. 

ALRIGHT? OKAY? 





PEANUTS 



by Charles ShuKz 



stupid 

BEA6LE 

u — 





I HAVE 

A JOB 

.FOR WU, 





I WANT WU TO TYPE 
THI5-MANU5CRIPTF0(?/Vie, 
ANP IF YOU DON'T PO A 
PERFECT JOB. l% GONNA 
PUNCH W LI6HT5 OUT.' 




THE* NEVER TDLD U5 

ABOUT HER KINP IN 

P/PIN6 CLA55., 



*i 



Crossword By Eugene Sbeffer 



ACROSS 
1 Hindu queen 
S Baseball 

great 
9 Salt, in Paris 

12 Presently 

13 Region 

14 Avail 

15 Idaho resort 

17 Compass 
reading 

18 Vain 

19 Coffee- 
houses 

21 Savor 

24 Besmirch 

25 Chills and 
fever 

21 Stains again 

30 Bakery item 

31 A golfer digs it 

32 Sorrow 

33 Portable 
electric tool 

35 Bristle 

34 French river 

37 Basque 
headgear 

38 Hawaiian 
island 



40 Before long 

42 Sea bird 

43 Pleasant 
aspect 

48 Chemical 
suffix 

49 To corner 
5* Dash 

51 Toper 

52 Prophet 

53 Droops 
DOWN 

1 Eastern title 

2 Babylonian 
god 



3 Start for 
sense or age 

4 Ask 

5 Pay a visit 
I Voided 

escutcheon 

7 Spelling 
or sewing 

8 Surf scoter 

9 Kansas 
bloom 

10 Serf 

11 Dregs 

II American 
humorist 



Average solution time: 24 min. 
iRl 




12-12 
Answer to yesterday's puzzle. 



20 Trouble 

21 Flaps 

22 — Caliente 

23 Protective 
headwear 

24 Clumsy boat 
21 — Stevens 

27 Miss Gabor 

28 Noise of surf 
onshore 

29 Install in 
office 

31 Ceases 

34 Narrow inlet 

35 Taste and 
touch 

37 Young lad 

38 Flower 
garlands 

39 River in 
Italy 

40 Dirk 

41 Strong blow 

44 Yorkshire 
river 

45 Labor org. 
40 Unbranched 

antler 

47 Abstract 

being 




CRYPTOQUIP 12-12 

PJDJOFV PJWDOR PJDWCCV PCXDFB 

YXH WB PYQORPXC BXJHYQ 

Yesterday's Cryptoqoip — RAUCOUS RACE TRACK TOUT 
SOON IRKED THE HANDICAPPER. 

Today'* Cryptoqulp clue : H equals T 



Gasoline alley 

With the cold weather 
already here and winter 
still on its way, a gas can 
speckled with ice could be 
indicative of things to 
come. 

Photo by Scott Stuckey 



Kansas City considered 
for GOP convention 

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP)-The 
Republican committee looking for a site for 
the 1980 GOP national convention inspected 
convention facilities and hotels in Kansas 
City Monday and received a guarantee bi 
more than 13,500 hotel rooms for the con- 
vention, 

"The hotel situation here in 1976, as you 
well know, was just adequate," Ody Fish, a 
member of the site selection committee, 
said of early problems connected with hotel 
space before the last convention two years 
ago. 

"These contracts represent almost the 
same number of rooms as we had in our bloc 
last time. With the additional rooms that are 
to be lined up, this would be something of a 
plus for < Kansas City ) ," Fish said. 



Collegian 
Classifieds 



CLASSIFIED RATES 
One day: 20 word* or loss, $1.50, 5 eantt 
per word ovtr 20; Two days: 20 words or loss, 
$2.00, S cant* par word ovtr 20; Thrae days: 
20 words or last, $2.25, 10 cants par word 
ovtr 20; Four days: 20 words or last, $2.75, 1 3 
ctnlt par word over 20; Five days: 20 words or 
lass, $3.00, 15 cants per word over 20. 

FOR SALE 



MANHATTAN USED Furniture, 
browse 776*1 1 2 (375) 



317 S 4lh Come In and 



WE SELL Marantx and Phillips. Tech Electronic Warehouse, 
across tram Vista Drive Inn on Tultle Creek Blvd. (23tt) 

COINS MAKE excellent gifts. Complete selection US and 
Foreign. Birlhyear and anniversary aels available. Treasure 
Che* I, Old Town Mall— Aggievllfe, W5-7e) 

CHESS SETS, hand carved, wooden and onyx. Also Chess 
tables and backgammon sets Ideal Christmas gills 
Treasure Chest, Agglevllle. (65-78) 

ANTIQUE JEWELRY and watches, nice selection ol Ihe 
classic old styles (or Christmas Old Town Mall and 
Agglevllle. (65-74) 

1975 Chevy Monia 2 plus 2. v «, Automatic, power steering, 
air conditioning, one owner. 539-0345 afternoon and 
evenings. (6973) 

METALLIC BLUE *4oor Chevy Mallbu, 57,000 miles, radio, 
air 8 track, VB, lanlaatlc condition, 1005, negotiable Call 
7760614 today (89-73) 

CANON MF motor drive lor F I Three months ok) with new 
warranty 532-6555. ask lor Craig Chandler (88-73) 

AKC REGISTERED Dachshund puppies ready In time lor 
Christmas Call 776 9B07. evening*. (70-74) 

1969 olds Cullaat, power steering, power brakes, air con- 
dllioning, automatic, good tires, snow tires. 5334131 ask 
(or Vlrgkt or 1 -7(5-3453 (72 78) 

MARTIN D-1B qultar with hardshell case. 1350 or otter 776- 
0048. (7274) 

ONE BIO Brut* 10 ol. magnet, one Jensen Coaxial 20 Ol. 
magnet c*r speakers Best oiler Call 532-3125 (7273) 



(Continued on page 11) 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tim, 



12, If 78 



11 



(Continued from p*a* 10) 

1974 DATSUN 2602 44,000 miles. New l/res Gold with black 
Inlerlor, 14, 100. 5324142. Jtm. (72-78) 

1973 POLARE custom, power steering, power brakes, tilt, 
cruiee, AM FM 8 (rack. Alto, pioneer SX 780 40-wetl 776- 
7325.(72-78) 

SEND SOMEONE ■ Collegian subscription lor Chrlslmaa. 
Com* to Kedile 103. (72-78) 

LEAVING, MUST sell 1970 Ford station wagon. *27S Call 
776-7508 alter 4:30 p.m. (73-76) 

NEW CALCULATOR, APF Mark-56. similar to HP-32E. toga, 
trig, hyperbolic s, vector addition, at and if d deviation 
PoJirec, rad/deg, MetrlcAJ.S. customary conversions RPN 
logic 145. 7764525 atter 5:00 p.m. (73-74) 

8- TRACK player, recorder, e« eel lent for recording tapes for 
your car. Pax Pax ITS Call 776-1802. (73-79) 

SPEAKERS SRL 100s. must sell. Three way 12" woofers, 
great Christmas buy Must hear lo believe Cad 776-1802 al- 
ter 5:00 p.m (73-75) 



GIANT TECH 

STEREO GARAGE 

SALE 

NEW (not old stock) 
MERCHANDISE 



PHILLIPS 

Receivers 



Warehouse 



7861 45w/Ch 
7851 30w/Ch 
H784 18w/Ch 



Reg. 

$360 
$280 

$209.95 



Price 

$249.95 
$209.95 
$169.95 

$89.95 
$119.95 



Turntables 
GA437Blt.Drv. $119.95 
AFT777 Bit. Drv. $180 

Speakers 
AH477 3 Way $299.95 40% off 
AH475 2 Way $139.95 40% off 
The following Marantz models will 
be sale priced. No prices shown 
here as Marantz does not approve 
of advertisement of prices this low 
on their current top merchandise. 

MARANTZ 



Receivers 


Separates 


1515 


1090 


1530 


3250 


1550 


170DC 


2216 


2100 


2226 


2020 


2238 


1152DC 


2265 




2600 




Cassette Decks 


Speakers 


5000 


900 


5025 


700's 




550's 




7 Mark II 



Mastercharge & BankAmericard 
not accepted at these prices as 
these are cash prices only. 
—Quantities limited to stock on 

hand. 
—Entrance to garage will be 

through the main door. 



TECH ELECTRONICS 
WAREHOUSE 

Across from Vista 

Drive-Inn on Tuttle Creek 

Boulevard. 



MUST SELL I Nice l wo bedroom mobile home Partially lur 
nlahad, carpeted, washer, dryer, air conditioner 537-1558. 
weekends t -455-3401, ask tor Kaf hy (73- 78) 

14x70 WINDSOR 1970. two bedroom, central air, payments 
S170, lot rant S48 Located Tuttle Creek Trailer CI. 537- 
9132.(7376) 



FOR RENT 

TYPEWRITER RENTALS, electric* and manuals, day, week 
or month Buuelli. 511 Leavenworth, across from post of- 
fice. Call 776-0460.(1 tt| 

RENTAL TYPEWRITERS: Excellent selection. Hull Business 
Machines, 1212 Mora. 539-7931 Service most makes ol 
typewriter*. Also Victor and Olivetti adders. (1611) 

SANTA SUITS. Reserve yours now. Treasure Chest. 
Agglevlll*. (43-76) 

LARGE ONE bedroom furnished apartment si 221 N Juliette 
Wster trash, and heat oak), It 60 par month. 776-3896 or 1- 
456-9814.(84-76) 

TWO BEDROOM basement apart manl, furnished. 
Washerrdrysr hook up f 160 plus KPL. at 1822 Hunting, one 
halt block from KSU 5396401. (66*)) 

LARGE FURNISHED apartment al 1018 Osage, bedrooms 
and sleeping lofts, good for 3-4 people 1250, bills paid. 
537-4233 (66-95) 

FURNISHED BEDROOMS, kitchen and laundry (acuities, 
tree perking and walk to KSU. J55 and up, bills paid 537- 
4233. (66-95) 

NEAR CAMPUS, 2 or 3 mates, private rooms, nice brick 
home. 5374283 or 539-2663 (68-76) 



NICE ONE bedroom apartment, good location 1100. 839- 
7124, 5396966. (09-73) 

ONE BEDROOM apartment, one block west ol campus. 
Available January 1*1. 1130 a month. 776-1066 or 537-1522 
(69-76) 

LARGE FURNISHED two bedroom, one and On* hall bath, 
balcony, laundry facilities, water and Irash paid, Mora. 
available January tst. 776-7746 (70-76) 

LARGE THREE bedroom house, 1 104 Bluemont. Available 
January 1st. One and one half bathrooms. Irish, water 
paid. 776-6300 or 539-8401 {70-73) 

FOUR BEDROOM house, on* block from campus. Fireplace, 
large living area Available Dec. 15. Phone 537-4648.(70-74) 

ONE BEDROOM and targe two bedroom apartments near 
campus Available January 1st 537-2344. (70-78) 



Villa Apartments 
526 N. 14th 

Available January 
2 Blocks from campus 

ONE-BEDROOM 
FURNISHED 
$200 A MONTH 

—No pets or children- 
Call 
537%ei or 539-1201 



BARGAIN TWO bedroom apartment al Wildcat Creek for 
$210 a month. SuMaaae wW run from January 1 to May 30. 
Witling to negotiate over term*. Cmlf 7769568 between fl-00 
p.m. and midnight for more Information. (70-74) 

ONE BEDROOM apartment available al 814 Leavenworth 
Call 537-2002 or 539-3872 (7 1 75) 

ONE OR TWO bedroom basement, furnished, on* block from 
campus. All utilities paid. One bedroom, 1 160 monthly. 
Two bedroom, 1200. Available now and lea** until August 
1st. or tor one year. Very dean. 7764010, 740 a.m 5:30 
p.m., Monday through ThursdSly. (72-781 



WILDCAT INN 

2nd Semester 

Seniors Graduating 

Make Limited Availability 

For 2nd Semester 

Occupancy 

Call 

CELESTE 

for Information 

539-5001 



SECOND SEMESTER, studio, basement, furnished apart- 
ment ST 10. all utilities paid Private entrance. 1322 Pierre 
Call 5394746. (72-76) 

UNFURNISHED TWO bedroom apartment Close lo campus. 
Gas and water paid. J 180 month. 539-3938 (72-75) 

LEAVENWORTH AND North 4th. One and one half room 
basement efficiency, nicely furnished. Everything private. 
$1 15. plus electricity No pels. 539*904 (73-78) 



NOW RENTING 

WILDCAT CREEK 

APARTMENTS 

1&2BR 

furnished & unfurnished 

from $165 
FREE shuttle service to 
KSU 

portion of utilities paid 
adjacent to Westloop 
Shopping Center 

PHONE 



• 



539-2951 

or see at 
1413 Cambridge Place 



ONE BEDROOM unfurnished apartment Aero** tha street 
from campus. Open January 1st f 100 month, 539-4208 (73- 
76) 

ONE BEDROOM apart men! -close lo campus— 1160 per 
month. Call 537-8064. Take over l***e Dec. 15th. (73-761 

MUST SEE this large one bedroom furnished duplex. 
Redecorated, country selling, close lo town. 1186. No 
pel*. 7764846 (73-78) 



SUBLEASE 



TWO BEDROOM trailer, furnished Available January 1st. 
5150. Call 539-3149. (71-75) 

SHARE LARGE house two block* Irom campus and 
Aggleviiie Available January tat. ISO. at 1008 Valuer, 537 
40 15 attar 7:00 p.m . (72-76) 

WHERE WILL you live next semester? Next year? My lease 
ends In May I have a two bedroom trailer. I walk lo work 
but there Is off -a treat parking lor three or four cars Rent Is 
negotiable Leave message al 532-5596 or write Jim 
Droege al Lot 11 420 Summit. (72-73) 

APARTMENT WITH living room, one bedroom, Kitchen, bath. 
Good location No pels Parking space valor*. Call 537 
8964 alter 5:00 p m (72-74) 



SECOND SEMESTER, furnished one-bedroom apartment 
Close to campus. Available January ttt. 1150, plus 
utilities. Call 7764941 evening* alter 7:00 p.m (72-76) 

ONE BEDROOM furnished apartment, hall block Irom cam- 
pus. Olf street parking. Available January 1. Call 778-0257 
after 5:00 p.m. (73-76) 

SECOND SEMESTER, large, partly furnished two bedroom 
house. One half block from campus and Aggleviiie. 
Available January 1st. f 165 Rick or Wad*. 77M »06 (73-76) 



ROOMMATE WANTED 

FEMALES TO sham exceptional house at KSU. furnished, 
private bedrooms. 165 and up, washer *nd dryer, no pet*, 
•I 809N. 11th. 9394401. (5748) 

MALE TO share large house one block from KSU. Private 
bedroom, furnished. 170 at 1 108 Bluemont. 5396401. (66- 
98) 

NEEDED: TWO roommate* for next semester Pet* allowed. 
Cheap and c lose to campus. Call 776-3570. (67-76) 

FEMALES TO share large furnished apartment. Walk to cam- 
pus t75 month Utilities paid. 539-2663 (67-78) 

COZY I COM FY I Private furnished room In 3 story 
house— two baths, kitchen, washer ft dryer, disposal, 
microwave oven, cleaning woman. Male or female 21 year* 
or older. Can move In now— rant atarte January 1. 1100 
plus utilities. Samara 7764808 (89-76) 

SHARE TWO bedroom apsrtmenl In qutel, wooded anas. 

Flreptac* Your n*H-*150. utilities Included. 776-7296 and 
776-7581.(69-73) 

MALE TO share one bedroom lumlshed apartment for 
second aamsatar. laundry fee miles, swimming poof, air 
conditioning, transportation to campus. *9*month plus 
1/2 utilities 539- 5932. heap trying (69-73) 

ONE OR two to share two bedroom apartment at WHdcat 
Creek with two male* for spring semester 7764643 (69-73) 

MALE ROOMMATE for spring semester. Own bedroom. Car- 

paling end dishwasher. Two block* lo campus Call Steve, 
7764163. (70-74) 

ONE OR two roommate* (or second s e m e s ter- Large four 
bedroom hout* with laundry. Modaral* habit* required 
160 per month 539-7366. (70-74) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to *h*r* large two bedroom 

apartment. Furnished, fully carpeted and draped Laundry 
facilities, dishwasher, fireplace, private parking, pool and 
much mor*. Call 539-3604. (70-74) 

KANSAS CITY. Female to share vary nlc* two bedroom, 
almost completely furnished apartment In 
"Mission"— Kansas City. KS. Convenient location right Ofl 
I 35, close lo Plaza, and Westport. 1150 a month, plus half 
of utilities Great opportunity for parson going on block or 
gradual Ing In December. Call (91 3) 362-4968 (70-76) 

FEMALE TO share Ihree bedroom house, washer, dryer. Call 
alter 6:00 p.m . 537-4447 or daytime 539-7568 Ask lor Jaan- 
ny. (70-74) 

JANUARY FIRST, female to share two bedroom furnished 
apartment two blocks Irom KSU. 687 month plus elec- 
tricity. Call 537-4292. (70-74) 

LIBERAL FEMALE; prater upperclaas person. Share two 
bedroom house, one hall block from West Stadium. (60 
plus one third utilities Call 537-2945. (71-75) 

NON-SMOKING female to share one bedroom nicely fur- 
nished apartment sterling 1st ol January 182.50 month 
plus one half utilities. Call 778-3502 attar 5:00 pit. Work 
7764691.(71-75) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester 10 share two bedroom fur- 
nished trailer. 175 a month plus one halt militias 539-3149 
(72-76) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE to share very nice Iwo bedroom apart- 
ment close to campus stsrtlng January. 1100 month. 776- 
0928alfer 5:00p.m. (72-74) 

MALE NEEDED lor next semester, furnished apartment one 
block from campus WO, plus very low utilities 1729 
Lamml*. 5374474. (72-76) 

MALE TO share very nice one bedroom apartment lor second 
semester, one and half blocks from campus S87.50 plus 
one halt utilities. 537-9461 . (72-76) 

NEEDED: FEMALE for spring semester to share furnished 
full basement apartment with Iwo upparctass woman 
Private bedroom Utilities Included $75 month Call 776- 
3899. (72-76) 

FEMALE ROOMMATE lo share luxury apartment. Air con 
dllloned, dishwasher, pool, west side 1125, share ex- 
penses. Call alter 6:00 p.m. 776-5060. (72-781 

TWO CHRISTIAN females to share Iwo bedroom apartment 
lor spring semester. Call Connie alter 5:00 p.m. 7769873 
(73-75) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester to share two bedroom In Dar 
Jo Complex. Will have own room SU6 month plus one third 
utilities Call 776-1342.(73-76) 

MALE TO share two bedroom mobile home, washer, dryer, 
air conditioned, cable. S60 month, one halt utilities. Can 
Don, 5324620, 7764920 (73-76) 

FEMALE FOR spring semester Private bedroom, laundry. 
Four blocks irom campus. % 75 per month plus one fourth 
utilities Call 776-3844. (72-78) 



HELP WANTED 



OVERSEAS JOBS— Summer/full time. Europe, S. America, 
Australia, Asia. etc. AH fields, 6500-1200 monthly, ex- 
penses paid, sightseeing Free Info. Write: Internal Ion a I 
Job Center , Box 4490-KB, Berkeley, CA 94704(60-79) 

BUROER KING wants Individual lo work two nights during 
the weak, 7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. One weekend night 
required 700 p.m. to 3:00 a.m. Start S2.85 per hour. (3 after 
on* month. Conlacl Mr. Wagner or Mr. Nation in person. 
(66-76) 

BARTENDERS AND floor walkers to work part-lime. Musi 
work weekends. Apply In person. 1216 Laramie 11 00 a.m. 
12 noon and 1:00 p.m. dally, or phone 5394525 for ap- 
pointment (7074) 

AGGIE SOUND Enterprises need* a DJ with (he talent lo en- 
tertain the older generation (30 1 001 with music of their 
peal lo the present. Earnings negotiable depending on ex- 
perience and willingness to sdverttse. Work available over 
break. 7784279- (71-73) 

MEN/WOMEN, part-time, earn |4 88 plus par hour. Earn good 
pre-Chrlatmss money. Must be mature and alert. National 
Co. 776-7325 (72 76| 

ROOM AND board and S100 a month for sludent willing to 
live In and cook, supper only, and do light housekeeping lor 
retired faculty member. House near campus. Call 632 5590 or 
atop at 1 18 Seston Hall. (73-76) 



SERVICES 

RESUMES WRITTEN from scutch (18 and up Also general 
typing, writing, editing. Fas) Action Resumes. 415 N. 3rd. 
537-7294. (66-76) 

STEREO REPAIR, Over 500 replacement styles In slock. The 
Circuit Shop, 776-1221. 1204 Moro SI. (8-76) 

THE OFFSET Press prints anything: resumes, brochures, let- 
terheads, posters, pamphlets, newspapers Lei us do your 
next |ob. 317 Houston. 7764689. (22 tf) 

ENGAGEMENT RINGS, wedding sets. Custom designing In 
gold and silver. Jewelry repair Including antique jewelry 
Custom Jewelers, 539-3225 411 N. Third. (55-74) 

WILL DO typing (term papers, resumes, etc) Any type ol 
material. Am experienced Call 7784068 (70-74) 



, SOUPENE 
COMPUTER 

WHEEL 

ALIGNMENT 

114 South 5th Phone 776-8054 



CHRISTMAS PORTRAITS. Pastel, charcoal and pencil 
liken***. Guaranteed. Price* Irom (5 to 115. Llv* or from 
photo Call 776-3664. (60-76) 



ATTENTION 

FOR 65.50 par hour, for each parson In group* ol three, will 
give local flight wound Manhattan and surrounding area or 
croa* country flights Cruise 1 30 or 140 mph Call Bob, 776 
7424. (For Ihe faster aircraft, cost wHl be 61.S0 mora par 
hour per person )(71 74) 

SEND A Collegian subscription to soma one for Christmas 
Coma Into Kedxle 103. W* an* open during the noon hour 
too. (72-76) 

FINAL PRICE reduction 60-79% off man's and ladles 
chokers S347. 90% off eelected 14 carat gold wadding 
band*. 90% OH mens lurquoii* and tlgwr eya rings. 90% 
off selected large starling silver b ra ce lets 40% off all 
earrings Price* will not go lower. Wlndftre Jewelry, 230 N. 
3rd. (73-79) 



NOTICES 

MANHATTAN PAWN Shop, 317 S. 4th Street, 7Tf> 
8112— Stereos, 6-trsck*. TVs, typewriters, guitars, 
camera*. Buy -Ml I -trad*. (3- TB) 

SHIPPING OVERSEAS attar graduVt Call Overs*** Ship- 
ping Consultant* lor rales and tree estimate 7764213, 
Box 699. Manhattan 6)676) 



DISCO FANTsASY 

Sponsored by 

Aggie Sound Enterprises 

1606 Fairchild, Manhattan 
776-9279 or 532-3439 

Now taking bookings for the 
Spring semester. Prices any- 
where from $50 to $250, depending 
on location and equipment you 
desire. 

Call for an appointment to see and hear 
the disco show in operation. 

Steve Pfannenstiel, D.J. 
Jeffrey K. Johnston, owner 



ARCHITECTURE AND design students shop her* »nd save, 
woodland scenic* ft 27 Best prices on balsa wood. We've 
got what you want. Tom's Hobby and Crafts. 716 N 
Manhattan. In Aggleviiie (72 76) 

CANT THINK of a gill for some one? Send a Collegian sub- 
scription, come into Kedzle 103 and we will lake care ol It. 
(72-76) 



WANTED 

RIDER WANTED, leaving for SEUS IFIorlda) Wednesday 
Ihe 20th, to share expenses. Call 532-4668, ask tor Lannle. 
(73-76) 

nonsmoking lemale roommate lot spring semester lo 
share apartment al Wildcat 7 with Iwo other girls Call 776- 
1925 (72-76) 

RIDERS TO Edmburg. Tanas by way, ol Dallas, Austin. San 
Antonio Leaving December 28 and reluming January 12. 
Share expenses and driving Call Larry 776-4920. (72-74) 

RIDER FROM Delroit. Ml Return to Manhattan Dec 29th or 
30th. Share gas and driving (4-speed slick) Call Bob. 937 
8374 or 5324170, leave message After Dec. 21. 1-313451 
3815 (73-76) 



LOST 

MAN'S SEIKO watch with stop watch. In locker room In gym. 
Call 776-7239. (71-75) 

SET OF keys, on Denlson Ave. between Fairchild and An- 
derson Avenues. Leather disc lob reads Tortilla Flats. Call 
5374293 alter 3:30 or before 1 0:00 a.m. (71-74) 

REWARD-WOMAN'S class ring lost Friday In Mr. K'* or 

Hlbachl Hut. If found, call Katie at 539-7571. (73-74) 



FOUND 

BLACK GLOVES near clock by Denlson Hall To claim call 
537-7161 (71-73) 

CALCULATOR. CALL Hall 139 lo Claim and Identify, (73-79) 



PERSONAL 

BILL P. Congrats 2 tha new pre* ol FH. Remember Phil 4:13. 
HERM, (73) 

JOE— HAPPY B-day "Don 'I droop In your daylight 
darkness " I'll be thinking ol you on the 12th. See you at 
Christmas Love, and a lonely Jayhawk (mis* ya). Claud. 
(73-74) 

BUS M— KSU Marching Band. Party at Mother's Worry 
tonight after the game. Let's help the Wild Kittens win and 
(hen celebrate Look out London, her* w* cornel (73) 

BERNIE AND Pete: From the Eagles to keeping up with the 
Jone's. to u* the nlghl was Ilk* a shooting star— ended too 
soon. How about another bottle of Welch's grape |ufce? 
We had an excellent time. Thanks room 426. (731 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY Booster Budy. Don't gat S-taesd on my 
account, you owe II to yourself 1 Hav* a great 120. (73) 

MERRY BIRTHDAY Mr. Bill. Have a great day I Love. Andy 
Glbb and the Baa Gee'*. (73) 

SANDY K. *ftd Scott B.: Congrals on your engagement! Ha I* 
definitely one lucky TKE1 We wondered why he was 
hanging around our apartment so much. (73) 

RAY MARTIN: l can see you still haven't grown up a oil. How 
Old will you be In January- 167 Carta. (73) 

TIM. HAPPY birthday. May your nineteenth year bring as 
many happy memories as your eight tenth did. Love. Bath 
173) 



12 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Tue.. Dw«mb*r 12. 1978 



Is he or isn't he? 
Teddy's ambition 
remains unknown 

WASHINGTON (APi-Sen. Edward 
Kennedy, who insists he's not running for 
president, has hired a young political expert 
in yet another move bound to heighten 
speculation about his 1980 presidential in- 
tentions. Is he running or isn't he? 

Even his wife says she doesn't know for 
sure. 

"1 have no idea, but every time I pick up a 
newspaper he's on page one,'" Joan Kennedy 
said Monday. "1 talk to him ail the time, but 
not about that." 

Even though Kennedy keeps denying he's 
a presidential candidate, he does things 
candidatesare expected to do. 

By hiring the political expert, Carl 
Wagner, Kennedy is getting a man well- 
known among party liberals as an 
organizer. Wagner's friends say he also was 
sought by the Carter White House. 

Tom Southwick, Kennedy's press 
secretary, said Wagner, 33, will join the 
senator's staff next week "to keep track of 
governors and other out-of-state officials, as 
well as help the senator with his speaking 
schedule." 

Kennedy hasn't had such an aide since 
before the 1976 presidential elections. "It 
was a matter of finding the right person," 
Southwick said. 

IF HE'S NOT running for president, why 
does the Massachusetts Democrat need a 
$40,<XK»-a-year political expert to help him 
keep in touch with out-of-state politicans? 

"Because," Southwick said, "there are 
many things we're involved with 
legislatively, like welfare and national 
health insurance, that involve these 
people." 

Southwick said hiring Wagner has nothing 
to do with any presidential campaign. 

Wagner also discounted speculation that 
he will help Kennedy run for president in the 
next election. 

"I have no expectation that I'll be doing 
anything regarding 1980," he said. "I'm 
really serious." 

WHILE HE has insisted in recent months 
that he is not running for president, Ken- 
nedy also has: 

—Publicly split with President Carter 
over national health insurance. 

—Addressed a Democratic state con- 
vention in New Hampshire, home of the 
nation's earliest presidential primary. 

—Campaigned for other Democratic 
candidates in at least 16 states which, 
perhaps coincident ly, included states with 
enough delegates to give any candidate the 
presidential nomination in 1980. 

—Given a shouting, pounding speech at 
the Democrat's midterm convention in 
Memphis last weekend to support his pet 
project, national health insurance. One 
reporter wrote: "In contrast to Kennedy, 
Carter's Friday night tepid opening speech 
was a belter cure for insomnia than 
Sorninex." 




ALL ABOARD FOR 

T & T TUESJ 

(Taco tt Tequila Tues. ! > 




■"«* 



• TACOS AND 
SANCHOS 

Served 5 p.m.-tl: 30 p.m. 

• 2F0R1 

(in all tequila 
drink set-ups 

• 25' SET-UPS 
SUNRISES 

today only . , . 

DRINK SPECIALS GOOD 

4:00p.m. -CLOSING! 



Book Buy-Sack 



Here 
are some 
answers to 
often asked questions 




Question: 
Answer: 



How does the Union Bookstore determine how much your 
books are worth when you sell them back? 

If the Bookstore has notification from the instructor that the 
books are to be re-adopted for use the next semester, and If the 
Bookstore does not already have a sufficient stock on hand, then 
you will be offered 60 per cent of the publisher's current list price. 

For example: if a book sells lor $10.00 new and it meets the 
requirements noted above, the book would be bought from you for 
$6.00. 

If the Bookstore has not received notice that the book will be 
used again, or if it already has a sufficient stock on hand, the book 
would be worth the current wholesale price as indicated by one of 
the nation's largest jobbers of used textbooks. 

If you have any questions about the price being paid for a text- 
book, the buyer will be happy to answer any questions which you 
may have regarding the price paid. 



Question: 
Answer: 



Is 60 par cent the usual price paid 
for textbooks around the country? 

Definitely not. Most stores in the United States pay only 50 per 
cent for books being used again. The Union Bookstore is one of the 
few stores which pays 60 per cent. And remember, we pay cash. You 
don't have to take your money out in trade. 



Question: 
Answer: 



What about paperbacks? Does the 
60 per cent policy apply to them too? 

Yes. The Union Bookstore does not penalize you on paper- 
backs, if they are being used again, and if the bookstore needs 
them, you will receive 60 per cent of the publisher's list price. 



Question: 
Answer*. 



We will buy books: 




If the publisher's price has gone up since I bought my books, 
will I receive the benefit of that price increase? 

Yes. For instance, if you bought your book for $9.00 and the 
publisher's list price is now $10.00, you will get $6.00, not $5.40. 



Monday, Dec. 11 


8:15 a.m. 


thru 


Id 


Friday, Dec. 15 


4:45 p.m. 



Saturday, Dec. 16 
Monday, Dec. 18 

thru 

Friday, Dec. 22 

kstate union 

bookstore 



10:00 a.m. 

to 

4:00 p.m. 

8:15 a.m. 
to 

4:45 p.m. 



0301 






I * 

1, .i.n. .'. J w * '• ' 

TOPrKA, KS 



LV.CH 



Kansas 
State 



Collegian 



Wednesday 

December 13, 1978 
Kansas State University 
Manhattan, Kansas 
Vol.85, No. 74 



nside 



, GOOD MORNING, the Titan ics were 
unsinkable after all— at least In water 
polo. Story and pictures, page 10... 

THE RILEY County Historical 
Society has something for almost 
everyone. Details, page 12... 



K-State to lose $14.2 million? 



Budget division may ax '80 funds 



K-State's proposed 1980 budget could be 
slashed by as much as $14.2 million, ac- 
cording to recommendations released by the 
state budget division. 

The Kansas Boa rd of Regents concluded 
Tuesday the first of two days of budget 
hearings during which the agency is 
defending its request for slate university 
funding of $474 million for fiscal 1980, a 
request the state budget division wants cut 
by more than $50 million. 

The state budget division recommended 
$99 i million for K-State in fiscal 1980, 
although (he Board of Regents had 
requested $1 13.3 million. Regents estimated 
the University would require $106,2 million 
for fiscal 1979 spending. 

A group of K-State administrators will 
petition Governor elect John Car fin today in 
Topeka to restore money to the University's 
1980 proposed budget. 

If the group is successful, Carlin would 
restore the cuts in his recommendations to 
the 1979 legislature in early January, ac- 
cording to Dan Bealty, K-State vice 
president of business affairs. The group is 
seeking restoration of more than $17 million 
to the budget. 

ALMOST HALF the cuts came under 
capital improvement for the fiscal year. The 
group will seek restoration of more than $4 
million for construction of a coal fired 
power plant and almost $2 million for 
construction of central chilling equipment 
and cooling lowers and modification of the 
existing cooling system. 

The group also will try to get almost 
$200,0011 restored to the budget of the College 
of Veterinary Medicine. 

The stale budget division recommended a 
$4 million 1980 budget for the veterinary 



center, although the Board of Regents had 
requested $4.2 million. Veterinary medicine 
officials estimated fiscal 1979 expenditures 
at $5.1 million 

Representatives of the Board of Regents 
took the offensive Tuesday declaring that 
budget cuts recommended by the division 
were of a magnitude not seen "since the 
Great Depression ." 

The regents" request represents an in- 
crease in funding of $43 million more for 
fiscal 1980 than the estimated spending of 
state universities in fiscal 1979. 

James Bibb, state budget director, is 
recommending to Carlin that the regents 



receive only $422.6 million next fiscal 
year— a reduction of $52.2 million from the 
requested appropriation. 

FRANK LOWMAN, regents chairman, led 
the assault against those recommended cuts 
during budget hearings before Bibb and 
Carlin. The regents are scheduled to return 
to the hearings today. 

"I must say, however, that the cuts made 
this year appear to be of a magnitude not 
seen in regents' budgets since the Great 
Depression," Lowmansaid. 

"The overall increases which have been 
recommended by the budget division would 



Ten years after fire, 
Nichols' fate pending 



On Friday, Dec. 13, 1968. Nichols Gym- 
nasium was gutted by fire— 10 years later, 
OH Dec. 13, 1978, the burned-out hulk 
remains as a monument to student activists 
of the '60s. 

The lire started about 11 p.m., shortly 
alter a K -Stale basketball win in Ahearn 
Field House. At the time. Nichols was 57 
years old. 

Destroyed in the lire were manuscripts 
and instruments belonging to the music 
department, and broadcasting equipment of 
the campus radio station, KSDB. 

Both the music department and KSDB are 
housed today in the classroom area of 
McCain Auditorium. 

Little has been done to the lire-ravaged 



walls of the "Castle" since the swimming 
pools in the basement were closed several 
years ago. 

Attempts by students to restore the 
stucture have met mainly with indifference. 

State Sen Koss Doyen ( R-Concordia ) , a 
K-State alumnus and longtime supporter of 
the University, took the project under his 
wing and was able to gain some support for 
the restoration in the stale legislature. 

During last spring's session, $45,000 was 
appropriated for a feasability study to see 
what could be done with the structure. So 
far, no one has been hired to undertake such 
a study. 

Doyen estimates the renovation of the 
structure could take $4 to $5 million. 



be barely one-half the current rate of in- 
flation," he said. 

The regents are trying to sell the gover- 
nor-elect and, eventually, the full 
Legislature on a new method of figuring how 
much each state university should be ap- 
propriated. 

A special funding task force organized by 
the regents studied each of the universities 
under its control and compared their fun- 
ding with selected out-of-state universities 
thought to have similar characteristics 

For example, K-State and the University 
of Kansas were compared with universities 
in Oklahoma, Iowa, Oregon, Colorado and 
North Carolina. 

If the regents institution was found to have 
a funding level below its "peer" group, then 
the regents recommended additional money 
lor next year. 

'As the detailed study of the 19 com- 
parison institutions came to a conclusion, it 
became apparent that the Kansas regents 
universities were being funded at a level 
considerably below the average rates in the 
comparison schools," Lowman said 

The regents chairman added that to bring 
the universities up to their comparison 
groups, an immediate injection of $15 
million would be required. 

lnst*-ail, the regents are asking that 50 
percent of the difference be made up in 
fiscal 1980, wiih the remainder evenly added 
during the next two fiscal years. 

The regents are requesting faculty salary 
increases of 6. 5 percent, which Lowmansaid 
was far below the federally-estimated an- 
nua! rise of 9 7 percent predicted for the 
consumer price index. 

The regents also want an increase of 9.5 
percent for student help wages. 



All aboard: Clagett express 
chugs on after 24 years 



By KAREN CARLSON 
Collegian Reporter 

Flaying with train sets may be for 
children, but for Don Clagett it's a hobby 
he'll never outgrow. 

Clagett, 1223 Pierre, said he started on 
his elaborate train set nearly 24 years 
ago and hasn't stopped yet. 

He has put a lot of time and effort into 
his railroad, located in the basement of 
his souths ide home. 

"1 get my fun out of it. I don't drink, 1 
don't smoke and 1 don't chase women, so 
this is it, "he said. 

Clagett 's railroad is the Circling Eagle 
Division of the Missouri Pacific Line, 
with Don Clagett as president and 
engineer. 

He said he's not sure how much money 
he has invested over the years, but 
values one of the cars at $700. 

Clagett takes pictures of actual train 
cars and studies them to make scaled 
duplicates for his train set. He said he 
does very detailed work. Not only does he 
keep the engines running, but he paints 
all his cars from photographs he has 
taken. 

"It takes anywhere from 12 to 15 hours 
to paint one of the cars," he said. 

CLAGETT has constructed a replica of 
a town replete with miniature people, 
dogs, cars, trucks and shrubery to make 
the railroad-side scene realistic. 

Among the features along the track 
circuit are a bridge, a tunnel, a lake, a 
Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant, 
bums i "You've got to have bums around 
the railroad station") and a naked 
woman. 

"She's had lots ol use Right now she's 
been skmnv dipping and her dip has been 



interrupted, so she's hiding in the 
hushes," he said. 

"The shrubbery is mainly dishwasher 
sponges dyed with food coloring," he 
said. "I pick up train models and scenery 
anywhere I can grab it." 

Clagett said he was disappointed 
because his Kentucky Fried Chicken kit 
didn't include a cane for Col. Sanders. He 
said he thought for a long time for 
something to use and almost gave up 
until one day when he was playing with 
his dog. 

"We were wresllin' around and one of 
(see CLAGETT, p. 6) 




Pnoloiby Dane Ksup 

ENGINEER. ..Don Clagett, 

president and engineer tor his 
miniature railroad, works the 
controls for his Circling Eagle 
Division of the Missouri Pacific 
Lines. 




KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wed, December 13, 1978 



tr**~ 




• #• 



progress' with Sadat 
leads Vance to 'new ideas' 



CAIRO, Egypt <AP>— The United States 
and Egypt decided today on a new formula 
to present to Israel aimed at overcoming 
two key obstacles to a Middle East peace 
treaty. 

The Washington peace talks have been 
stalled over linking the treaty to steps 
toward Palestinian autonomy on the West 
Bank of the Jordan River and the Gaza 
Strip. The second issue is a provision in the 
treaty that restrains Egypt from joining 
other Arab countries, should they go to war 
with Israel. 

"We have finished with these two issues," 
U.S. Secretary of State Cyrus Vance told 
reporters as he climbed in his black 
limousine outside Egyptian President 
Anwar Sadat's villa. "I would say it was a 
positive and helpful set of meetings which 
we've had and now we're going to meet with 
the Israelis starting tomorrow morning. 

"We've made good progress," Vance said. 

Egyptian sources indicated that ac- 
ceptance of the new formula by Israel was 
highly problematic "This will prolong the 
negotiations," said one highly placed 
Egyptian official, who refused to be named. 

The formula, described by the source only 
as "new ideas," was worked out at a 70- 
minute meeting between Vance and Sadat. 

Vance is flying to Israel Wednesday to try 
to sell the package to Prime Minister 
Menachem Begin. 

In a brief exchange with reporters outside 
his Nile residence, Sadat said Vance then 



Campus 
Bulletin 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

KSU POTTER'S GUILD will have a Christmas saleS am 
Spm Thursday and Friday in the Union Courtyard 

APPLICATIONS are being fallen Ihougn Friday tor the 
coordinated undergraduate program in dietetics, see 
Professor Roach In Justin 10? 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL has scheduled the linal oral 
defense of the doctoral dissertation of Tiruvoor Nagarala 
tor lo a m Thursday in Call 140. 

THE graduate SCHOOL has scheduled the linal oral 
defense ol the doctoral dissertation of Barry Primm for 
10 30 a.m. Friday in Waters 341 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL has scheduled the linal oral 
delense ol the doctoral dissertation ol Jacob Stonim for 

3 JOp.m Friday In union M4, 

TODAY 

SOCIAL WORK CLUB officers Will meet in Waters 279 si 
J: 30 p.m. 

LAFENE STUDENT HEALTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

will meet in Lalene Conference Room at 4 JO p.m. 

TOUCHSTONE will meet n Union 103 at > p.m. 

THURSDAY 

COLLEGIATE 4M will meet In Moore 11? at »;30 p.m. 

SOCIAL WORK CLUB will sponsor a family abuse and 
mcesl workshop in Union II 1 1 J p.m. 

NORTHERN FLINT HILLS AUDUBON will meet in 
Achert 211 al7;Wp m ; the public Is welcome 

NONDENOMINATIONAL COMMUNION SERVICE will 
be in Danlorth Chapel at 4 10 p m 

BUMPATHON DANCERS will meet at Molher's Worry at 

4 30 p.m. 

FRIDAY 

INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP will meet 
at the F irsl Lutheran Church at r p.m. 



WHITE STAG 

ACTION SPORTS 

Men's & Women's 

SKI JACKETS 
f Vi Price ) 




would return to Egypt, but he did not specify 
a date. 

Vance held a news conference in Cairo 
Monday, flew lo Irael today for the funeral 
of former Prime Minister Golda Meir, then 
flew back to Cairo for more talks with Sadat. 







GIVE 
AGGIE STATION 
MEMBERSHIPS 

FOR 
CHRISTMAS) 

Call 539-9936 after 4 p.m. 



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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wtd., 0«c«mb«r 13, 1978 



Briefly 



Mite-high city enters supersonic age 

DENVER— Braniff International's supersonic transport airliner, 
the Concorde, inaugurated the supersonic age for Denver Tuesday 
morning. 

The Concorde arrived at Stapleton International Airport, slightly 
behind schedule. Airline and airport employees sat on forklifts and 
other equipment to view the airplane. 

The Concorde, promoting Braniff's upcoming flights between 
Dallas-Fort Worth and Europe, was scheduled for a two-hour stop in 
Denver. 



Indian massacre site yields new find 

GREAT REND— A skeleton found on the bank of Walnut Creek in 
Barton County is believed to be that of a victim of an Indian 
massacre in the 1860s, and no recent crime is suspected, Sheriff 
Gene Marks said Tuesday. 

Two boys skating on the creek Sunday reported the skull sticking 
out of the creek bank. The location is about two miles east of Great 
Bend near the site of an old frontier fort, Fort Zarah. 

The scattered remains of eight to 10 bodies attributed to the 
massacre were found in the same area in April 1973. 

Marks said the state historical society was taking possession of 
the latest find. 



No roof for his (her) head 

KANSAS CITY, Kan.— Where is King Solomon when we really 
need him? 

A Wyandotte County judge is facing a problem that would surely 
test the fabled ruler's wisdom: Where do you send an alleged 
criminal who has undergone a sex change operation? 

L*odus Sanders, 28, Kansas City, Kan., is accused of welfare 
fraud, and the defendant's attorney contends neither a men's nor a 
women's prison is suitable for his defendant. 

"When they booked him in, they booked her in as a male," said 
Robert Feiring Tuesday. "She no longer could be placed in a men's 
prison and I'm sure the Kansas Correctional Institution for Women 
would not want her placed there." 

The defendant, accused of receiving $445 in state welfare over- 
payments while holding a part-time job, appeared Tuesday before 
Judge Tudor Nellor to request a jury trial. 

She was wearing loose-fitting slacks and a white-and-tan cardigan 
sweater, high-heeled shoes and earrings. 



Play it again, Eubie! 



t 



NEW YORK— Eubie Blake, who wiU be 96 in February, said, "Do 
you want me to play the piano?" at a party heralding release of the 
cast album of "Eubie," the current Broadway show for which he 
wrote all the music. They did. 

Blake played "I'm Just Wild about Harry" and "Memories of 
You" Monday night at the Players Club while seven cast members 
accompanied him. 

Vicki Carter, pianist for the show, suggested to Blake that he take 
her place in the pit one night. "I couldn't do it," he said. "I don't 
know the whole score. You know I wrote those songs a long time 
ago." One of them, "Charleston Rag," he wrote in 1899. 



Prince Charles is parent of two— at the zoo 

BROOKFIELD, III.— Prince Charles' Christmas present from an 
admirer is a certificate that he has become a Brookfield Zoo parent 
by adopting two polar bear cubs. 

The zoo mailed a Christmas packet to Prince Charles at 
Buckingham Palace in London Tuesday on behalf of Nancy 
Nightingale of Killeen, Tex. 

Nightingale donated $17.50 to have Prince Charles become one of 
the 200 zoo parents for the 1-year-old cubs, Little Dipper and North 
Star. 

Joyce Gardella, the zoo's director of public relations, said 
Nightingale is the former Nancy Luebben of Los Alamitos, Calif., 
who met the prince when he toured the United States in 1977. Last 
Christmas she sent him a certificate of adoption for the cubs' 
mother, Mary. 



WeatFier 



Today will be sunny and cooler, with highs in the mid 40s. TKur- 
f sday will be increasingly cloudy and a bit warmer, with highs about 
50. 




Happy 20th Birthday 
Kathy Baldwin. 

Let's get naked and jump in 
a pile at Mother's tonight. 




TONIG 





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Opinions 



Keep an eye on PBS 

If you have to watch television, don't forget the alternatives to 
watching the Battle of the Network T's and A's— public television on 
a Public Broadcasting System (PBS) station, such as KTWU 
Channel 11 at Washburn University in Topeka. 

Public television is so superior in content and consistency to what 
is broadcast on the big three networks that their run-of-the-mill 
programming is dull in comparison. Anything and everything is 
available on a PBS station, from movies and movie reviews to 
documentaries and series. The big difference is the style, flair and 
variety of the programming PBS carries. 

PBS isn't just Sesame Street-style educational television. It 
features many entertainment programs including Soundstage, a 
one-hour concert which has featured all kinds of music, including the 
Bee Gees, George Benson and Chet Atkins; Once Upon A Classic, a 
film series of classic tales; Wall Street Week, an economics 
program ; and a talk show hosted by Dick Cavett. 

Probably the greatest asset PBS programming has that will ap- 
peal to people is the total lack of commercials. Although it takes 
some getting used to, watching television without an obnoxious 
pause for the latest gadget for K-Stete, i s heaven. 

A local advantage, especially for k^State students, is the fact that 
most people can receive KTWU Channel 11 without having to call the 
cable TV people and shelling out money to be entertained. 

PBS is well worth the time anyone would spend watching 
television. 

DOUGLASS DANIEL 
Editorial Editor 

No more ruby slippers 



During my senior year in high school, I 
would oftei. come to K-State to visit my 
cousin Joyce, who lived in Goodnow Hall. As 
I would get on the bus in Hays, I would 



Ruth Bowers 



immediately smoke a cigarette— a serious 
no-no tor a young Catholic girl such as I. I 
would sit and pretend I was going off to 
college for good. 

I couldn't wait until the day came when I 
would also be living in the dorm. It was all so 
exciting then. "1 can't wait until I go to 
college. I'll be able to smoke and drink all I 
want," I said to Joyce. 

No more of this, I would say to myself. I 
would have all the freedom 1 wished. Then it 
came time to decide where I would go to 
college, and I chose Fort Hays State 
University. Since I was from Hays, I had a 
choice of where I could live. Naturally I 
chose the dorm. 

I moved in the room before my roommate 
came in. A knock came at the door. There 
was my roommate. 1 had heard of 
wallflowers, but I had never seen one in full 
bloom. She was 4-foot-ll-inches and weighed 
180 pounds. Wow! 



There went my ambitions ot having a wild 
and crazy roommate. On top of it all, she 
was a senior, which meant she would be 
studying all the time. I immediately called 
my mother and started crying, 

"I wish I could put on my ruby slippers, 
click my heels and say, 'There's no place 
like home,' " 1 cried. 

"Ruthie," Mother said, "you're going to 
do a lot of growing up. " 

But how could I ever get along with a 
straight person? She had never been out on a 
date. She had never been to a bar. And, 
worst of all, she never missed class. 

Jackie once told me she envied me 
because I was so outgoing. I always thought 
1 was going out too much. 

Changes had to be made within me. I soon 
realized there was more to college than 
drinking and smoking. 1 guess you could say 
Jackie was a good example for me. The 
night I saw ' "The Exorcist' ' I woke up Jackie 
and started crying. She stayed up all night 
with me to comfort me. 

Jackie was a friend, a true friend. 
Although she was my complete opposite, she 
was someone I admired very much. When I 
called my mother the next day, 1 said, 
"Mother, I decided to throw away my ruby 
slippers." 

I had grown up. 



Letters 



Your advice 
we can do without 



Editor, 

He: Robert Kice's letter about Iranian 
protests on campus 

Mr. Rice I'm glad at least you understood 
that "policies taken by Shah Mohammad 



"££ Collegian " 

Wednesday, December 13, 1978 

THE COLLEGIAN It published by Student 
Publication*, Inc.. Kansas Stale University, daily 
except Saturday. Sundays, holidays and vacation 
periods 

OFFICES are m the north wing of Kedile Hall, phone 
532 MS 

SECOND CLASS postage paid it Manhattan, Kansas 

UN). 

SUBSCRIPTION BATES: US. one calendar year. 
V SO, one semester 

THE COLLEOtAN functions in a legally autonomous 
relationship with the University and is written and 
edited by students serving the University community 

Paul Rhodes, Editor 
Terry Brungardt, Advertising Wanappr 



Reza and his government are wrong and 
need to be changed," but the question of 
where and how it must be done is strictly up 
to us, and we were not asking for advice of 
any kind. 

I'm sorry to hear that from an educated 
college student, especially a journalist who 
must always look for truth. 

We are not hiding behind anybody or 
anthing nor are we, the Iranian Moslems, 
asking for any donations. We are doing all 
these things that you are tired of only 
because we want to enlighten empty-headed 
people like you so that you will understand 
what's really going on. But it seems from 
what 1 understand from your letter, you will 
never be able to understand anything, 

1 thought the United States is a place 
where you can express yourself under the 
protection of the Bill of Bights. I'm sorry if 
you don't like it. 

Masoud M. Modarres 
freshman in pre-design professions 




Bumming on the slopes 



VAIL, Colo —Imagine gliding knee deep 
in snow so dry and pure that the only way to 
describe it as champagne powder. It is a 
sensation that captivates all reality and 
releases the true sixth sense— freedom. Like 
a narcotic, this freedom ain't cheap. 

There are three ways Americans pur- 
chase this freedom with their devalued 



Bill Nadon 



dollar in Colorado counties with names such 
as Summit, Eagle and Pitkin. 

The most obvious path is to spend a week s 
vacation (perhaps two weeks, usually 
divided between the winter and spring). 
This is fine for the majority of enthusiasts 
whose sense of practicality beckons them 
home after the last run on their final day. 

The second route is loo capital-intensive 
for the average nine-to-fiver. This solution 
entails the construction of a single family 
dwelling that can only be described as a 
carpenter's nightmare— if you have at least 
$150,400. 

Perhaps the third way is the most prac- 
tical and envious path from which to 
choose— packing up and taking a chance for 
the season, or perhaps a lifetime. Like the 
previous two, being a ski bum can cost a 
pretty penny. 

Now 1 should red*, tine the term ski bum as 
it pertains to the 1978-79 ski season. It is a 
long and risky process that for most starts in 
late September and early October. 

Gone are the days when a whim at 
Thanksgiving leads to an apartment rental 
contract in Vail on November 25. 

It is a well-known fact by ski resort people 
that this year is the worst for locating 
housing in Colorado, be it Aspen, Steam- 
boat, the Summit or Vail. In order to have 
found a roof, the search should have been 
conducted and completed by September 1. 

You see, the Big Bucks syndrome is at a 
lever pitch in the high country. That which 
was once employee housing is being turned 
into condominiums or time sharing units 
(for $8,000 one is entitled to two weeks of 
residence during the year). This works out 
nice for the buyer— a nifty tax deduction; 
and for the seller, a handsome profit. 



So what happens to the novice ski bum 
who arrived in late September in a car 
packed with skis and down clothing? 
Chances are those dreams of champagne 
powder have melted with the reality of 
survival. 

The, e are many stories of people sleeping 
in cars, sharing a one-room apartment with 
three other people and pitching a tent off the 
beaten track. 

Not everyone is as unlucky as the 
aforementioned. There are a few 
newcomers who secured housing in the 
many vacant condominiums during 
October. 

These units which rent for $200 a night can 
be had for as little as $300 a month in the (ill 
season. Come November 15, the rent jumps 
back to the in-season rates ($1,200 a week) 
that only tourists can afford. 

There are some apartments that are still 
vacant in October if one is willing to exer- 
cise every avenue of procurement. This 
entails slopping strangers and asking their 
assistance; chatting with shop owners; 
knocking on doors; visiting the obvious 
apartments and wailing for the weekly local 
paper, only to find a blank space under the 
For Rent section of the classifieds. 

Perhaps you do find a place to rent. The 
initial outlay for rent and deposits can mean 
a financial disaster. The monthly rent for an 
average two-bedroom unit can be from $450 
In $700 When you add up the first and last 
month's rent along with the security deposit 
the figure can run anywhere from $1,200 to 
$2,000. 

If this sounds like an article of doom, it is 
not my intention, for the good outweighs the 
bad. 

Employment is no problem once the living 
situation has been solved. As a matter of 
fact, every business in the ski town is in need 
of dependable help. Vou can pick the hours 
you want, thereby leaving plenty of time to 
schuss the slopes. 

The thrill of living with a mountain in your 
backyard can only be topped by the many 
people who have come from all over this 
country and other nations. Friendships are 
easily attained and offer an insight as to why 
it feels so good to be alive. 

Now, if only it would snow. 



tribute to the December graduate; 




■tnaMet. used to mmycu wrrc getting a hicsl tictet-' 

| -nowaday it -mm* yenfoe giving one upZ/rff Ml- 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN. Wed, December 13, 1978 



Letters 



Support 
Runt's Lib! 



Editor, 

Three hurrahs and a munchkin battle cry 
tor Tom Bell! In these times of mounting 
animosity toward us from elongated 
basketball -playing types and other cloud- 
combers at large, it is exhilarating to 
discover one of our own kind having the guts 
and grey matter to tell it like it is and shoot 
straight from the hip (unfortunately, this 
tends to hit most of you right about knee- 
level ». 

Short people of K-State, stand up (oh, you 
are? ) and be counted ! Come out of your shoe 
boxes and glove compartments and UNITE! 
Short People's International Local 226 



Petition for 
library needs 

Editor, 

Recent articles in the Collegian have 
expressed concern about K -State's library 
system, including the problems of in- 
sufficient hours and dwindling study space. 
As education majors, we too feel the impact 
of the lack of staff and inadequate hours. 
The December 8 announcement that the 
education library will no longer be staffed 
alter 5 p. m. is one example of our concern. 

Farrell Library needs more funding to 
finance additional staff in order to extend 
library hours, not only in the education 
library, but in the library system as a whole. 

As students we have an opportunity to 
express our concern about Farrell Library. 
Petitions will be circulated at spring 
registration supporting requests for ad- 
ditional library funding. II you're con- 
cerned, be sure to sign. 

Christy Karlin 

Marlesa Honey 

Education Council representatives 



supports runts' lib in its noble efforts to put 
those who wield the slings and arrows of 
outrageous height in their proper place— at 
our eye level, 

Russell Hultgren 
sophomore in marketing 

Nukes not 
a better idea 

Editor, 

Re: Ronny Baker letter favoring nuclear 
power 

I would like to know how Mr. Baker 
became an expert on nuclear power as a 
Ireshman in engineering. 

His first statement is that nuclear power 
is a renewable resource due to the fact that 
there are breeder reactors. While it is true 
breeder reactors produce more fuel than 
they consume, there are a total of zero 
operating in the U.S. today. 

Reactors currently in use produce a 
highly toxic byproduct subject to the 
hazards of transportation. Where do we 
store the poison? Do we turn what precious 
space we have into nuclear graveyards 7 

Mr. Baker's second statement that there 
isn't enough plutonium in a breeder reactor 
to build a bomb is also true, but a bomb 
placed in a reactor would send radioactive 
material into the winds to be carried to God 
knows where. 

Granted we have an energy problem, but 
nuclear power isn't a good solution because 
there are loo many problems that must be 
dealt with. 

Scott Kirk wood 
senior in architectural engineering 



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t KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«).,D«c»mbTl3,197» 

Clagett a real stickler 
over model train hobby 



< continued from p. 1 > 
his whiskers fell out. I didn't think much of it 
at the time," he said. "Then I went to bed 
and got to thinkin* that's Colonel Sanders' 
cane! So 1 got up, and in my pajamas 1 
searched on the floor 'till I found it, and 
there it is." 

Clagett admitted he's a real stickler for 
details and that his railroad is never com- 
plete. 

He said he has seasonal decorations for 
his layout, but said, "I don't make snow. The 
dust is bad enough without having to clean 
up flour." 

ONE THING Clagett said he likes about 
this railroading hobby was "I gel tired of 
one thing, there is always something else to 
do. 

"I expanded the layout from 6 by 8 feet to 7 
by 13 feet not too long ago," Clagett said. 



He said three units can run at once and he 
likes to run long trains. 

It's important that the cars weigh about 
the same <4' 2 to 5' 2 ounces), otherwise the 
lighter ones will derail on the curves, he 
said. 

The National Model Railroad Association 
* N M RA > , annua Uy sponsors a contest where 
competing model railroaders show off their 
best cars. In June 1978, Clagett won first 
place in the diesel division and received a 
plaque for his efforts. The contest included 
competitors from Oklahoma, Missouri, 
Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska and Arkansas. 

The contestants had to fill out a form sent 
by the NMRA and tell every detail they have 
done on the model car, Clagett said. 

"My definition of a hobby," Clagett said, 
"is something you go completely nuts over 
to keep from going completely nuts. " 



Two K-Staters to compete 
for Rhodes Scholarships 



Two K-State women will meet in Topeka 
today to compete with 10 other college 
students, nominated by their schools, for the 
1978 Rhodes Scholarship award. 

Jennifer Gold, senior in pre- veterinary 
medicine, and Elaine Hefty, senior in 
microbiology, were chosen earlier this 
semester from a field of seven applicants, to 
represent K-State at the state interviews. 

Hefty and Gold were selected by a faculty 
screening committee headed by Sara 
Chapman, assistant dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences, earlier this semester. 
Their names were then submitted to the 
state selection committee which gave final 
approval, Chapman said. 

Should either o( the women be selected by 
the state committee to go on to the regional 
interviews, they will have a chance to be one 
of four students from the 12 regional 
nominees to receive a Rhodes Scholarship. 



The Rhodes Scholarship is probably one of 
the most competitive awards open to 
students. Chapman said. 

Students selected to be nominees must 
have a combination of attributes, she said. 

"Although there is no set grade point 
requirement, the typical student considered 
for this scholarship is one that is not only an 
honors student, but also exhibits a high 
degree of integrity and a proven ability to 
lead." 



The scholarship would be a $6,000 annual 
amount plus transportation costs to and 
from Oxford University in England, where 
the students study for two years, and 
educational fees, John Chalmers, vice 
president of academic affairs, said. 



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•Iranians dispute number 
of injuries in two-day war 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wtd., D*c«mb«r 13, 1978 



TEHRAN, Iran (AP)— Army troops firing 
from the ground and from helicopters have 
killed at least 40 persons and wounded more 
than 600 since Monday in the city of Isfahan, 
medical and opposition sources said 
Tuesday, But the government said only six 
were dead. 

The sources said the five hospitals in the 
industrial city, 250 miles south of Tehran, 
were jammed with seriously wounded 
civilians. 

They reported more than 20 of the persons 
slain by heavy gunfire were killed Monday 
when rioting broke out after a religious 
demonstration on Ashura, an emotional 
peak of the Shiite Moslem holy month of 
Moharram. 

Opposition sources claimed hundreds of 
shah foes were massacred by army gunfire, 
some of it machine gun barrages from 
helicopters. 



But the city's governor, Manuchehr 
Hacjdan, denied the charges in an interview 
with The Associated Press. Official sources 
thus far have confirmed six fatalities and 
many wounded in the two days of violence. 

Haqdan blamed the reports of higher 
casualties on anti-government forces trying 
to whip up support for rebellion in other 
cities. 

A DOCTOR in one of Isfahan's main 
hospitals said wards were packed with 
persons suffering from bullet wounds or 
severe beatings by troops and loyalist 
supporters of Shah Mohammad Reza 
Pahlavi. 

"The military is threatening to cut off 
power in the city," the doctor said, "If that 
happens, many of these people will die 
because we will not be able to treat them or 
keep them on life support systems." 




SELL YOUR 

BOOKS 
AT VARNEY'S 



*Bring all your books to Varney's 
and our buyers will value them in- 
dividually. Vou choose what you 
want to sell. WE BUY BOOKS 
EVERY DAY including Saturdays 
and Sundays. 



* The price we pay for books is determined 
mainly by two factors— if the books will be used 
again at K-State and if we need the books for 
our stock. If we cannot buy your books for our 
stock, we will offer you the best price we can, 
based on the National market. 

* If you accept a trade check, (that you have a 
year to use at Varney's) we will pay you 10% 
more for your books includng the ones you sell 
at wholesale. You get more value for your book 
with a trade check. 

* We're proud of the fact that our own people do 
the book buying. We don't have a company that 
is here today and gone tomorrow with no con- 
nections at K-State, conduct our buy back. At 
Varney's the same people that help you 
everyday, all year, buy your books. 

* Remember, it's what you get for all your books 
that counts, and we think that the wholesaler we 
buy for pays the highest prices. 

*We know you're busy and in a hurry so we 
have five buyers to take care of you. We try to 
keep the time you spend in line to a minimum. We 
also buy until 9: 00 at night during final week. 

- BUY BACK SCHEDULE - 

Wed., Dec. 13-Sat., Dec. 16—9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

Sun., Dec. 17, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. 
Mon., Dec. 18— Thurs., Dec. 21— 8:00 a.m.-9 :00p.m. 





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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wsd., December 13, 1878 



i 



Postal laws cancels 
dorm's income plan . 

Boyd Hall's new Student Council was 
delivering Christmas cards for 5 cents 
apiece in the residence hall system until 
they discovered it was against the law. 

Anna Miskovsky, freshman in home 
economics journalism and mass com- 
munications and representatives for the 
new Student Council, said the main purpose 
of the Christmas card delivering system 
was to serve the students. 

"We only earned $5.81 the first week and 
that was a lot of work. Our main purpose 
was to render a student service, but also to 
make a little bit of money for a sorely 
needed vacuum cleaner," she said. 

According to Pat Magerkurth, Strong 
complex director, someone suggested 
delivering cards for money could be against 
U.S. Postal Service laws, so Magerkurth 
checked with the University attorney. 

"1 understood him to say that we could be 
classified as a condominium or apartment- 
type living system, which is a closed living 
system, so he didn't think to the best of his 
knowledge we were doing anything illegal. I 
didn't ask him lo research it because I didn't 
think it was any big deal," she said. 

Consequently she received a message 
saying the University attorney had checked 
with the post office and discovered the new 
Student Council's card delivering system 
was illegal. 

"I then decided I had better call the post 
office and see for myself. I talked to the 
postmaster here, Oscar Brewman, and he 
talked lo the postal inspector in Topeka, who 
said what we were doing was against a 
statute," Magerkurth said. 

She said she tried to explain to Brewman 
that the residence hall system was a closed 
system and students could not send cards 
through campus mail. Brewman said all 
Magerkurth could do was write a letter to 
him requesting an appeal to the Mail 
Classification Bureau in Topeka. 

"I have already sent a letter to the Mail 
Classification Bureau in Topeka, but if I 
don't get anywhere with them, I will appeal 
to the Mail Classification Bureau in 
Washington The only place logo from there 
is the courts, but ! won't go the court route 
because it would lake too much University 
time and money," she said. 

Magerkurth said she was upset because 
no one could read to her the statute which 
the new Student Council was supposedly 
breaking. She found it herself and 
discovered the statute was called the 
Private Express Statute, but she is still 
unsure what il means. 

"I'd heard of someone back East who 
tried to set up a delivering system in 
compel ition with the post office, which of 
course is against the law. I question whether 
our delivering system is similar to that," 
Magerkurth said. 

The Boyd Hall new Student Council is still 
delivering Christmas cards, but now they 
are doing it for free, Miskovsky said. 

"We have a box at every switchboard and 
the cards are picked up every day. We place 
a small stamp in the place of the regular 
stamp saying 'Delivered by Boyd Hall's 
New Student Council, December 1978,' "she 
said. "It is just an impressive way of sen- 
ding your Christmas cards instead of sen- 
ding them yourself." 




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Fri. -Sal. til TM 

Sunday* 1 4 Ml Chrtatoin. 




Buy-Back 



Here 
are some 
answers to 
often asked questions, 




Question: 
Answer: 



How does ths Union Bookstore determine how much your 
books are worth when you sell them back? 

If the Bookstore has notification from the instructor that the 
books are to be re-adopted for use the next semester, and if the 
Bookstore does not already have a sufficient stock on hand, then 
you will be offered 60 per cent of the publisher's current list price. 

For example: if a book sells for $10.00 new and it meets the 
requirements noted above, the book would be bought from you for 
$6.00. 

If the Bookstore has not received notice that the book will be 
used again, or if it already has a sufficient stock on hand, the book 
would be worth the current wholesale price as indicated by one of 
the nation's largest jobbers of used textbooks. 

If you have any questions about the price being paid for a text- 
book, the buyer will be happy to answer any questions which you 
may have regarding the price paid. 



Question: 

Answer: 



Is 60 per cent the usual price paid 
for textbooks around the country? 

Definitely not. Most stores in the United States pay only 50 per 
cent for books being used again. The Union Bookstore is one of the 
few stores which pays 60 per cent. And remember, we pay cash. You 
don't have to take your money out in trade. 



Question: 
Answer: 



What about paperbacks? Does the 
60 per cent policy apply to them too? 

Yes. The Union Bookstore does not penalize you on paper- 
backs. If they are being used again, and if the bookstore needs 
them, you will receive 60 per cent of the publisher's list price. 



Question: 
Answer: 



If the publisher's price has gone up since I bought my books, 
will I receive the benefit of that price increase? 

Yes, For instance, it you bought your book for $9.00 and the 
publisher's list price is now $10.00, you will get $6.00, not $5.40. 



We will buy books: 




Monday, Dec 11 

thru 

Friday, Dec. 15 


8:15 a.m. 

to 
4:45 p.m. 


Saturday, Dec. 16 


10:00 a.m. 

to 

4:00 p.m. 


Monday, Dec. 18 

thru 

Friday, Dec. 22 


8:15 a.m. 
to 

4:45 p.m. 



k state union 



bookstore 



0301 






' Bennett supports tractorcade; 

farmer a 'victim' of government 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wed., December 13. 1979 



TUPKKA <AP>-Gov. Robert Bennett 
look steps Tuesday to support a demon- 
stration planned by Kansas farmers to 
dramatize their problems and urge 
solutions. 

He also set out nine guidelines for the 
conduct of the demonstration and the stale 
support. 

The demonstration is taking the form of a 
parade of farm vehicles to Topeka for a 
rally a I the stale Capitol. 

"I have said on many occasions thai 
government should support those inclined to 
peacefully and safely express their point of 
view. thus exercising one of their 'First 
Amendment freedoms,'" Bennett said in a 
prepared statement 

"In no single instance here in Kansas is 
such a duty more clear than in the 
agricultural movement. Indeed, Kansas is 
the greatest agricultural stale in the union. 
Agriculture is the backbone of its economy 
and its principal mission is meeting the 
world crisis ot food and fiber. " 

Bennett said he is ordering the Kansas 
secretary of transportation to grant 
authority lor 'these embattled farmers" to 
use designated state and federally- 
numbered highways, where safety con- 
ditions dictate, during daylight hours, to 
travel from I heir I, inns lo Topeka in convoy 
fashion. 

• • • 

AAM tractorcade 
Topeka-bound 

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS 

About 40 traelors began a four-day 
journey Tuesday in a tractorcade that 
sponsoring American Agriculture 
Movement (AAM) officials hope will 
number in the hundreds by the time it 
reaches Topeka. 

The tractors departed from five western 
Kansas communities and were joined by a 
number of support vehicles for their slow 
journey to ihe state capital. 

Weather conditions at the start of the 
caravan processions were good, but AAM 
spokesman Martie Floyd of the state strike 
office in Johnson said he could not estimate 
how many would join in the tractorcade. 

As many as 1,800 tractors were estimated 
to be in Topeka a year ago in the first 
tractorcade by the state AAM. 

The tractorcade is designed to rekindle 
interest in the first anniverary of the AAM, 
on Thursday, and in a nationwide caravan to 
Washington, DC, that will leave in mid- 
January. 

After the separate caravans converge in 
Topeka Friday, the tractors will be paraded 
into the city Saturday morning to Municipal 
Auditorium, where Gov. Robert Bennett, 
U.S. Rep. Dan Glickman and a number of 
AAM officials will be among the speakers. 

About 15 tractors left from the starting 
point at Sharon Springs and nine each from 
Johnson and Plains. No tractors showed up 
at one of the scheduled starting points in 
Syracuse. 

Overnight stops were scheduled for Dodge 
City, Garden City, Oakley, Norton and 
Pratt. 



BUSINESS SENIORS 

Interested in Resume Booklet 

Pick Up Data Sheet For 

CBA Resume Booklet In 

Dean's Office In Calvin 

By Wed., Dec. 13th 

Have Them In 
By Fri., Dec. 15th 

(Form Is Identical To 
Placement Centers) 



"I am also ordering the superintendent of 
the Highway Patrol lo furnish escort ser- 
vices to each convoy as it travels on state 
and U. S. numbered highways, including 
interstate routes, and to provide the 
maximum assistance possible to see that 
this demonstration is peaceably and safely 
carried out," the governor said. 

BENNETT CHARGED that agriculture 

and the American farmer have become 

"victims of a careless Washington 

bureaucracy, a confused Congress and a 

forgetful administration ." 

"State government can and should assist 
those willing lo make the necessary 
sacrifices to demonstrate their concern and 
their frustration with their current plight," 
lie nnetl said. 



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The book 

no college student 
should be without. 

It may not contain any great reading material, but it does 
contain some truly wonderful eating material. 

That's because our indispensable book is a book of 
McDonald's® Gift Certificates. It costs only five dollars (it's an 
inexpensive soft cover edition). And each of the ten 
certificates inside is worth fifty cents toward the purchase of 
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other good food. 

So, when your scholar is starved for more than knowledge, 
make sure he has a book of our Gift Certificates around. 

It'll give him food for thought. 

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KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, W«J., IXctnbW 1S.1S78 



We are the 
titanics, and 
we're unsinkable 





POLO 

Some like 
it wet 



The Titanics stayed on top for the second 
consecutive year to become the undefeated 
1978 champions of innertube water polo 
Monday night. 

The Titanics, comprised of Acacia men 
and women from area sororities, won the 
championship in a 9-5 victory over AVMA, 
the veterinary students of K-State. 

Pinpoint accuracy on shots-on-goal by the 
Titanics tipped the balance for them in an 
otherwise close match. Both teams splashed 
chaotically in executing offensive 
maneuvers, bul when driving hard on the 
goal, the Titanics made every shot count. 

The victors scrambled for the ball and 
opened the scoring with a 25-foot slab from 
the corner that left the opposing goalie 
floundering. After scoring another, the 
AVMAs were able to respond with one goal 
to end the quarter. 

THE AVMAs came back in the second 
quarter by capitalizing on two personal fouls 
by the Titanics. They scored twice, rushing 
past the Titanics and slamming the ball 
home from about 25 feet each time. Another 
score was tallied when AVMA received a 
free shot The Titanics, at full strength, 
could only muster a one-goal answer to 
AVMAs' flurry. The half ended with AVMA 
leading 4 to 3. 

IN THE second half, the Titanics seemed 
to have formalized a game plan because 
within minutes they scored twice, leaving 
the AVMA team in confusion. 

The Titanics dominated the third quarter 
by shutting out the AVMAs. Their offense 
seemed to have taken shape, and as a result 
they captured the lead as the quarter ended. 

In the final quarter the Titanics' offense 
seemed overwhelming with many AVMA 
turnovers contributing to the Titanics' 
momentum. 

They benefited by the turnovers and 
scored twice. With three minutes 
remaining, they scored again. 

The AVMAs managed only one more score 
past the Titanics before the Titanics 
wrapped up the game with a slammer to 
ease them past the AVMA team 9 to 5. 

Innertube water polo is played only in 
intramurals at K -Stale. Swimming pools at 
the nata fori urn are not deep enough for the 
regular game, so innertubes are used. 



Stofl pflotoiby Bo Rader 

TOP LEFT.. .Phil Streeter, high scorer tor the AVMAs, hauls out 
the inner tubes used to play water polo. TOP RIGHT.. .Waiting 
for the the starter's wistle, Margo Jones,of the Titanics keeps one 
eye on her opponents. MIDOLE...KIm Bender (right) of the 
Titanics battles with Amy Anderson of the AVMAs for possession 
of the ball late In the second half. ABOVE. ..Brian Kriiek (right) 
of the Titanics, puts the grip on Phil Streeter, as Streeter at- 
tempts to shoot. RIGHT... Team mates of the Titanics take a 
break while waiting for the start of the second half. 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN, Wed, December 13, 187S 



11 



Brown vs. Board attorney 
recalls segregation battle 



By SUSAN BRINK 
Collegian Reporter 

Charles Scott, a Topeka attorney, spoke in 
Eisenhower Hall Tuesday on epochal 
Supreme Court decisions, 

Scott was one of the attorneys for the 
Brown vs. Board of Education case, one of 
the four 1954 Supreme Court cases which 
succeeded in abolishing the separate but 
equal doctrine for public facilities in the 
United States 

When Scott returned from World War II in 
1946, he said he was challenged to change 
the inquitities suffered by many blacks. 

"The best way to bring about those 
changes was lo try to better ourselves 
academically and see what we could do," 
Scott said. He became allied with the 
NAACP because he believed he has to in- 
volve himself to bring about a social change. 




Charles Scott 

The NAACP began questioning the 
existence of segregated public elementary 
schools in 1948. Its goal at that time was to 
change the situation of separate school 
attendance by abolishing separate but equal 
education facilities, Scott said, 

IN 1951, Scott look the opportunity to 
represent Linda Brown and about 20 other 
plaintiffs in the Brown case. Brown wanted 
to attend Sumner High School, which was 
closer to her home, bul was required to 
attend the all-black Monroe High School 

The NAACP requested that the school 
hiard dismantle the separate but equal 
facilities without a cou